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  • 1.
    Alricsson, Marie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Domalewski, D
    Romild, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Asplund, Ragnar
    Physical activity, health, body mass index, sleeping habits and bodycomplaints in Australian senior high school students2008In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 501-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents in the industrial world are becoming less physically active and are increasingly adopting a sedentary life-style in front of computers and television screens. OBJECTIVE: to determine self-related health, physical activity, sleeping habits, prevalence of overweight, and body complaints in Australian senior high school students. METHODS: Participants were 466 high school students aged 15-17 years enrolled in academic and vocational programs. A questionnaire was completed at two senior high schools with questions about weight and height, health, physical activity, type of physical activity/sport, intensity, sleeping habits, and possible injuries or complaints during the last three months. RESULTS: Seventy seven percent of the high school students participated in sports on a regular basis. Compared with vocational programs, more males and females in academic programs participated in sports (71% and 80% respectively) (p = .036). Males reported significantly better health than females (p < .0001). 65% of the study group reported body complaints during the last 3 months. A higher number of females than males reported complaints about the back (p = .007) and the hip (p = .05). Good sleep was reported in 82.1% of males and in 76.6% of females. In males, 44.3% were often sleepy in the daytime (females 56.6%, p < .01). CONCLUSIONS: Underweight, physical activity and good sleep are factors with significant positive effect on good health, whereas overweight is a negative factor. Proper sleep habits and higher physical activity levels should be promoted among high school students, and TV viewing time and video game use restricted. Additionally, schools should provide opportunities for young people to participate in a wider range of physical activities that address their individual needs while promoting the health benefits of engaging in regular exercise.

  • 2.
    Ekström, Annika
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Kalmar/Växjö.
    Hafsteinsson Östenberg, Anna
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö.
    Björklund, Glenn
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Linnéuniversitetet, Kalmar/Växjö.
    The effects of introducing Tabata interval training and stability exercises to school children as a school-based intervention program2019In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 31, no 4, article id 20170043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Physical activities during leisure time as well as school hours have changed over the past few years, with adolescents being less physically active and adopting a sedentary lifestyle.

    Objective

    The overall objective of this mixed-methods study was to evaluate the feasibility of introducing a 4-min Tabata interval training into a lower secondary school context. A further aim was to evaluate the possible effects on: coordination, balance, and strength.

    Methods

    The study was conducted as an intervention study with a mixed-method approach. Forty-three children, aged 7–9 years, participated in the intervention group. Additionally, 13 children were recruited as a control group. The intervention itself was delivered by the teachers and was performed for 4-min every day in a classroom setting. All participants performed physical tests before and after the intervention period to evaluate the Tabata training. After the completion of the 6-week Tabata interval training, the four teachers were interviewed.

    Results

    The push-ups (p = 0.004), kneeling push-ups (p = 0.03), and standing long jump (p = 0.01) improved in the intervention group after 6 weeks. No differences were observed between the genders. The teachers experienced that it worked well to integrate the Tabata interval training in the classroom setting.

    Conclusion

    After 6 weeks, a school-based Tabata intervention program improved physical performance. The teachers saw no obstacles in including the Tabata intervention program in a classroom setting and pointed out several positive aspects such as an increased energy level and development in the children’s movement patterns.

  • 3.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ahnesjö, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Awareness of current recommendations and guidelines regarding strength training for youth2014In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 517-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Aim: Physical conditioning of youth has always been a controversial topic as it raises ethical, physiological, and medical issues. Current recommendations and guidelines suggest that strength training is a relatively safe and worthwhile method in conditioning youth. This, however, requires well-informed coaches who follow age-appropriate strength training recommendations and guidelines, compiles well-designed strength training programs, and provides qualified supervision and instructions. The purpose of this study was to investigate coaches' awareness of current recommendations and guidelines regarding strength training for youth. Method: A total of 39 football (US: soccer) coaches (34 males and 5 females) training boys in age groups 8-12 years were included in this study. Data were collected using an attitude statement questionnaire, and the assertions were based upon current recommendations and guidelines. Results: The results revealed significant differences among coaches in terms of knowledge of important aspects of strength training for youth. Conclusions: The results suggested that coaches in the present study were not aware of the latest recommendations and guidelines regarding strength training for youth.

