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  • 1.
    Beden, Nadja
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Applying Critical Literacy in Reading Literature: Interpreting and Linking "The Most Dangerous Game" and Cast Away to Colonial and Postcolonial Ideas in a Swedish Upper Secondary Class2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2.
    Castellanos, Michaela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Star Trek IV and Environmental Risk: Balancing on Irony's Edge2016In: America After Nature: Democracy, Culture, Environment / [ed] Catrin Gersdorf and Juliane Braun, Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Winter, 2016, p. 391-404Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3. Dagerman, Stig
    et al.
    Hartman, Steven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Our Need for Consolation is Insatiable2013In: Little Star: a journal of poetry and prose, ISSN 2158-5830, Vol. 5, p. 301-307Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In 1951 Swedish writer Stig Dagerman wrote an autobiographical essay titled "Our Need for Consolation is Insatiable." It is a remarkable poetic meditation on the life-and-death stakes of the literary imagination from a writer who was likely suffering from an undiagnosed bipolar disorder, fighting for his life through one depressive episode after another. Written when his critical reputation and fame as Sweden’s greatest new literary phenom had been firmly established following a remarkable outpouring of critically acclaimed work in the late 1940s, the essay marked a point in time when the tides had turned for Dagerman, who now struggled with the opposite of this productive streak in the form of a debilitating bout of writer’s block that would eventually contribute to his suicide two years later. "Our Need for Consolation is Insatiable" lays bare the writer’s fragile psyche, not only his faltering ego but his selfless and far from sure-footed ambition to offer something of lasting beauty and meaning to a world indifferent to his very existence. While writing the essay, Dagerman managed to rise temporarily from the depths of his depression and identify the sources of his own consolation and hope in terms that have continued to resonate powerfully with many readers, and fellow writers, over the following 60 years. Originally published in 1952 in the improbable venue of Husmodern (a magazine dedicated to home economics for Swedish housewives, analogous to American magazines like Good Housekeeping or Better Homes and Gardens), the essay was a profound response to a trivial commission from the magazine’s editors, who asked Dagerman to send them “something on the art of living.” The soul- and psyche-searching tour de force that Dagerman composed was not likely what the editors had in mind, but to their credit—and also possibly owing to his celebrity—they published the essay as written. The essay has since been translated into 10 languages and published / reprinted a great many times. This is the first literary translation of the essay into English.

  • 4. Dagerman, Stig
    et al.
    Hartman, Steven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    "The Stockholm Car"2013In: Agni Magazine, ISSN 0191-3352Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    English translation of short story by Swedish author Stig Dagerman (1923-1954) about impoverished children in Depression-Era rural Sweden and the shame of being invisible.

  • 5. Dagerman, Stig
    et al.
    Hartman, Steven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    McDermott, Alice
    Johns Hopkins University.
    Sleet: Selected Stories by Stig Dagerman: Translated from the Swedish by Steven Hartman, with a preface by Alice McDermott2013 (ed. 1st)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stig Dagerman (1923–1954) was regarded as the most talented young writer of the Swedish post-war generation. By the 1940s, his fiction, plays, and journalism had catapulted him to the forefront of Swedish letters, with critics comparing him to William Faulkner, Franz Kafka, and Albert Camus. His suicide at the age of thirty-one was a national tragedy. This selection, containing a number of new translations of Dagerman's stories never before published in English, is unified by the theme of the death of innocence. Often narrated from a child's perspective, the stories give voice to childhood's tender state of receptiveness and joy tinged with longing and loneliness.

