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  • 1.
    Gebert-Persson, Sabine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Gidhagen, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Sallis, James E.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Lundberg, Heléne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Economics, Geography, Law and Tourism.
    Online insurance claims: when more than trust matters2019In: International Journal of Bank Marketing, ISSN 0265-2323, E-ISSN 1758-5937, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 579-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a theoretical framework explaining the adoption of online insurance claims characterised by infrequent interactions, inherent complexity and risk. It extends the technology acceptance model to include knowledge-related and trust-related beliefs. Design/methodology/approach: The framework is tested with structural equation modelling using data from a survey of 292 customers who made online insurance claims. Findings are further explained through 30 telephone interviews conducted with online and offline claimants. Findings: Previous research in financial services has shown trust to be equally or more important than perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use in forming attitudes towards adopting online insurance applications. The findings of this paper contradict this by showing, at best, a weak relationship between trusting attitude and intention to use the online service. Trust is somewhat meaningful; however, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness and technology attitude are substantially more important in an online insurance claims setting. Research limitations/implications: Contradictory results always beg further research to assure their robustness. Nevertheless, they can also point to a developing trend where trust in the internet channel, per se, is of diminishing importance. Internet and product knowledge are not as pertinent to forming intentions as usefulness and ease of use. Practical implications: To encourage customers to adopt online applications for a trusted company, all emphasis should be on user friendliness and perceived usefulness of the online interface. Originality/value: Compared to other channels, consumers are no longer naïve or distrustful of the online channel for interacting with a firm. If they perceive usefulness and ease of use, they will adopt the offered service. 

  • 2.
    Gidhagen, Mikael
    et al.
    Department of Business Studies, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gebert Persson, Sabine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Determinants of digitally instigated insurance relationships2011In: International Journal of Bank Marketing, ISSN 0265-2323, E-ISSN 1758-5937, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 517-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model for explaining insurance customers' intentions towards using the internet as a channel for communication and interaction with insurance companies by integrating Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and trust. Design/methodology/approach: The paper seeks to conceptually develop an integrated framework for studying and measuring the perceptions of customers towards using the internet as a source of communication and interaction. The TAM model is taken as a point of departure where trust and trustworthiness, being essential in insurance relationships, have been included in the model. Trust is divided into perceived competence, perceived benevolence and perceived integrity, which in turn affect whether the customer will find the firm trustworthy or not. A second dimension that is developed in this paper is the disposition to trust, which is defined as a customer-related factor. This disposition to trust is in turn affected by the customer's internet knowledge and product knowledge. Findings: The paper contributes by developing the model for understanding and explaining factors that affect customers' attitudes and intentions towards on-line interactions. By emphasizing internet-, customer- and Ffrm-related factors, it would arguably be possible to explain factors that affect trust, and trustworthiness, as well as the customer's attitudes towards the organization and the communication and distribution channel while also integrating the customer-specific factors. Research limitations: The model developed in this paper is conceptual and needs to be tested empirically. Originality/value: The findings of this paper will serve as a basis for further research aiming at answering the research question on what factors affect customers' attitudes towards using the internet as an interface within the financial services sector. It also contributes to practices by identifying and defining factors that can affect trust in relationshipsas well as the choice of communication and distribution channels depending on customers' attitudes. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 3.
    Lundberg, Heléne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Economics, Geography, Law and Tourism.
    Bank relationships’ contributions to SME export performance2019In: International Journal of Bank Marketing, ISSN 0265-2323, E-ISSN 1758-5937, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 1143-1164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine to what extent, and in what ways, various types of bank support improve small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) export performance. It contributes to bank marketing and international marketing theory and practice by clarifying bank contributions to SME export performance at the firm level. Design/methodology/approach: The study method is an on-site survey, encompassing 135 manufacturing Swedish SMEs. Five hypotheses are tested using ordinary least squares regression. Findings: The higher the export performance, the greater the importance attributed to bank funding of international business. The importance of transaction and/or currency services provided by banks for SMEs’ ability to do business abroad was confirmed, but with the important limitation that the effect diminishes as the number of markets increases. Furthermore, the results indicate that SMEs with low export performance attach a high importance to the advisory services that banks can offer regarding international business. No significant results for knowledge sharing or support from bank contacts were found. Practical implications: SME managers are encouraged to view banks as potential providers of a diverse set of value-added resources while taking into consideration that some banks will have more developed resources and support policies than others. The study results also assist banks in building effective strategies for enhancing their relationships with SME clients, as it provides detailed information on how SMEs relate different kinds of bank services to their export performance. Originality/value: As the first paper to describe SME-perceived relationships between different bank services and export performance, this study informs bank marketing and international marketing theory about bank contributions to SME internationalisation. 

  • 4.
    Wahlberg, Olof
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law.
    Öhman, Peter
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law.
    Strandberg, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law.
    How personal advisors make a difference in serving “almost rich” bank customers2016In: International Journal of Bank Marketing, ISSN 0265-2323, E-ISSN 1758-5937, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 904-923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to explore mass affluent customer perceptions of the service quality delivered by personal advisors and banks, and the contributions of personal advisors and banks to customer satisfaction; and also to analyse the strength of the relationship between customer satisfaction with personal advisors and banks.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A survey composed of items designed to mirror service quality practices used in the mass affluent segment was administered to customers of a major Swedish bank. Statistical analyses of the responses were performed.

    Findings

    Four service quality dimensions are identified as salient to customer satisfaction: interpersonal behaviour, knowledge, service portfolio, and trust. The relative importance of these dimensions depends on whether customer satisfaction with the personal advisor or the bank is focused. Moreover, the analysis indicates a double “rubbing off” effect where customer satisfaction with the personal advisor influences customer satisfaction with the bank and vice versa.

    Originality/value

    The unexplored separation of service quality provided by the bank and the personal advisor is central to perceived service quality. The study focuses on customer satisfaction in the mass affluent segment, which is an unexplored context different from retail banking.

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