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  • 1.
    Brown, Patrick R.
    et al.
    Sociology and Anthropology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Olofsson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Risk, uncertainty and policy: towards a social-dialectical understanding2014In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 17, no 4, 425-434 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This editorial introduces a special issue devoted to studies of risk and uncertainty in their relation to policy and policy-making. The special issue comprises a rather diverse collection of six original research articles, each taking up a distinct perspective in scrutinising interfaces between policy, risk and uncertainty. The purpose of this editorial is to present some broader themes in the literature before moving on to sketch out a basic model for dialectically connecting risk and uncertainty to policy, as a basis for relating the respective insights which emerge within the six empirical articles. The editorial concludes with an overview of these six studies which appear in the special issue.

  • 2.
    Giritli Nygren, Katarina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Susanna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Olofsson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Doing and undoing risk: The mutual constitution of risk and heteronormativity in contemporary society2017In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 20, no 3, 418-432 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops the concepts of ‘doing’ and ‘undoing’ risk, a new approach to risk research that echoes the ‘doing gender’ of gender studies. In this way, we combine intersectional and risk theory and apply the new perspective to empirical material. To better explore the doing and undoing, or the performance, of risk, we will refer to practices that simultaneously (re)produce and hide socio-political norms and positions, played out in contemporary, hierarchical relations of power and knowledge. The aim is to develop a theoretical understanding of doing and undoing risk. The study makes use of transcripts from five focus group interviews with men and women, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people of different ages living in Sweden to develop a theory of ‘doing risk’. The doing of risk of our informants takes place within the frame of a hegemonic heteronormativity. The way that risks are perceived and done in everyday life therefore always needs to be read within a frame of prevailing structures of power. This counts for all of us as we are all part of the hegemonic power structures and thereby are both subject to the intersecting doings of risk and performatively reproducing these power structures in practice.

  • 3.
    Olofsson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Commentary: The substitution principle in chemical regulation: a constructive critique2014In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 17, no 5, 573-575 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Olofsson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Trust in cooperative risk management. Uncertainty and scepticism in the public mind2008In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, Vol. 11, no 6, 837-839 p.Article, book review (Other scientific)
  • 5.
    Olofsson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Susanna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Risk perception and risk behaviour in a heterogeneous society: The case of Sweden2013In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Olofsson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Susanna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Views of risk in Sweden: Global fatalism and local control. An empirical investigation of Ulrich Beck´s theory of modern risks.2007In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 10, no 2, 177-196 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ulrich Beck's theory of risk society has been criticised because there is lack of empirical evidence. By comparing people with different life contexts and experiences, the aim of this study was to investigate how these people view risk, and if 'new' risks are perceived differently by different groups in society. Five focus-group interviews were conducted in Sweden, in 2004/05, with people in rural and urban areas, people with a foreign background and experts. The groups consisted of four people each and lasted for two hours. The results show that 'new' risks are not something people worry about; 'risk' is associated with personal experiences and life context. This indicates a traditional or at least modern way of viewing risk, and contradicts the idea of a reflexive view of risk. However, a division between the urban versus the rural-migrant groups appears: the expert-urban groups show a more global - fatalistic strategy to handle of risk, while the rural - migrant group shows a more traditional approach to risk, where control and the local context are in focus.

  • 7.
    Olofsson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Susanna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Vulnerability, values and heterogeneity: One step further to understand risk perception and behaviour2015In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 18, no 1, 2-20 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to investigate differences in risk perception and behaviour among different population groups selected by gender, age, country of birth, disability and sexual orientation in the light of general values and vulnerability. The analyses use data from two Swedish national surveys from 2005 to 2008. People with foreign background perceive controlled and dread risks as a greater threat than do native-born people, but there is no difference in behaviour when general values and vulnerability have been controlled for. Compared to women, men rate known and dread risks as lower, but controlled risks as higher. Further, men’s behaviour is more risk-oriented and less risk-reducing, and homosexuals and bisexuals are more likely than heterosexuals to report risk behaviour. Compared to previous studies of the so-called White Male Effect carried out in the USA, gender does not play a similar role in Sweden. On the contrary, it seems as if gender is of less importance and that the strength of the association varies depending on type of risk or risk behaviour.