  • 6.
    Hartman, Steven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Critical Introduction to "To Kill a Child" by Stig Dagerman: [The Art of Coming in Time]2014In: The New York review of books, ISSN 0028-7504, E-ISSN 1944-7744Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Hartman, Steven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    How Nordic Interdisciplinary Scholarship Has Helped Set the Tone for an Emerging Environmental Humanities Research Area in Europe: Keynote presentation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure and agendas of European research are undergoing a sea change. One example of this shift is the next multi-annual framework for research and innovation in Europe, Horizon 2020, which has proposed structuring research funding into interdisciplinary blocks defined in terms of “societal challenges.” A new role for the Social Sciences and Humanities is being envisaged within this forthcoming (eighth) framework, emphasizing greater prominence and integration of work from these areas in the overall organization of European research. Directly preceding the VIII NIES symposium in Pori, the Lithuanian Presidency of the EU has dedicated an entire conference, “Horizons for Social Sciences and Humanities,” to the goals of eliciting consultations from stakeholders within the European research community and advising the responsible European agencies on the shaping of Social Sciences and Humanities agendas in “Horizon 2020.” The main outcome of the meeting will be the “Vilnius Declaration on Horizons for Social Sciences and Humanities,” to presented by the EU Lithuanian Presidency to the European Commission before the framework undergoes final refinements leading up the program’s launch in 2014. A number of research interests and focuses are likely to be woven into the fabric of this declaration, and among these the emerging interdisciplinary area of the Environmental Humanities can and should be a significant component. To this end an alliance of strong European research centers and networks has been formed to identify and articulate the strategic challenges, goals and wider relevance of an emerging Environmental Humanities research community in Europe. Nordic researchers from a wide range of disciplines and study areas within the Humanities are playing a key role in the realization of this agenda, just as they have helped to lay the groundwork for this emerging research area. This talk traces the trajectory of Nordic research initiatives in the environmental humanities in recent years, highlighting in particular how an intensification of scholarly activity in the Nordic countries has contributed to the wider development of this field internationally. The state of the field is also addressed, both globally and within the European context.

  • 8.
    Hartman, Steven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    The Inscribing Environmental Memory Project2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research clusters within the Nordic Network for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies (NIES), the North Atlantic Biocultural Organization (NABO) and the Global Human Ecodynamics Alliance (GHEA), in cooperation with partner networks in the USA, the UK and the Nordic countries, have undertaken a major interdisciplinary research initiative that aims to examine environmental memory in the medieval Icelandic sagas, with a prominent focus on historical processes of environmental change and adaptation. The medieval Sagas of Icelanders constitute one key corpus, among other literary and documentary corpora, to be investigated in this initiative. Anchored in traditional fields of study (e.g. saga studies and various medieval-studies fields) as well as newer and emerging fields (e.g. integrated history and historical ecology, ecocriticism, digital and environmental humanities, etc.), the initiative brings together literary scholars, anthropologists, archaeologists, historians, geographers, digital humanities specialists and environmental and life scientists in a coordinated set of sub-projects. The initiative seeks to foreground evidence of changing environmental conditions in Iceland, Greenland and Scandinavia from the late Iron Age through the pre-Industrial period, with a guiding focus on long-term human ecodynamics and the relations among ecological change and adaptation, on the one hand, and resource management, social organization/conflict and resilience on the other. Numerous IEM workshops organized by NIES, NABO, GHEA and various university networks are taking place in 2013 in Sweden, Scotland and Iceland. This talk briefly sketches how this initiative began and how it has developed over the past year. More importantly, it looks ahead to where we expect IEM to be heading in the next year and beyond.

  • 9.
    Hartman, Steven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    The Role of Integrated Humanities and Social Sciences within the new paradigm of research on Global Environmental Change: A Keynote Presentation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Keynote presentation on the Role of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Global Environmental Change (GEC) research delivered at the 2013 GHEA Open Workshop, University of Maryland, 4 Novmeber 2013.

  • 10.
    Hartman, Steven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    "To Kill a Child" by Stig Dagerman: [Translated from the Swedish by Steven hartman]2014In: The New York review of books, ISSN 0028-7504, E-ISSN 1944-7744Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Hartman, Steven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Unpacking the Black Box: the need for Integrated Environmental Humanities (IEH)2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The circumstances that have given rise to the Anthropocene concept require that we reassess our assumptions about human agency and human effects on the earth system. Human activities, and thus human choices, clearly lie at the root of the great environmental predicament of our age, which is not primarily an ecological crisis, though its ramifications are far reaching within ecological systems. Rather, it is a crisis of culture. If the humanities "are a unique repository of knowledge and insight into the rich diversity of the human experience" from which we learn to make sense of our "responses, motivations and actions" in the face of challenges, then it is risky to omit humanities knowledge from scientific assessment and consultation processes informing environmental policy.

