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  • 1.
    Alimadadi, Majid
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Uesaka, Tetsu
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    3D-oriented fiber networks made by foam forming2016In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 661-671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In industrial applications, such as paper and nonwovens, cellulose fibers are used in the form of a network where the fibers are oriented more or less in the sheet-plane direction. However, in many biological systems, fibers are instead oriented in a three-dimensional (3D) space, creating a wide variety of functionalities. In this study we created a 3D-oriented fiber network on the laboratory scale and have identified some unique features of its structure and mechanical properties. The 3D fiber network sheets were prepared by using foam-forming as well as modifying consolidation and drying procedures. The fiber orientation and tensile/compression behavior were determined. The resulting sheets were extremely bulky (above 190 cm3/g) and had extremely low stiffness (or high softness) compared to the reference handsheets. Despite this high bulk, the sheets retained good structural integrity. We found that a 3D-oriented fiber network requires much less fiber-fiber contact to create a connected (“percolated”) network than a two-dimensionally oriented network. The compression behavior in the thickness direction was also unique, characterized by extreme compressibility because of its extreme bulk and a long initial increase in the compression load as well as high strain recovery after compression because of its fiber reorientation during compression.

  • 2.
    Alves, Luis
    et al.
    Univ Coimbra, Dept Chem, P-3004535 Coimbra, Portugal..
    Medronho, Bruno
    Univ Algarve, Fac Sci & Technol MEDITBIO, Campus Gambelas,Ed 8, P-8005139 Faro, Portugal..
    Antunes, Filipe E.
    Univ Coimbra, Dept Chem, P-3004535 Coimbra, Portugal..
    Topgaard, Daniel
    Lund Univ, Ctr Chem & Chem Engn, Dept Chem, Div Phys Chem, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Lindman, Björn
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering. Nanyang Technol Univ, Mat Sci & Engn, Singapore 639798, Singapore.
    Dissolution state of cellulose in aqueous systems. 1. Alkaline solvents2016In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 247-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of the state of dissolution of cellulose in a certain solvent is a critical step forward in the development of new efficient solvent systems for cellulose. Nevertheless, obtaining such information is not trivial. Recently, polarization transfer solid-state NMR (PTssNMR) was shown to be a very promising technique regarding an efficient and robust characterization of the solution state of cellulose. In the present study, combining PTssNMR, microscopic techniques and X-ray diffraction, a set of alkaline aqueous systems are investigated. The addition of specific additives, such as urea or thiourea, to aqueous NaOH based systems as well as the use of an amphiphilic organic cation, is found to have pronounced effects on the dissolution efficiency of cellulose. Additionally, the characteristics of the regenerated material are strongly dependent on the dissolution system; typically less crystalline materials, presenting smoother morphologies, are obtained when amphiphilic solvents or additives are used.

  • 3. Andreasson, B
    et al.
    Forsström, Jennie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Wågberg, Lars
    Determination of fibre pore structure: influence of salt, pH and conventional wet strength resins2005In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 253-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been shown, in the present investigation, that the two methods used to investigate the pore size distribution of unbleached chemical pulps, i.e. inverse size exclusion chromatography (ISEC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), give different average pore radius for the pores inside the fibre wall. This is due to the way in which these experiments are performed and the sensitivity of the methods to different types of pores in the cell wall. It was also shown that the two methods gave different results when changing the pH and the ionic strength of the pulp suspension. The pore radius, as detected with ISEC, decreased with both increasing ionic strength and decreasing pH, indicating a loose structure of the exterior of the fibrillar network. However, the pore radius as detected with NMR, was virtually unaffected when increasing the ionic strength, indicating a very rigid structure of the interior of the fibre wall. Decreasing pH though, lead to a decrease in pore radius indicating that upon protonation of the carboxylic groups in the fibre wall, the electrostatic repulsion is diminished and the average pore radius decreases. The NMR technique was also used to study wet strength aid penetration into the fibre wall. It was shown that wet strength aids with a small molecular weight, penetrated the fibre wall, as detected by a decrease in pore radius. It was also shown that addition of different wet strength aids increased the tensile index of the sheet and decreased the fibre strength, measured as zero span-strength of the sheets.