  • 8.
    Wall, Erika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Sense-making of risk and role-taking emotions: How young Swedes construe road traffic risk.2014In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 17, no 10, 1285-1299 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to improve our understanding of how young people makesense of traffic risk. The study also aims to contribute to current theory by refining the concept of'sense-making of risk'. The focus, both empirical and theoretical, is on role-taking emotions. In order tochart both the general significance for sense-making of social interaction and the respondentssubjective sense of traffic risk, the present study used both in-depth interviews and focus groupinterviews: the in-depth interviews comprised a total of eleven interviews with as many interviewees,while a total of 36 people were included in the eight focus group interviews. All interviewees wereSwedish residents aged between 16 and 20. It is found that by adopting the perspective afforded by thetheory of emotion, it is possible to extend our knowledge of individual sense-making of risk. Bothprimary emotions and role-taking emotions are central to how young Swedes form theirunderstanding of traffic risk. A focus on role-taking emotions reveals the importance of indirect socialinteraction for the individual's sense-making of risk in general, and adds to our knowledge of theindividual's sense-making of traffic risk in particular.

  • 9.
    Wall, Erika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Structure of meaning and sense-making of risk: An operationalisation of sense-making tested by grouping individuals according to their structure of meaning2011In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 14, no 6, 735-755 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to refine the theory of individual’s sense-making of risk as a product of structure of meaning, and subsequently to test the theory empirically by identifying coherent groups of individuals by means of an operationalisation of each individual’s structure of meaning. To this end a two-step cluster analysis was conducted on a random selection of the Swedish population (N = 778) aged between 16 and 75 that resulted in three groups of individuals: the ‘locally rooted’; the ‘globally minded’; and ‘the cosmopolitan’. An analysis of variation (one-way ANOVA) was then used in a simple test of the viability of the operationalisation. The analysis shows that the three groups of individuals differ in their behavioural patterns in the face of various everyday risks. The article’s principal contribution is the development the theory of the structure of meaning’s role in how individuals sense-make risk. Furthermore, with the analysis and testing inherent in operationalisation, the study is an empirical contribution to the field. In future the structure of meaning would bear closer study, and the operationalisation should be further refined to create a more sensitive gauge of sense-making and its connection with the behavioural patterns associated with various risks.

  • 10.
    Wall, Erika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Visualizing risk: Using participatory photography to explore individuals sense-making of risk2016In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 19, no 3, 347-363 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the field of risk research is increasingly alert to new theoretical and empirical perspectives, it is still the case that few studies take a visual approach, despite its obvious worth in capturing peoples experiences of everyday life. This paper considers how a visual approach can be used to deepen our knowledge of sense-making of risk, particularly young peoples views on risk. It presents empirical findings from a study that uses participatory photography to capture what individuals define as serious risks in everyday life and how these risks are expressed (722 participants in Sweden, aged 5-33, mostly children or adolescents). The conclusion is that focusing on stories embedded in images independently contributes new knowledge about how the individual makes sense of risk in everyday life, and especially that visual methods of data collection and analysis illuminate how individual sense-making of risk is intertwined with other aspects of meaning-making in everyday life. In other words, it is time for a visual turn in risk research.

  • 11.
    Zinn, Jens
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences. School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
    The meaning of risk-taking – key concepts and dimensions2017In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, 1-15 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dealing with and taking risks are central issues of current societies which had been characterised by heightened debates and conflicts about risk (Beck, Giddens). Even though there is good knowledge available, policies and strategies to reduce people’s risk-taking are often less successful than expected. Experts are puzzled about common people not following good advice presuming people’s lack of understanding. While this might be true in many cases a growing body of research shows, rather than being merely ignorant or misinformed, people often have good knowledge when taking risks. A growing body of research provides knowledge about the complexities, dynamics and contradictions of people’s risk-taking. However, there have been little attempts to systematise this body of knowledge. This article contributes to such an enterprise. It suggests distinguishing between different motives for risk-taking, different levels of control and a number of ways how reflexivity about risk is rooted in the social realm. It also explores how risk-taking is part of developing and protecting a valued identity. The article concludes, across different domains there is good evidence for how structural and cultural forces combine and shape risk-taking while people take risks to develop a valued identity and to protect it. Advancing expert’s understanding of risk-taking and change people’s risk-taking require considering and approaching the larger social contexts and individual risk practices in everyday life.

1 - 11 of 11
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