    The complete article is available for free viewing on the Future Earth site: bit.ly/1QoHPeC .

  • 12.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    University of Bonn.
    A Saga for Dinner: Landscape and Nationality in Icelandic Literature2011In: Ecozona, ISSN 2171-9594, E-ISSN 2171-9594, Vol. 2, p. 61-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iceland’s attempted industrialisation through an expansion of hydropower and aluminium smelters can lead to a significant reshaping of the country’s landscapes. There has been considerable resistance against such plans since the 1970s, culminating in the debate about the Kárahnjúkar project between 2001 and 2006. The book Draumalandið. Sjálfshjálparbók handa hræddri þjóð [Dreamland. A Self-Help Manual for a Frightened Nation] by the writer Andri Snær Magnason has been particularly influential. It combines ecological consciousness with an appreciation of Iceland‘s literary tradition and history. Thus it displays a view of landscape which connects nature preservation closely to cultural achievements and to national sovereignty. This perception of landscape originates from the assumption that Iceland experienced a golden age from the beginning of colonisation in the Viking age until the subordination under the Norwegian and later Danish kings in the 13th century, which led to an all-embracing degeneration. Nationalist poets such as Jónas Hallgrímsson in the 19th century based their demands for independence on Iceland‘s medieval saga literature and the country‘s landscapes. These seemed to provide evidence for a high culture in unity with nature during the time of the Commonwealth. Although the historical reliability of the sagas is doubtful, they are still used as an important argument in Draumalandið. Now the narratives as such are put in the foreground, as they can give value and meaning to the landscapes and places they describe. Thus a turn from a realistic to a more constructivist perception of landscape can be observed in contemporary Icelandic environmental literature.

  • 13.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Aus der Vergangenheit lernen?: Die Bedeutung der mittelalterlichen isländischen Literatur für die Umweltdiskussion der Gegenwart2015In: Culturescapes Island: Zwischen Sagas und Pop / [ed] Culturescapes, Basel: Merian , 2015, p. 45-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14. Hennig, Reinhard
    Að skipta um skoðun.: Jarðnæði Oddnýjar Eirar Ævarsdóttur í samhengi umhverfisverndar-bókmennta2012In: Spássían, ISSN 1670-8709, Vol. 10, p. 35-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    University of Bonn.
    Book review of Subhankar Banerjee (red.): Arctic Voices. Resistance at the Tipping Point2013In: Ecozona, ISSN 2171-9594, E-ISSN 2171-9594, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 142-144Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Climate Change Denial in Literary Fiction. Gert Nygårdshaug’s ’eco-thriller’ Chimera2017In: REAL : the yearbook of research in English and American literature, ISSN 0723-0338, Vol. 33, p. 191-215Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Collapse or Continuity? Norwegian Climate Change Fiction from the 1970s to Present-Day2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Constructing Collective Environmental Memory: Representations of Scarcity and Abundance in Medieval Icelandic Literature2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    University of Bonn.
    Das Lachen der Könige in den altnordischen ‚Konunga sögur‘2012In: Valenzen des Lachens in der Vormoderne 1250-1750 / [ed] Christian Kuhn; Stefan Bießenecker, Bamberg: Univ. of Bamberg Press , 2012, p. 385-411Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Deep-Frozen Hope in the Arctic: The Svalbard Global Seed Vault2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    University of Bonn.
    Ecocritical Realism: Nature, Culture, and Reality in Icelandic Environmental Literature2013In: Realisms in Contemporary Culture: Theories, Politics, and Medial Configurations / [ed] Dorothee Birke and Stella Butter, Berlin; Boston: Walter de Gruyter, 2013, p. 109-123Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Environmental Scarcity and Abundance in Medieval Icelandic Literature2015In: RCC Perspectives, ISSN 2190-5088, no 2, p. 37-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Can medieval Scandinavian literary texts tell us anything about the environmental conditions and the availability of natural resources in premodern times? This essay discusses some of the challenges of reconstructing past environments based on texts that make heavy use of genre conventions and literary devices such as symbolism, metaphor, and allegory. Environmental scarcity and abundance play an important role in both the Sagas of Icelanders and the Bishops' Sagas. Although the descriptions are not entirely historically accurate, they can shed valuable light on the ways humans of the past have perceived and dealt with problems of scarcity and environmental change.

