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  • 1. Awuba, Jude
    et al.
    Macassa, Gloria
    HIV/AIDS in Cameroon: Rising gender issues in policy-making matters2007In: African Journal of Health Sciences, ISSN 1022-9272, E-ISSN 2306-1987, Vol. 14, no 3-4, p. 118-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This literature review investigated gender differentials in HIV/AIDS in Cameroon and to which extent gender was taken into account in the country’s current policy on HIV/AIDS. The review found that in Cameroon women were at increased risk of being infected with HIV/AIDS compared to men and that apart from biological vulnerability, socio-cultural as well as economic factors accounted for those differences. In addition, the review found that at the policy level, the government has drawn up plans to reduce the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS among women. However, although the current policy acknowledged the need for tackling gender differentials in HIV/AIDS transmission; little has been done at the level of implementation. The current policy needs to be implemented in a more effective manner and a multisectorial approach should be explored in order to curb the current trend of the feminization of HIV/AIDS in Cameroon.

  • 2. Innocent, M
    et al.
    Ndonko, F
    Ngo’o, G
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Breaking the Silence: Understanding the practice of Breast ironing in Cameroon2012In: African Journal of Health Sciences, ISSN 1022-9272, E-ISSN 2306-1987, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 232-237Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    A Matter of Faith: Unravelling the role of religion on child survival inSub-Saharan Africa2012In: African Journal of Health Sciences, ISSN 1022-9272, E-ISSN 2306-1987, no 22, p. 238-247Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Burström, B
    Karolinska Institute.
    Determinants of social inequalities in child mortality in Mozambique: What do we know? What could be done?2006In: African Journal of Health Sciences, ISSN 1022-9272, E-ISSN 2306-1987, no 13, p. 139-143Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Burström, B
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Poverty and child mortality in different contexts: can Mozambique learn from the decline in mortality at the turn of the 19th century inStockholm?2005In: African Journal of Health Sciences, ISSN 1022-9272, E-ISSN 2306-1987, no 12, p. 31-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Child mortality has declined in many low-income countries. However, in Sub-Saharan Africa, childhood mortality is still a major public health problem, which is worsening with some countries experiencing new increases in mortality due to HIV /AIDS. This lack of success in reducing child mortality is not only due to HIV /AIDS, but also to high numbers of deaths in other causes of death such as diarrhoea, pneumonia and neonatal causes, for which there are effective curative and preventative interventions. One problem seems to be in the access, coverage and implementation of these interventions, particularly among the poorer sections of the population. A related problem is the interventions that sometimes, when implemented, take place in environments in which they can only be expected to have limited effects. On the other hand in many developed countries infant and child mortality declined as social and economic changes of modernisation took place. However, the mechanisms that did bring about the decline are still not well understood. This paper discuss whether analyses of the historical decline of mortality in industrialised countries could contribute to knowledge in reducing the high child mortality in poor countries today, based on studies of child mortality in different social contexts in Mozambique 1973-1997 and Stockholm 1878-1925.

  • 6.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Hallqvist, J
    Karolinska Institutetet.
    Lynch, JW
    McGill University, Montreal .
    Inequalities in Child Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Social Epidemiologic Framework2011In: African Journal of Health Sciences, ISSN 1022-9272, E-ISSN 2306-1987, no 18, p. 14-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past twenty years or so, the study of the determinants of child survival in low-income countries has been based on demographic conceptual frameworks. The most widely known has been the Mosley and Chen framework (1). In that framework, the key concept was a set of proximate determinants, or intermediate variables, that directly influence the risk of morbidity and mortality. It assumes that all the more distal social and economic determinants must operate through these variables to affect child survival. However the Mosley and Chen framework has failed to directly incorporate the complex social dimension of health.The objective of this paper is to link more distal causes for child health by describing a framework that conceptualises the relation between distal and proximal factors and how they operate to cause inequalities in child mortality within sub-Saharan Africa. Additionally the framework defines policy entry points needing support of empirical evidence. Furthermore the paper acknowledges that the social context plays an important role for inequalities in children’s chances of survival. However, the relative importance of the mechanisms presented in the proposed framework may vary among the different countries of sub-Saharan Africa, thus researchers should empirically adapt the framework to their specific context.

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