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  • 1.
    Bernhardsson, Jens
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bjärtå, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Changes in Event Related Potentials after exposure therapy for spider phobic individuals2016In: International Journal of Psychophysiology, ISSN 0167-8760, E-ISSN 1872-7697, Vol. 108, p. 105-106Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study was conducted in order to investigate treatment effects in spider phobic individuals on EEG and eye movements. A previous study has shown larger ERP amplitudes in the late positive complex (LPC) post treatment compared to pre treatment during exposure of spider pictures (Leutgeb, Schäfer, & Schienle, 2009). The authors hypothesize that the result might mirror an increase in attention towards the stimuli and reduced attentional avoidance generating enhanced LPC amplitude as a consequence of directing attention to the spider pictures post treatment. In the present study spider fearful individuals (treatment and waitlist group) and control individuals were measured with EEG and Eye tracking during exposure to pictures of spiders, snakes and flowers pre and post treatment. Based on behavioral and self-assessed measures treatment effects were high. Contrary to Leutgeb et al. (2009), our results showed relatively smaller LPC amplitudes post treatment during presentations of spider pictures. Moreover, the eye movement data indicated no avoidance from spider pictures compared to other pictures, neither pre nor post treatment. These results indicate that when individuals attend to visual threat stimuli, LPC amplitude differences follow the pattern of emotional significance and attention allocation.

  • 2.
    Costa, Rui
    et al.
    Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias, Portugal.
    Esteves, Francisco
    Instituto Superior de Ciências do Trabalho e da Empresa, Portugal.
    Skin conductance responses to visual sexual stimuli2008In: International Journal of Psychophysiology, ISSN 0167-8760, E-ISSN 1872-7697, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 64-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research showed that the asymmetrical direction of bilateral skin conductance responses (SCRs) remains constant regardless of task (with larger left SCRs in men and larger right SCRs in women). However, SCRs are controlled ipsilaterally by structures also associated with sexual arousal, hence it could be expected that larger right SCRs are specifically elicited by sexual stimuli. In order to test the two competing hypotheses, left and right SCR magnitude to three stimulus categories (sexually explicit, sexually non-explicit and neutral) were compared in 54 subjects (27 females). The direction of the asymmetry remained constant across stimulus types, however, unexpected sex differences occurred, as males had larger right SCRs and there was no lateralization in females. Interestingly, this interaction disappeared after controlling for indicators of subjective sexual arousal, suggesting that a specific (not previously hypothesized) processing of sexual information could take place.

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