  • 23. Hennig, Reinhard
    Framtíðin er nú. Um skáldsögu Anna eftir Jostein Gaarder2013In: Spássían, ISSN 1670-8709, Vol. 12, p. 32-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Golden Age and Environmental Change in Medieval Icelandic Literature2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    University of Bonn.
    "It is Immoral to Be a Pessimist": Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in Norwegian Literary Fiction2013In: Tvergastein, ISSN 1893-5605, E-ISSN 1893-5834, Vol. 3, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Klimatförändringar som litterärt motiv och etiskt gränsöverskridande2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Mittelalterliche Ökologie? Vormoderne literarische Texte als Quellen der Umweltforschung2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Natural Resources, Sustainability and Environmental Change in Medieval Icelandic Literature2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Naturens undergång? Litteratur och litteraturvetenskap i antropocen2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    No Future and No Past? How the Anthropocene Changes Environmentalist Narratives2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural criticism since Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s time is usually characterized by a triadic structure: (1) It criticizes its own present. (2) It refers to a reconstructed, idealized past. (3) It searches for alternatives in order to create a better future. This structure has also been characteristic of most environmentalist narratives since the ‘ecological turn’ around 1970. At this time, the future seemed still to be open, so that solutions to environmen-tal problems would be achievable in time. Today, however, the insight that irreversible, human-induced environmental change on a geological scale has already taken place – that the Holocene has ended and we are now living in the ‘Anthropocene’ – fundamentally challenges the triadic structure of both environmentalist fiction and nonfiction. Based on recent examples from literature and film, I will therefore illustrate how the Anthropocene and its implications change not only environmental consciousness as a whole, but also contemporary environmentalist narratives.

  • 31.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    The Construction of Environmental Memory in the Icelandic Sagas2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    University of Bonn.
    The Origins of the “Regime of Goodness”. : Remapping the Cultural History of Norway2013In: EDGE – A Graduate Journal for German and Scandinavian Studies, Vol. 3, no 1Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Traumland unter Wasser: Umweltschutz auf Isländisch2012In: Norrøna : Zeitschrift für Kultur, Geschichte und Politik der Skandinavischen Länder, ISSN 0932-2787, Vol. 45, p. 50-61Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Hennig, Reinhard
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Writing as Climate Activism: Environmental Counterculture in Recent Literary Fiction2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35. Hennig, Reinhard
    et al.
    Simek, Rudolf
    Sagas aus Island: Von Wikingern, Berserkern und Trollen2011Book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Proitsaki, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Empowering Strategies at Home in the Works of Nikki Giovanni and Rita Dove2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the presence of Black women characters in domestic contexts in the early poetry of African American poets Nikki Giovanni and Rita Dove and examines the strategies these women employ, individually and in close relationships, in order to empower themselves and sustain those around them. It provides a joint exploration of the work of two major contemporary poets from a literary and interdisciplinary perspective, mapping instances of the poetic expression of Black feminist politics. The theoretical approach builds on a range of understandings of empowerment, strategy, and the central importance of home in an African American context, as conceptualized primarily in the work of Black feminists, in particular Patricia Hill Collins and bell hooks. Structurally, the study follows the cycle of a woman’s life from girlhood to old age. Thus, poems involving the empowerment strategies of girls at home are explored first. They are followed by poems where the domestic lives of adult women and then elderly women are addressed, with a focus on their respective empowering strategies. Discussed last are strategies of empowerment evident in the interactions of (largely) Black women of different generations in poems depicting intergenerational contacts and relationships.