  • 4.
    Fält, Susanna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Wågberg, Lars
    Vesterlind, Eva-Lotta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Larsson, P.T.
    Model films of cellulose II - Improved preparation method and characterization of the cellulose film2004In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 151-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An optimization study of the preparation of spin-coated cellulose model films from the NMMO/DMSO system on silicon wafers has been made. The study shows that the cellulose concentration in the solution determines the cellulose film thickness and that the temperature of the solution affects the surface roughness. A lower solution temperature results in a lower surface roughness at cellulose concentrations below 0.8%. Using the described method, it is possible to prepare films with thicknesses of 30-90 nm with a constant surface roughness by changing the cellulose concentration, i.e. by dilution with DMSO. On these films, water has a contact angle less than 20degrees and about 50% of the material can, according to CP/MAS C-13-NMR spectroscopy on corresponding fibrous material, be considered to consist of crystalline cellulose II type material. It has further been shown that AFM can be used to determine the thickness of cellulose films, in both dry and wet states. In this method, the difference in height between the top surface and the underlying wafer has been measured at an incision made into the cellulose film. The cellulose films have also been spin-coated with the same technique as on the silicon oxide wafer onto the crystal in a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). These model films were found to be suitable for swelling measurements with the QCM. The films were very stable during this type of measurement and films with different amounts of charges gave different swelling responses depending on their charges. As expected, films with a higher charge showed a higher swelling.

  • 5. Gunnars, S.
    et al.
    Wågberg, Lars
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Cohen Stuart, M. A.
    Model films of cellulose: I. Method development and initial results2002In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 9, no 3/4, p. 239-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents a new method for the preparation of thin cellulose films. NMMO (N- methylmorpholine- N-oxide) was used to dissolve cellulose and addition of DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) was used to control viscosity of the cellulose solution. A thin layer of the cellulose solution is spin- coated onto a silicon oxide wafer and the cellulose is precipitated in deionised water. The cellulose film is anchored onto the silicon oxide wafer by a saturated polymer layer. Among many different polymers tested, PVAm (polyvinylamine) and G- PAM (glyoxalated- polyacrylamide) worked well. The preparation of cellulose model films described in this paper resulted in films with thicknesses in the range 20- 270 nm and the thickness can be controlled by altering the concentration of cellulose solution by addition of different amounts of DMSO. The films were cleaned in deionised water and were found to be free from solvents by ESCA analysis and contact angle measurements. The molecular weight distribution of the cellulose surface material shows that there is only minor breakdown of the cellulose chains, mainly by cleavage of the longest molecular mass fraction and without creation of low molecular mass oligomers of glucose.

  • 6.
    Hellström, P.
    et al.
    AkzoNobel Pulp and Performance Chemicals, 445 80 Bohus, Sweden.
    Heijnesson-Hultén, A.
    AkzoNobel Pulp and Performance Chemicals, 445 80 Bohus, Sweden.
    Paulsson, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering. AkzoNobel Pulp and Performance Chemicals, 445 80 Bohus, Sweden.
    Håkansson, H.
    Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences, Karlstad University, 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden .
    Germgård, U.
    Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences, Karlstad University, 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden .
    The effect of Fenton chemistry on the properties of microfibrillated cellulose2014In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 1489-1503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fully bleached birch kraft pulp was treated with acidic hydrogen peroxide in the presence of ferrous ions (Fenton's reagent) and thereafter treated mechanically in a colloid mill to produce a product containing microfibrillated cellulose (MFC). The produced MFC products were chemically and morphologically characterized and compared with MFC products produced without pretreatment as well as with enzymatic hydrolysis. Fenton treatment resulted in an increase in total charge and number of carbonyl groups while the intrinsic viscosity decreased. The Fenton treated pulps were easier to process mechanically i.e. they reached a higher specific surface area at a given mechanical treatment time and the MFC produced had a stable water-fibre suspension for at least 8 weeks compared to enzymatic pretreated pulps and pulps not subjected to any pretreatment. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  • 7.
    Mattsson, Amanda
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Uesaka, Tetsu
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Characterisation of time-dependent, statistical failure of cellulose fibre networks2018In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 2817-2828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulosic materials have special advantages for transport packaging, because of their light-weight and recyclable natures and also relatively high specific strength. The strength of such materials is normally evaluated by applying monotonically increasing, quasi-static displacement (or load). However, in real circumstances, the material is subjected to far more complex loading histories, such as creep, fatigue, and random loading. Failures under such circumstances are, not only time-dependent, but also notoriously variable. For example, the coefficient of variation for creep lifetime reaches or even exceeds 100%. The objective of this study is to develop a method to characterise both time-dependent and statistical natures of failures of cellulosic materials. We have used a general formulation of time-dependent, statistical failure, originally proposed by Coleman (J Appl Phys 29(6):968–983, 1958). We have identified three material parameters: (1) characteristic strength, representing short term strength, (2) brittleness parameter (or durability), and (3) Weibull shape parameter related to long-term reliability. These parameters were determined by special protocols of creep and constant loading-rate (CLR) tests for a series of containerboards. Results have shown that these two test methods yield comparable values for the materials parameters. This implies the possibility of replacing extremely time-consuming creep tests with the more time-efficient CLR tests. Comparing the cellulose fibre networks with fibres and composites used for advanced structural applications, we have found that they are very competitive in both reliability and durability aspects with Kevlar and glass-fibre composites.

