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  • 1.
    Dahlström, Helene
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Digital writing tools from the student perspective: Access, affordances, and agency2019In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 1563-1581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Along with digital development, new possibilities for communicating have emerged. The younger generation has adopted these new possibilities to a great extent. In order to be able to utilise the opportunities offered by digital tools when writing, access to digital tools is essential. Schools need to develop a writing education that meets students’ contemporary writing needs. In considering this, it is important to learn more about the gains and the losses in digital writing. The purpose of this study was to understand and discuss the relation between students’ digital access, students’ per- ceived affordances with digital writing, and student agency. The methods used were a statistical survey and qualitative interviews. Six classes from five different schools located in a municipality in the middle of Sweden were chosen as an informant group. The results indicate that the most common condition concerning students’ digital access was that students shared digital tools for writing with their families. An analysis of affordances was carried out to interpret the empirical findings from the qualitative data. Affordances that emerged were: write-ability, edit-ability, story-telling ability and accessibility. In addition, the ways in which digital access and the affordances per- ceived can be related to student agency were analysed. The main conclusion was that given the conditions of digital access and opportunities to practice, the affordances of digital writing can increase student agency. In turn, this suggests that writing education that focuses on student agency can contribute to equity in writing activities.

  • 2.
    Fredriksson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Jedeskog, Gunilla
    Linköpings universitet.
    Plomp, Tjeerd
    University of Twente, the Netherlands.
    Innovative use of ICT in schools based on the findings in ELFE project2008In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 83-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European eLearning Forum for Education (ELFE) is a project initiated by the ETUCE (European Trade Union Committee on Education). An important objective of the project has been to study good experiences with implementing the use of ICT in schools. This objective has been broken down in seven operational research questions. Three of these questions will be discussed in this article: 1) What difference does the use of ICT make in schools where ICT is intensively used for instructional/pedagogical purposes? 2) How are the students influenced by this different way of teaching as compared to the traditional classroom education, both individually and as a collective? 3) What factors influence the intensive pedagogical use of ICT?

    The ELFE study applied a case study approach. Three innovative schools in each of five European countries (Denmark, England, Germany, Norway and Portugal) were purposively selected. Data were collected via questionnaires, interviews, observations and school documents.

    The findings resulting from the ELFE schools case studies illustrate that the implementation of ICT for teaching and learning may influence the functioning of schools in a number of ways. One can also conclude that students like working with computers and that they have no ‘instrumental’ problems. A number of factors seem to influence the successful implementation of ICT at school level such as a good infrastructure, a clear vision, policy and strategy. A crucial factor is support from national, regional and local authorities, as well as from the school leadership and parents.

  • 3.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    et al.
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Jaldemark, Jimmy
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Institution of education.
    How and why do students of higher education participate in online seminars?2012In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 253-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Online education is continuing to gain popularity in educational institutions and organizations. Hitherto, most research has occurred at aggregated levels, while few researchers have studied how and why individuals participate in online education. It is essential to examine individual perceptions and relationships in order to understand how students behave in relation to others. This paper investigates how students of higher education participate in online seminars and why they participate in certain ways. An online class that attended asynchronous and synchronous online seminars was studied. Electronic logs were used to examine how students participated and interviews were used to illustrate why they participated. It was revealed that the participation of students varied between aspects such as exchanging information, managing tasks and providing social support and the emphasis of these aspects were related to the tool they communicated through. A number of participation inhibitors were identified and it was also suggested how these inhibitors can be addressed.

  • 4.
    Jaldemark, Jimmy
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Participation and genres of communication in online settings of higher education2008In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 129-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on written utterances in online settings of higher education. It concerns the constitution of the initiation, turn taking and the steering of exchanges of utterances; and it describes these patterns in terms of different genres. The study also concerns participation in higher education and, specifically, participation in educational settings where students and teachers rarely meet face-to-face. Their participation is thus dependant on written utterances in online settings. Overall, this paper discusses constitutive aspects of these written utterances. The educational communication between students and teachers embraced both behaviourist and constructivist genres. The distinction between these two genres relates to the functionality of the utterances, the main metaphor for learning and the responsibilities for the communication taken by students and teachers. The emergence of these genres seems to be affected by interplay between the composition of the study-groups, the structure of the task and other aspects of participation through online settings.

  • 5.
    Pettersson, Fanny
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    Umeå universitet, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Implementing distance teaching at a large scale in medical education: a struggle between dominant and non-dominant teaching activities2013In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 359-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines possibilities and challenges when implementing distance teaching of theoretical content in a regionalized medical program (RMP). It will be argued that Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) and the concepts of dominant and non-dominant activities, including conflicts and transitional actions, can lead to an understanding of the distance teaching implementation process. The concepts further provide a theoretical lens through which one can understand the complex relationship between the established and historically rooted, face-to-face teaching activity and the new non-dominant distance teaching activity introduced in the educational setting. Data in the study was collected through an online survey, log data, observations, and in-depth interviews. During the analysis, conflicts between the dominant face-to-face teaching and non-dominant distance teaching activity were identified, and they partly inhibited medical teachers at the program from adopting and developing distance teaching. By illustrating transitional actions as small, innovative bottom-up solutions, further analysis revealed how medical teachers tried to overcome those conflicts to facilitate the adoption and development of distance teaching. The non-dominant distance teaching activity, even if not fully adopted, actually influenced and facilitated change in educational practice. The discussion argues that understanding the implementation of a non-dominant teaching activity in medical education in terms of mere success or failure is not fruitful. Instead, we should strive for sensitivity by closely analyzing the implementation process as interplay between dominant and non-dominant teaching activities. Such sensitivity will make it possible to cultivate future educational development and change.

  • 6.
    Rasmusson, Maria
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Eklund, Monica
    Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    “It’s easier to read on the Internet—you just click on what you want to read...”: Abilities and skills needed for reading on the Internet2013In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 401-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s youth spend a lot of time on the Internet where they meet a multimodal world. The focus in the present study has been on the skills and abilities needed for on-line reading. This study explores reading on the Internet, with pairs of Swedish students aged 10 and 15. The pairs completed tasks on the Internet and these sessions were video-taped. Five main categories of skills and abilities were found: traditional literacy, multimodal literacy, path-finding, IT abilities, and information abilities. The results support earlier research in the field at large, and also add to the literature on on-line reading, in areas such as the crucial need for the ability to spell and knowing web address conventions in English. 

  • 7.
    Sundgren, Marcus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Blurring Time And Place In Higher Education With Bring Your Own Device Applications: A Literature Review2017In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 3081-3119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of mobile devices is increasing rapidly in society, and student device ownership is becoming more or less ubiquitous in many parts of the world. This might be an under-utilised resource that could benefit the educational practices of institutions of higher education. This review examines 91 journal articles from 28 countries published in the years of 2009–2015 with regards to the applications of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) in higher education to take inventory of how it is applied where blurring of boundaries of time and place can be observed, and to observe problems or obstacles regarding these applications. Research interests do not seem to shift, as much as they are becoming more diverse. The five applications that were identified in 2009 were in discussion during all of the examined years, whereas the total number of applications in discussion increased to 12 in 2015. A methodological concern with regard to trend analysis is that more than half of the articles lack a stated year of data collection. As this can differ greatly from the year of publication, any trend analysis will be burdened with uncertainty. That said, a pattern that emerges is a shift away from distribution of content towards social networking applications. Much less focus has been placed on obstacles and problems in later years, but some areas that have been addressed are usability problems due to small screens and keyboards, with costs of devices and data plans making ownership unfeasible for certain activity types or groups of students. 

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