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  • 1.
    Eliasson, Nina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Science Education and Mathematics.
    Karlsson, Karl Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Science Education and Mathematics.
    Lenner, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Specialpedagogiska myndigheten.
    Boys' and Girls' written responses to PISA science questions2017In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 149-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the first time student responses to science questions from the Swedish PISA 2006 Main Study and the PISA 2015 Field Trial have been used in order to investigate differences in boys’ and girls’ written responses. Students’ correct and incorrect answers to the science questions are studied with respect to response length, the number of everyday words used, and the inclusion of nouns and long words in the responses. The results reveal that girls give longer and denser correct responses to most of the questions, compared to boys. The difference in response length cannot be explained by girls’ excessive use of the most common Swedish words, since boys and girls use the same proportion of these words. For incorrect answers the only difference between boys and girls is in the response length, since girls give longer answers than boys.

  • 2.
    Oscarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Jidesjö, Anders
    Karlsson, Karl Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Strömdahl, Helge
    Science for all or science for some: What Swedish science students want to learn about in secondary science and technology and their opinions on science lessons.2009In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 213-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents Swedish results from ‘the Relevance of Science Education’ (ROSE) study, which is a large world wide comparative research project based at the University of Oslo. The Swedish sample consisted of 751 students, most of whom were 15 years old, from 29 schools and data were collected inspring 2003. Student opinions about science lessons are presented in relation to enrolment intentions for upper secondary school together with what they want to learn about in science and technology.The findings indicate that secondary science instruction seems to address only a minority of the students, those that have chosen science or technology in their further education. At the same time, all students have interest in science and technology and many seem most interested in some important issues in societal development. The results are discussed from the perspective of learners and contribute to the debate about establishing a scientific literacy approach in compulsory education.

  • 3.
    Oscarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Jidesjö, Anders
    Strömdahl, Helge
    Karlsson, Karl Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Science in society or science in school: Swedish secondary teachers' beliefs about science and science lessons compared with what their students want to learn2009In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 18-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This article presents comparisons concerned with secondary school science teachers’ and their students’

    beliefs about science and technology and also what science content secondary science teachers

    teach and what their students want to learn. Student data are part of the Relevance of Science Education

    (ROSE) study and the teacher data are part of an extensive study carried out only in Sweden. The

    results indicate that both secondary science teachers and their students are optimistic about science

    and technology as essential parts of societal development. When content from these knowledge fields

    is considered for instruction, significant disparities exist between what teachers teach and what their

    students want to learn. Additional results concerning the secondary science teachers’ beliefs, ‘out-ofschool

    experiences’, ‘Science Technology and Society’ (STS) approaches and ‘inquiry-based instruction’

    are pointed out as important for the development of science instruction in secondary schools. The

    results are discussed in the contexts of students’ voices and teachers’ beliefs.

  • 4.
    Oscarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Karlsson, Karl Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Health Care or Atom Bombs: Interest profiles in science among 15-year old students in Sweden2011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 190-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ROSE survey explores which science topics 15-year-old students want to study. By carrying out a factor analysis on results from Sweden it was possible to describe ten interest profiles. The interest profile with the strongest connection to the students’ interest in school science consists of topics such as explosive chemicals, ABC weapons, electric shocks, atoms and molecules. Only a minority of the students has these interests, but it is this minority who appreciates school science and who chooses to study science at upper secondary school. The factor analysis also reveals large differences between genders and furthermore, that the students’ own interests govern their choice of study programme at upper secondary school.

  • 5.
    Oskarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Science Education and Mathematics.
    Eliasson, Nina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Science Education and Mathematics.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Science Education and Mathematics.
    Verkliga vardagssammanhang i årskurs 4 eller kontextlös kunskap i årskurs 8?: Everyday life context in grade 4 or knowledge without context in grade 82017In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 36-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International comparisons of students’ knowledge as TIMSS and PISA have shown that Swedish students' knowledge of science deteriorated during the 2000s, compared to both previous years and to other countries. In grade 4, however, the results improved between 2007 and 2011 and Sweden is one of the countries showing the greatest difference between the results in grade 4 and grade 8, suggesting a weak knowledge development in science between these grades.

    This study compares Swedish pupils' results for individual tasks in Science in TIMSS 2011 with an average score of countries in the EU or OECD. The items are classified by whether they are put in a context and if they ask for school specific knowledge or if they could be solved with knowledge from sources outside school. A large proportion of the items in grade 4 is linked to a context and to students' everyday lives, which explains the good results for the younger students.  Few items in grade 8 are of interest for the students or linked to students' daily lives and on these items Swedish students often perform below average for the EU / OECD, which contributes to the less favorable outcome in grade 8. The weak development of knowledge between grades 4 and 8 that is indicated by TIMSS suggests that the formalized science classes in school do not reach the students and it points to the need for a clearer connection to students' interests and experiences.

  • 6.
    Åström, Maria
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Using hierarchical linear models to test differences in Swedish results from OECD's PISA 2003: Integrated and Subject-specific science education2007In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, no 2, p. 121-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possible effects of different organisations of the science curriculum in schools participating in PISA 2003 are tested with a hierarchical linear model (HLM) of two levels. The analysis is based on science results. Swedish schools are free to choose how they organise the science curriculum. They may choose to work subject-specifically (with Biology, Chemistry and Physics), integrated (with Science) or to mix these two. In this study, all three ways of organising science classes in compulsory school are present to some degree. None of the different ways of organising science education displayed statistically significant better student results in scientific literacy as measured in PISA 2003. The HLM model used variables of gender, country of birth, home language, preschool attendance, an economic, social and cultural index as well as the teaching organisation.

1 - 6 of 6
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