    Homeplaces created by Black women have historically been experienced as sheltering African Americans from the perils of the dominant white society and thereby Black women’s domestic experiences have generally been linked to privilege rather than to confinement and victimization. In the poems, when at home, Black women utilize different strategies to assert themselves and each other, implicitly or explicitly, emerging strong and resilient, even though sometimes they may merely derive satisfaction from their poor circumstances. Strong connections to the past and a sense of belonging, partaking in legacies and storytelling, as well as memory, imagination, dreaming and hiding, are recurring elements of their empowerment processes. However, their enjoyment of loving bonds and their sharing of African-derived knowledges and ways of being emerge as the most significant aspects contributing to their empowerment.

  • 37.
    Pudney, Eric
    Lund University.
    Chorus and Stance in Early Modern English Drama2014In: Subjectivity and Epistemicity: Corpus, Discourse, and Literary Approaches to Stance, Lunds Universitet , 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Pudney, Eric
    Lund University.
    Christianity and Cormac McCarthy's The Road2015In: English Studies: A Journal of English Language, ISSN 0013-838X, E-ISSN 1744-4217, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 293-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cormac McCarthy's The Road takes place not before or during but after the end. The novel follows a man and his son as they seek to survive in what remains of the world after some unspecified cataclysmic event. There is almost nothing left: no society, no food, no animals, no hope. Many readers will feel that the question the novel poses is why anyone would wish to continue living under such circumstances. But although that question might be more urgent post-apocalypse, it is in fact one that can always be asked: what, if anything, makes human life valuable and worthwhile? The novel provides answers to these questions, but these answers are contradictory. The reader is left with a choice between powerful arguments for both faith and despair. In The Road, hope is associated with Christianity and hopelessness with an atheistic understanding of the world. Nonetheless, the novel makes it clear that faith is no easy option. This article will begin by discussing the importance of Christian imagery in the novel, focusing on the key symbolic dimensions of fire and darkness, before going on to show how both Christian and atheistic readings are not only made possible, but actively put forward by the text. It will be argued that the novel presents a powerful challenge to both Christian and atheistic views of the world, without ever actually rejecting either.

  • 39.
    Pudney, Eric
    Lund University.
    Mendacity and Kingship in Shakespeare's Henry V and Richard III2015In: European Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1382-5577, E-ISSN 1744-4233, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 163-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shakespeare’s Henry V and Richard III both practise mendacity, but while Henry V celebrates Henry’s capacity for deceit, the king’s lies are condemned in Richard III. The plays show how similar patterns of behaviour in early modern England could be represented as either virtuous or evil by means of rhetoric, while the similar behaviour of the two kings suggests a broad awareness of the necessity of deceit as a political skill. These two plays also draw attention to their own rhetorical distortions in ways which have appeared troubling to many modern critics, but which exemplify humanist ideas about education through rhetorical ‘lies’.

  • 40. Pudney, Eric
    Paradox and the Preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray2012In: The Wildean, no 40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Pudney, Eric
    Lunds universitet.
    Scepticism and Belief in Witchcraft Drama, 1538-16812016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Pudney, Eric
    Lunds universitet.
    Scepticism and Belief in Witchcraft Drama, 1538-16812019Book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Siméus, Jenny
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö.
    Collaboratively Writing a Self: Textual Strategies in Margaret McCord's The Calling of Katie Makanya: A Memoir of South Africa2015In: Research in African Literatures, ISSN 0034-5210, E-ISSN 1527-2044, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 70-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes The Calling of Katie Makanya (1995) by Margaret McCord as a collaborative autobiography. Katie’s motive for wanting her story to be told is not a desire to find her own voice and identity through narration, but seemingly rather to add to and complete the picture presented in the narrative My Patients Were Zulus (1946), written by Katie’s employer and Margaret McCord’s father, Dr. James B. McCord. Moreover, Margaret McCord is portrayed in The Calling of Katie Makanya as finding it problematic as a white woman to write a black woman’s story. Using the theories of Judith Butler, the analyses show that the context of the narrative’s emergence creates a complex framing of The Calling of Katie Makanya. This paper aims to highlight and examine instances where the effects of this complex framing rise to the surface of the text and create tensions in the narrative.

