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  • 1.
    Carlerby, Heidi
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Viitasara, Eija
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gillander Gådin, Katja
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    How Bullying Involvement is Associated with the Distribution of Parental Background and With Subjective Health Complaints Among Swedish Boys and Girls2013In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 111, no 3, p. 775-783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to analyze how bullying involvement is associated with the distribution of parental background and with subjective health complaints (SHC) among Swedish boys and girls. Data were collected from the World Health Organization, Health Behavior in School-aged Children (WHO/HBSC) survey, measurement years 1997/1998, 2001/2002 and 2005/2006. A total of 11,972 boys (50.6 %) and girls (49.4 %) in grades five, seven and nine participated in the study. The adolescents were categorized in subgroups according to parental background: Swedish (80.1 %), mixed (10.5 %) and foreign(9.7 %). Multivariate logistic regressions were used to estimate remaining risk of SHC in the categories of bullying involvement. The frequencies of bullying involvement once or more were: none involved (74.8 %), victims (10.6 %), bullies (10.3 %) and bully/victims (4.4 %). Six out of ten involved in bullying were boys. Boys of foreign background were more involved as bullies compared to boys of mixed or Swedish background. Girls of foreign background were more involved in all three categories of bullying than girls of mixed or Swedish background. Increased risk of SHC was estimated among all adolescents involved in bullying, with highest OR in the category of bully/victims, OR 3.95 (CI 3.13–4.97) for the boys and OR 4.51 (CI 4.51–6.40) for the girls. The multivariate models were stable even after adjustment for socio-demographics. There are some associations between bullying involvement and parental background. Regardless of parental background, family affluence, family structure and gender, all adolescents involved in bullying are at increased risk of SHC.

  • 2.
    Galinha, Iolanda Costa
    et al.
    Univ Autonoma Lisboa, P-1100188 Lisbon, Portugal.
    Oishi, Shigehiro
    Univ Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.
    Pereira, Cicero Roberto
    Univ Lisbon, Inst Social Sci, P-1699 Lisbon, Portugal.
    Wirtz, Derrick
    E Carolina Univ, Greenville, NC, USA.
    Esteves, Francisco
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology. Inst Univ Lisboa, CIS Ctr Psychol Res & Social Intervent, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Adult Attachment, Love Styles, Relationship Experiences and Subjective Well-Being: Cross-Cultural and Gender Comparison between Americans, Portuguese, and Mozambicans2014In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 823-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attachment security, love styles, and romantic relationship experiences are closely associated with subjective well-being (SWB). A few studies have empirically observed significant relations between these variables. However, no studies have included all of these predictors to analyze the unique contribution of each to SWB, and no cross-cultural studies have analyzed these variables simultaneously. This article examined (a) the relations between attachment security, love styles, romantic relationship experiences and subjective well-being, (b) the unique contribution of each to predict SWB, and (c) cross-cultural and gender differences in the predictors of SWB across three samples of 1,574 university students: 497 from North Carolina (US), 544 from Maputo (Mozambique), and 533 from Lisbon (Portugal). We found cross-cultural differences in the three samples. The main predictor of SWB was attachment security in the US and Portuguese samples, while in the Mozambican it was eros love style. Storge love style positively predicted SWB in the US and Portuguese samples, but not in the Mozambican. In contrast, mania love style predicted the SWB of Mozambicans but not that of Americans or Portuguese. We found gender similarities and differences: the association between attachment security and SWB was not gender-specific; the associations between love styles, relationship experiences and SWB were gender-specific.

  • 3.
    Hagqvist, Emma
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gillander Gådin, Katja
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Nordenmark, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Work-family conflict and well-being across Europe: The role of gender context2017In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 132, no 2, p. 785-797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analysed whether gender context is important to differences in therelationship between work–family conflict (WFC) and well-being across Europe. Wehypothesised that in countries that support equality in work life and where norms supportwomen’s employment, the relationship between WFC and low well-being is weaker than incountries with less support for gender equality. Cohabiting men and women aged18–65 years from 25 European countries were selected from the European Social Survey.A multilevel analysis was conducted to investigate the relationship between well-being andWFC, and two measurements were used to represent gender context: gender equality inwork life and norms regarding women’s employment. Contrary to the hypothesis, theresults showed that the negative relationship was stronger in countries with high levels ofgender equality in work life and support for women’s employment than in countries with arelatively low level of gender equality in work life and support for traditional genderrelations. The context in which gender is constructed may be important when studying therelationship between WFC and well-being. In addition, emphasis should be placed onpolicies that equalise both the labour market and the work performed at home.

  • 4.
    Warne, Maria
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Gillander Gådin, Katja
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Adaptation and validation of a positive health scale for adolescents2014In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 1079-1093Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a demonstrated need to develop alternative approaches to measuring health from a positive health perspective in order to support systematic planning and evaluation of health promotion in schools. The Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS) aims to measure health from a positive perspective, However, it has not been developed, or previously been tested, for use with adolescents between the ages of 12 and 16, at which age youth often exhibit a need for extra support in order to be successful in school and life. Inspired by the SHIS, we generated a Positive Health Scale (PHS) appropriate for 12-16-year-olds and determined its validity and reliability using principal component analysis (PCA). In the study, the scale was tested in a sample of 1,527 Grade 6-9 students, using PCA. The findings indicated the need to reduce the scale to nine items, which was then shown to be valid and reliable for use with both adolescent boys and adolescent girls. We conclude that the PHS can be used in systematic health promotion planning and evaluation. Communities and schools can use this scale to examine and improve health determinants in different adolescent settings.

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