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  • 1.
    Björkman Randström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Wengler, Yvonne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Working with 'hands-off' support: a qualitative study of multidisciplinary teams' experiences of home rehabilitation for older people2014In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 25-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There is a move towards the provision of rehabilitation for older people in their homes. It is essential to ensure that rehabilitation services promote independence of older people.

    Aim

    The aim of the study was to explore multidisciplinary teams' experiences of home rehabilitation for older people.

    Methods

    Five focus groups were conducted with multidisciplinary teams based in a municipality in Sweden, covering seven different professions. In total, 28 participants volunteered to participate in these interviews. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed according to content analysis.

    Results

    Two main categories, as well as four subcategories, emerged. The first main category, having a rehabilitative approach in everyday life, consisted of the subcategories: ‘giving ‘hands-off’ support’ and ‘being in a home environment’. The second main category, working across professional boundaries, consisted of the subcategories: ‘coordinating resources’ and ‘learning from each other’.

    Conclusion

    Common goals, communication skills and role understanding contributed to facilitating the teams' performances of rehabilitation. A potential benefit of home rehabilitation, because the older person is in a familiar environment, is to work a rehabilitative approach into each individual's activity in their everyday life in order to meet their specific needs. At an organisational level, there is a need for developing services to further support older people's psychosocial needs during rehabilitation.

    Implications for practice

    Team performance towards an individual's rehabilitation should come from an emerged whole and not only from the performance of a specific professional approach depending on the traditional role of each profession. A rehabilitative approach is based on ‘hands-off’ support in order to incorporate an individual's everyday activities as a part of their rehabilitation.

  • 2.
    Blusi, Madeleine
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Jong, Mats
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Exploring the influence of Internet-based caregiver support on experiences of isolation for older spouse caregivers in rural areas: a qualitative interview study2015In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 211-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Many older spouse caregivers are tied to the home by their caring duties and feel isolated. The values of supporting older caregivers are well known. In rural areas with long distances and decline in essential services, attending caregiver support groups can be difficult. Using Internet-based services can provide an opportunity for rural caregivers to participate in caregiver support, regardless of geographical distances and without the need for physical presence.

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to explore how Internet-based caregiver support may influence the experience of isolation among older spouse caregivers in rural areas.

    DESIGN: An intervention study where 63 older rural caregivers received an Internet-based caregiver support service.

    METHOD: A qualitative interview study based on 31 interviews with open-ended questions, analysed using latent content analysis.

    FINDINGS: Two themes represent the findings from the study: Expanding the concept of place and Developing networks. Even though participants still spent their days in the house, they experienced that daily life was being spent in a variety of places, both physically, virtually and emotionally. The Internet-based support service provided them with a tool to reconnect with family and develop new friends.

    CONCLUSIONS: Internet-based caregiver support may reduce the experience of isolation for spouse caregivers in rural areas. Nurses played a crucial part in the development, by encouraging, educating and inspiring caregivers and supporting their independence.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Internet-based services ought to be an option for caregiver support in rural areas as it may reduce feelings of isolation for older spouse caregivers.

  • 3.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    et al.
    Högskolan i Nord-Tröndelag.
    Olsen, Rose-Marie
    Högskolen i Nord-Tröndelag.
    Hellzen, Ove
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Management of person with dementia with aggressive and violent behaviour: a systematic literature review.2011In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 153-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    Studies indicate that physical and pharmacological restraints are still often in the frontline of aggression management in a large number of nursing homes. In the present literature review the aim was to describe, from a nursing perspective, aggressive and violent behaviour in people with dementia living in nursing home units and to find alternative approaches to the management of dementia related aggression as a substitute to physical and chemical restraints.

    METHODS:

    A systematic literature review in three phases, including a content analysis of 21 articles published between 1999 and August 2009 has been conducted.

    RESULTS:

    The results could be summarised in two themes: 'origins that may trigger violence' and 'activities that decrease the amount of violent behaviour'. Together, the themes showed that violence was a phenomenon that could be described as being connected to a premorbid personality and often related to the residents' personal care. It was found that if the origin of violent actions was the residents' pain, it was possible to minimise it through nursing activities. This review also indicated that an organisation in special care units for residents who exhibit aggressive and violent behaviour led to the lesser use of mechanical restraints, but also an increased use of non-mechanical techniques.

    CONCLUSION:

    The optimal management of aggressive and violent actions from residents with dementia living in nursing homes was a person-centred approach to the resident. Qualitative studies focusing on violence were sparsely found, and this underlines the importance of further research in this area to elucidate how violence and aggressiveness is experienced and understood by both staff and patients.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    To communicate with people with dementia provides a challenge for nurses and other health caregivers. To satisfy the needs of good nursing care, an important aspect is therefore to get knowledge and understanding about aggressive and violent behaviour and its management.

  • 4.
    Kjällman Alm, Annika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Hellzén, Ove
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Norbergh, Karl-Gustaf
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Experiences of long-term ongoing structured support in early stage of dementia – a case study2014In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 289-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of dementia diseases is increasing worldwide with advancing age and growing populations. In Sweden alone, which currently has a population of approximately 9 million, there are about 25, 000 persons diagnosed each year with a dementia disease. Consequently, after such a diagnosis there is a tremendous need for support not only in Sweden but other countries as well. The recipients of that support include next of kin who seek all sorts of information including conversations about upcoming lifestyle changes and ways to handle personality changes in their loved one who is suffering from dementia. The aim of this study was to explore four couples´ experiences in structured support groups. A single case study with multiple data collection methods was used. Semi-structured interviews were analyzed by content analysis, which revealed three main categories representing the findings in four cases: Kinship through shared experiences, Knowledge about the disease, and Sense of comfort and support. One category, Longing for kinship was created exclusively for one of the couples. Viewing the emerging categories from a healthy aging perspective, both comfort and support and kinship through shared experiences can be considered as components of larger themes of support and social interaction. Findings suggest that structured support groups are a good way to encourage discussions, allow persons with dementia to express themselves, and support healthy aging in partners. Facilitators, regardless of whether they are social workers or registered nurses, should be trained in the group process to enable the individuals in the group to communicate and find meaning in their experiences.

  • 5.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Eriksson, Ulrika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Segerbäck, Inger
    Geriatric and Rehabilitation Unit, Ystad Hospital, Ystad, Sweden.
    Boström, Sara
    Homecare, Östhammar Municipality, Alunda, Sweden.
    Reflections of older people living in nursing homes2014In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 33-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore experiences of ageing in older people living in nursing homes, based on the gerotranscendence theory.

    Method

    Interviews were held with 14 people aged between 80 and 96 years. The results were analysed using content analysis.

    Findings

    The findings were divided into three categories: the self, the cosmic dimension, and social and personal relationships. These three categories were underpinned by eight subcategories. Most participants described improved knowledge about themselves, decreased concern about body and appearance, acceptance and appreciation of life, and less regard for social norms. A fewer participants described a greater affinity with past generations, or thought that the borders between past and present had become blurred.

    Conclusion

    This study provides a better understanding of how people experience old age. It also indicates how healthcare professionals could apply the gerotranscendence theory of ageing as a conversation model to enable care to be adjusted according to older people's wishes.

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