  • 4.
    Kahlin, Y.
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Karolinska Institutet.
    Werner, S.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet.
    Edman, G.
    Department of Psychiatry, Tiohundra AB, Norrtälje.
    Raustorp, A.
    University of Gothenburg, Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Physical self-esteem and personality traits in Swedish physically inactive female high school students: an intervention study2016In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 363-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity provides fundamental health benefits and plays a positive role in physical well-being. The aim of this present study was to investigate whether a 6-month physical activity program could influence physical self-esteem and frequency of physical activity in physically inactive female high school students in short- and long-term periods and whether personality traits were related to physical activity behaviour and compliance with the program. METHODS: The study was a cluster-randomised controlled intervention study including 104 physically inactive female high school students aged 16-19 years, 60 females in an intervention group and 44 females in a control group. The intervention group exercised at sport centres at least once per week during a 6-month period. Questionnaires were used for evaluation. RESULTS: At a 6-month follow up, the intervention group improved physical self-perception in all subdomains and significantly improved physical condition, physical self-worth and self-related health compared to the control group. At 1-year follow up, 25 females out of 53 females were still physically active, and all ratings remained almost the same as at the 6-month follow up. There were no particular personality traits that were dominant in the groups. CONCLUSION: A 6-month physical activity program can positively influence physical self-esteem and the frequency of physical activity, both from a short- and long-term perspective.

  • 5.
    Nordahl, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Rita
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Westin, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Werner, Suzanne
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Experiences of returning to elite alpine skiing after ACL injury and ACL reconstruction2014In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 69-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the experiences of alpine skiing at the elite level after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction.

    Design: A qualitative approach where semi-structured interviews were conducted, and an analysis of the manifest content was performed.

    Participants: Five ski high school students, two male and three female skiers, who had suffered ACL injuries and undergone ACL reconstructions.

    Results: Seven categories were identified. The participants described their perceived opportunities with regard to returning to alpine skiing after ACL injury and reconstruction as something positive to do with self-belief, being mentally and physically prepared, regaining confidence in their own ability, being given time and using active strategies. In contrast, perceived barriers to a return to elite alpine skiing gave rise to negative feelings, for example, fear, disheartenment, a total lack of or ambivalent confidence in their own ability and the use of passive strategies.

    Conclusion: The two male skiers returned to alpine skiing. They reported confidence in their own ability, active strategies and support on all levels, as well as enhanced physical ability. The female skiers did not return to their pre-injury level of competitive alpine skiing. They stated a lack of support on all levels, deterioration in their physical ability and two out of three reported passive strategies and no or ambivalent confidence in their own ability. The most important factors were family support, support on all levels, access to a physiotherapist and time given.

  • 6. Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    Archer, Trevor
    Svensson, Kjell
    Perlinger, Thommy
    Alricsson, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Physical self esteem - A five year follow up study on Swedish adolescents2009In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 497-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the levels and inter-correlations of physical self-esteem, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), and body fat and, in addition, distinctive of individuals with high vs. low physical self-worth in a longitudinal design during adolescence. Methods: At mean ages 12.7, 15.7, and 17.7 years, physical activity (steps/day) was measured for four consecutive schooldays of 77 (41 girls) Swedish adolescents. Perceived physical self-esteem, height, weight, and at ages 15.7 and 17.7 years, body fat percent was also measured. Results: Boys' physical self-perception scores were higher than girls' and an overall stability during adolescents was seen. High and low physical self-worth had a significant impact regarding BMI at ages 12.7 and 17.7 years and regarding body fat at age 17.7 years in both boys and girls. Conclusions: Regression analysis indicated that BMI and body fat counter-predicted self-worth in girls age-dependently. Efforts to build adapted physical activity programs for overweight and obese are emphasized.

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