  • 8.
    Moilanen, Carolina S.
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Systems, Tampere University of Technology.
    Björkqvist, Tomas
    Department of Automation Science and Engineering, Tampere University of Technology.
    Engberg, Birgitta A.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Salminen, Lauri I.
    A Fredrikson Research & Consulting Ltd., Vähäkuja 2 A 2, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Saarenrinne, Pentti
    Department of Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Systems, Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    High strain rate radial compression of Norway spruce earlywood and latewood2016In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 873-889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical properties of Norway spruce were studied and a compression model for mechanical pulping was developed. The split-Hopkinson pressure bar technique was combined with high-speed photography to analyse local radial compression. Data analysis focussed on the differences between mechanical properties of earlywood and latewood. Measurements were conducted at both room temperature and 135 C. The effect of prefatigue treatment was also studied. A simple material model was defined linearly in parts and fitted to the measurement data to quantify the differences. New results were found on the differences in inelastic behaviour of earlywood and latewood at large deformations. In addition, other results were in line with previously published results.

  • 9.
    Osong, Sinke H.
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Engstrand, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Lundberg, Mathias
    PulpEye AB Örnsköldsvik Sweden.
    Reza, Mehedi
    Aalto University, School of Science and Technology, Aalto, Finland.
    Tapani, Vuorinen
    Aalto University, School of Science and Technology, Aalto, Finland.
    Qualitative evaluation of microfibrillated cellulose usingthe crill method and some aspects of microscopy2016In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 3611-3624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been a challenge to develop rapid online characterisation techniques for nanocellulose given the fibrillar structure of the nanoparticles. The crill optical analyser uses optical response signals in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength ranges to evaluate the particle size properties of micro/nanofibrillar cellulosic materials. In this work, the crill analyser was used to measure the projected areas of UV and IR light sources by measuring the light blocked by nanocellulosic particles. This work uses the crill methodology as a new, simplified technique to characterise the particle size distribution of nanocellulosic material based on chemi-thermomechanical pulp (CTMP), thermomechanical pulp (TMP), and sulphite pulp (SP). In the first part, hydrogen peroxide pretreatment of CTMP and TMP in a wing mill refiner followed by high-pressure homogenisation to produce microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) was evaluated using the crill method. In the second part, TEMPO oxidation of CTMP and SP combined with high-shear homogenisation to produce MFC was studied using the crill method. With 4 % hydrogen peroxide pretreatment, the crill values of the unhomogenised samples were 218 and 214 for the TMP and CTMP, respectively, improving to 234 and 229 after 18 homogenisation passes. The results of the TEMPO method indicated that, for the 5 mmol NaClO SP-MFC, the crill value was 108 units at 0 min and 355 units after 90 min of treatment, a 228 % improvement. The CTMP and TMP fibres and the MFC were freeze dried and fibrillar structure of the fibres and microfibrils was visualised using scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy.