  • 44.
    Siméus, Jenny
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö.
    Complex Collaborations: Elsa Joubert’s The Long Journey of Poppie Nongena and Zoë Wicomb’s David’s Story2014In: Ariel: A Review of International English Literature, ISSN 0004-1327, Vol. 45, no 1-2, p. 221-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay examines how South African author Zoë Wicomb’s novel David’s Story (2001) critiques collaborative life writing. More specifically, it argues that the faltering collaboration between the protagonists David and the unnamed amanuensis in David’s Story serves as an illuminating critique of past collaborative works such as Elsa Joubert’s The Long Journey of Poppie Nongena (1980) by shifting the focus from the end product to the collaborative writing process that precedes it. The analyses in this essay reveal that the fallibility of language demonstrated in Wicomb’s novel serves as a reminder of the impossibility of the narrative project that the amanuensis and David have set out to work on. Moreover, this essay argues that Wicomb’s novel highlights what can be unequal power relations between an amanuensis and an autobiographical subject in a collaborative writing process.

  • 45.
    Siméus, Jenny
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö.
    Creating a Collaborative Community: Problems and Possibilities of Collaborative Autobiographical Writing in Jonathan Morgan's Finding Mr Madini2015In: Global Community?: Transnational and Transdisciplinary Exchanges / [ed] Henrik Eneroth, Douglas Brommesson, London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015, 1, p. 79-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Siméus, Jenny
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö.
    Narrating an Other and Each Other: Collaborative Constructions of Selfhood in There Was This Goat : Investigating the Truth Commission Testimony of Notrose Nobomvu Konile2018In: Life Writing, ISSN 1448-4528, E-ISSN 1751-2964, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 243-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to examine the textual constructions of selfhood in the South African narrative There Was This Goat: Investigating the Truth Commission Testimony of Notrose Nobomvu Konile (2009), co-authored by Antjie Krog, Nosisi Mpolweni and Kopano Ratele. There Was This Goat is dedicated to understanding Mrs Konile and her Truth and Reconciliation Commission testimony given in Xhosa, a testimony which many found incomprehensible. I trace and read Mrs Konile through the lens of Judith Butler and her ideas about self-narration and through Sarah Nuttall’s concept of entanglement. These two approaches underline the social aspects of both self-narration and identity formation through narration, and therefore assist me in approaching the authors as simultaneous characters in the text, recipients of Mrs Konile’s narrative, and creators of the textually represented Mrs Konile. The authors’ dual function as writers of and characters within the narrative is an important factor which has been only briefly considered in much of the previous scholarly research on this multivoiced life writing text. This article argues that Mrs Konile is disempowered by the structure of the narrative, which positions her as a passive object of study rather than an active subject of her own life narrative.

  • 47.
    Sjödin, Anna-Pya
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Understanding atman in Praśastapadabhasya with the reading of Vyomaśiva and Śridhara2016In: Journal of Hindu Studies, ISSN 1756-4255, E-ISSN 1756-4263, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 84-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analysis in this article is driven by a question concerning how self (atman) has been thought by Vaiśesika philosophers within the Vaiśesikasutra commentarial tradition. That is to say, how the category of self is expressed, and how the thinking on self is structured, in Praśastapadabhasya, and in its commentaries Nyayakandala and Vyomavata. The idea of self is discussed within three main aspects: first, cognition and action; secondly, incentive and action; and lastly, merit, demerit, and liberation. The article shows how these interrelated factors are used in order to delineate a self that could be understood in two ways, bodily and disembodied. It is furthermore shown how the bodily self is in focus for these philosophers insofar as it is the key to the possibility of liberation (moksa) through the categories of acting and knowing.

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