  • 10.
    Osong, Sinke Henshaw
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences. Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Engstrand, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Nanofibrillated cellulose/nanographite composite films2016In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 2487-2500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Though research into nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) has recently increased, few studies have considered co-utilising NFC and nanographite(NG) in composite films, and, it has, however been a challenge to use high-yield pulp fibres (mechanical pulps) to produce this nanofibrillar material. It is worth noting that there is a significant difference between chemical pulp fibres and high-yield pulp fibres, as the former is composed mainly of cellulose and has a yield of approximately 50 % while the latter is consist of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, and has a yield of approximately 90 %. NFC was produced by combining TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethypiperidine-1-oxyl)-mediated oxidation with the mechanical shearing of chemi-thermomechanical pulp (CTMP) and sulphite pulp (SP); the NG was produced by mechanically exfoliating graphite. The different NaClO dosages in the TEMPO system differently oxidised the fibres, altering their fibrillation efficiency. NFC-NG films were produced by casting in a Petri dish. We examine the effect of NG on the sheet-resistance and mechanical properties of NFC films. Addition of 10 wt% NG to 90 wt% NFC of sample CC2 (5 mmol NaClO CTMP-NFC homogenised for 60 min) improved the sheet resistance, i.e. from that of an insulating pure NFC film to 180 Omega/sq. Further addition of 20 (CC3) and 25 wt% (CC4) of NG to 80 and 75 wt% respectively, lowered the sheet resistance to 17 and 9 Omega/sq, respectively. For the mechanical properties, we found that adding 10 wt% NG to 90 wt% NFC of sample HH2(5 mmol NaClO SP-NFC homogenised for 60 min) improved the tensile index by 28 %, tensile stiffness index by 20 %, and peak load by 28 %. The film's surface morphology was visualised using scanning electron microscopy, revealing the fibrillated structure of NFC and NG. This methodology yields NFC-NG films that are mechanically stable, bendable, and flexible.

  • 11.
    Osong, Sinke Henshaw
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Engstrand, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Processing of wood-based microfibrillated cellulose and nanofibrillated cellulose, and applications relating to papermaking: a review2016In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 93-123Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As an emerging cellulosic nanomaterial, microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) have shown enormous potential in the forest products industry. The forest products industry and academia are working together to realise the possibilities of commercializing MFC and NFC. However, there are still needs to improve the processing, characterisation and material properties of nanocellulose in order to realise its full potential. The annual number of research publications and patents on nanocellulose with respect to manufacturing, properties and applications is now up in the thousands, so it is of the utmost importance to review articles that endeavour to research on this explosive topic of cellulose nanomaterials. This review examines the past and current situation of wood-based MFC and NFC in relation to its processing and applications relating to papermaking.

  • 12.
    Rundlöf, Mats
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Ström, Helene
    Wågberg, Lars
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Effect of Mannanase and Lipase on the properties of colloidal wood extractives and their interaction with mechanical pulp fines2002In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 127-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of enzymatic treatments of dissolved and colloidal substances (DCS) released from thermomechanical pulp (TMP) have been investigated. A model dispersion of DCS was made by leaching several portions of TMP in distilled water and separating the fibrous material. Some samples were enriched in colloidal particles by removing dissolved substances using ultra-filtration. The DCS, which had been subjected to different enzymatic treatments, were added in a fixed quantity to TMP fines that had been made cationic, and were subsequently used to form handsheets. All DCS additions increased the content of lipophilic extractives in the sheets. Lipase gave a complete hydrolysation of triglycerides into free fatty acids. The untreated DCS gave no significant decrease in tensile strength, because of the relatively small addition. A treatment of the DCS with Lipase gave a higher extractives content and a tensile strength on the same level as the reference. A Mannanase treatment gave a decrease in strength compared with the reference at the same amount of extractives in the sheet. A combined treatment with Mannanase and Lipase gave a more pronounced decrease in tensile strength. Two possible reasons for the differences in strength at a given amount of extractives were suggested: (i) the destabilisation of the colloidal wood extractives due to the Mannanase could affect the distribution of the colloid in the sheet, making it more detrimental to sheet strength compared with the stable colloid. This would account for the observation that Lipase did not affect sheet strength as such, but the combination with Mannanase gave the lowest tensile strength; (ii) the decomposition of galactoglucomannans in aqueous solution would diminish their positive effect on tensile strength and/or affect the adsorption of the colloid. A reflectometry technique was used to quantify the adsorption of the differently treated DCS onto a model surface of the cationic fines. Colloidal wood extractives were identified on the surfaces after adsorption using staining and light microscopy. No variations in adsorbed amounts were found that could explain the differences in sheet strength, which indirectly suggests that the distribution of the colloid over the surface was affecting the ability of a strong bonded joint to be formed between two such surfaces.

  • 13.
    Yang, Jiayi
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Edlund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Lindman, Björn
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    pH-responsive cellulose–chitosan nanocomposite films with slow release of chitosan2019In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 3763-3776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose–chitosan films were preparedusing a physical method in which cellulose andchitosan were separately dissolved via freeze thawingin LiOH/urea and mixed in different proportions, theresulting films being cast and regenerated in water/ethanol. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transforminfrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectroscopy verifiedthe composition changes in the nanocomposites due todifferent mixing ratios between the polymers. Tensilestress–strain measurements indicated that the mechan-ical performance of the cellulose–chitosan nanocom-posites slightly worsened with increasing chitosancontent compared with that of films comprisingcellulose alone. Field emission scanning electronmicroscopy revealed the spontaneous formation ofnanofibers in the films; these nanofibers were subse-quently ordered into lamellar structures. Water uptakeand microscopy analysis of film thickness changesindicated that the swelling dramatically increased atlower pH and with increasing chitosan content, thisbeing ascribed to the Gibbs–Donnan effect. Slowmaterial loss appeared at acidic pH, as indicated by aloss of weight, and quantitative FT-IR analysisconfirmed that chitosan was the main componentreleased.Asample containing 75% chitosan reached amaximum swelling ratio and weight loss of 1500%and 55 wt%, respectively, after 12 h at pH 3. Thestudy presents a novel way of preparing pH-responsivecellulose–chitosan nanocomposites with slow-releasecharacteristics using an environmentally friendlyprocedure and without any chemical reactions.

  • 14.
    Yang, Jiayi
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Duan, Jiangjiang
    Wuhan University, China.
    Zhang, Lina
    Wuhan University, China.
    Lindman, Björn
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Edlund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Spherical nanocomposite particles prepared from mixed cellulose–chitosan solutions2016In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 3105-3115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel cellulose–chitosan nanocomposite particles with spherical shape were successfully prepared via mixing of aqueous biopolymer solutions in three different ways. Macroparticles with diameters in the millimeter range were produced by dripping cellulose dissolved in cold LiOH/urea into acidic chitosan solutions, inducing instant co-regeneration of the biopolymers. Two types of microspheres, chemically crosslinked and non-crosslinked, were prepared by first mixing cellulose and chitosan solutions obtained from freeze thawing in LiOH/KOH/urea. Thereafter epichlorohydrin was applied as crosslinking agent for one of the samples, followed by water-in-oil (W/O) emulsification, heat induced sol–gel transition, solvent exchange, washing and freeze-drying. Characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, total elemental analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the prepared particles as being true cellulose–chitosan nanocomposites with different distribution of chitosan from the surface to the core of the particles depending on the preparation method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction was performed to study the morphology and size distribution of the prepared particles. The morphology was found to vary due to different preparation routes, revealing a core shell structure for macroparticles prepared by dripping, and homogenous nanoporous structure for the microspheres. The non-crosslinked microparticles exhibited a somewhat denser structure than the crosslinked ones, which indicated that crosslinking restricts packing of the chains before and under regeneration. From the obtained volume-weighted size distributions it was found that the crosslinked microspheres had the highest median diameter. The results demonstrate that not only the mixing ratio and distribution of the two biopolymers, but also the morphology and nanocomposite particle diameters are tunable by choosing between the different routes of preparation.

  • 15. Zou, Xuejun
    et al.
    Uesaka, Tetsu
    Gurnagul, Norayr
    Prediction of paper permanence by accelerated aging .2. Comparison of the predictions with natural aging results1996In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 269-279Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Zou, Xuejun
    et al.
    Uesaka, Tetsu
    Norayer, Gurnagul
    Prediction of paper permanence by accelerated aging .1. Kinetic analysis of the aging process1996In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 243-267Article in journal (Refereed)
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