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  • 1.
    Aaboud, M.
    et al.
    Faculté des Sciences, Université Mohamed Premier and LPTPM, Oujda, Morocco.
    Aad, G.
    CPPM, Aix-Marseille Université and CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille, France.
    Abbott, B.
    Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, United States of America.
    Abdallah, J.
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, United States of America.
    Augsten, K.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Caforio, D.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Gallus, P.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Guenther, J.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Hubaček, Z.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Myska, M.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Pospisil, S.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Seifert, F.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Simak, V.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Slavicek, Tomas
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Smolek, K.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Solar, M.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Sopczak, A.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Sopko, V.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Suk, M.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Tureček, D.
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced by vector-boson fusion and decaying to bottom quarks in root s=8TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector2016In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A search with the ATLAS detector is presented for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced by vector-boson fusion and decaying to a pair of bottom quarks, using 20.2 fb−1 of LHC proton-proton collision data at s=8" role="presentation" style="box-sizing: border-box; display: inline-table; line-height: normal; letter-spacing: normal; word-spacing: normal; word-wrap: normal; white-space: nowrap; float: none; direction: ltr; max-width: none; max-height: none; min-width: 0px; min-height: 0px; border: 0px; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; position: relative;">s√=8s=8 TeV. The signal is searched for as a resonance in the invariant mass distribution of a pair of jets containing b-hadrons in vector-boson-fusion candidate events. The yield is measured to be −0.8 ± 2.3 times the Standard Model cross-section for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV. The upper limit on the cross-section times the branching ratio is found to be 4.4 times the Standard Model cross-section at the 95% confidence level, consistent with the expected limit value of 5.4 (5.7) in the background-only (Standard Model production) hypothesis.

  • 2.
    Alecrim, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Hakan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Photoconductivity of bulk and liquid processed MoS22014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Alecrim, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Exfoliated Layered Materials for Digital Fabrication2015In: NIP & Digital Fabrication Conference, 2015, Vol. 1, p. 192-194Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduced an exfoliation method of MoS2 in a 3% solution of sodium dodecyl surfactant at high concentration (i.e. 2 g/L). The bulk MoS2 was thinned by mechanical exfoliation between sand papers and the resulting powder was used to prepare dispersions by liquid exfoliation through probe sonication. The resulting dispersion consisted of very thin MoS2 nanosheets in surfactant solution with average lateral size around 126 nm. This may be interesting for applications in inkjet printed electronics.

  • 4.
    Ali, S.
    et al.
    Univ Stockholm, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Orban, I.
    Univ Stockholm, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mahmood, S.
    Univ Stockholm, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Altun, Z.
    Marmara Univ, Dept Phys, TR-81040 Istanbul, Turkey.
    Glans, Peter
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Schuch, R.
    Univ Stockholm, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    ELECTRON-ION RECOMBINATION RATE COEFFICIENTS FOR C II FORMING C I2012In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 753, no 2, p. Art. no. 132-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have determined absolute dielectronic recombination rate coefficients for C II, using the CRYRING heavy-ions storage ring. The resonances due to 2s-2p (Delta n= 0) core excitations are detected in the center-of-mass energy range of 0-15 eV. The experimental results are compared with intermediate coupling AUTOSTRUCTURE calculations. Plasma rate coefficients are obtained from the DR spectrum by convoluting it with a Maxwell-Boltzmann energy distribution for temperatures in the range of 10(3)-10(6) K. The derived temperature-dependent plasma recombination rate coefficients are presented graphically and parameterized by using a fit formula for convenient use in plasma modeling codes. The experimental rate coefficients are also compared with the theoretical data available in literature. In the temperature range of 10(3)-2 x 10(4) K, our experimental results show that previous calculations severely underestimate the plasma rate coefficients and also our AUTOSTRUCTURE calculation does not reproduce the experimental plasma rate coefficients well. Above 2x10(4) K, the agreement between the experimental and theoretical rate coefficients is much better, and the deviations are smaller than the estimated uncertainties.

  • 5.
    Almeida, Tiago P.
    et al.
    PIPG Bioenergia-UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil.
    Miyazaki, Celina M
    Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias para a Sustentabilidade- UFSCa, Sorocaba, SP, Brazil.
    Volpati, Diogo
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Silva, Tatiana A.
    University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP, Brazil .
    Braunger, Maria Luisa
    University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP, Brazil .
    Barros, Anerise
    University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP, Brazil .
    Hollmann, Frank
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Riul Jr, Antonio
    PIPG Bioenergia-UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil.
    Ultra-Thin Films of Reduced Graphene Oxide (RGO) Nanoplatelets Functionalized with Different Organic Materials2016In: Journal of Bioprocessing & Biotechniques, ISSN 2155-9821, Vol. 6, no 3, article id 1000272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims the functionalization of reduced graphene oxide nanoplatelets with chitosan (G-chitosan) and also with poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (GPSS), thus forming stable, dispersed aqueous solutions. G-chitosan and GPSS solutions allowed the layer-by-layer (LbL) film formation with glucose oxidase (GOx), establishing multilayered nanostructures with elevated control in thickness and morphology. The graphene nanoplatelets were characterized by UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopies, resulting in good adherence and linear deposition of the graphene nanoplatelets with GOx in the LbL structures.Cyclic voltammetry shows an enlargement in the current intensity with increasing number of deposited LbL layers, possibly owing to the formation of conducting paths by the graphene nanoplatelets in the tailored multilayer nanomaterial formed

  • 6.
    Anastasopoulos, M.
    et al.
    European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Bebb, R.
    European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Berry, K.
    Instrument and Source Division, Spallation Neutron Source, United States.
    Birch, J.
    Linköping University.
    Bryś, T.
    European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Buffet, J. -C
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Clergeau, J. -F
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Deen, P. P.
    European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Ehlers, G.
    Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Spallation Neutron Source, United States.
    Van Esch, P.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Everett, S. M.
    Instrument and Source Division, Spallation Neutron Source, United States.
    Guerard, B.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Hall-Wilton, Richard
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design. European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Herwig, K.
    Instrument and Source Division, Spallation Neutron Source, United States.
    Hultman, L.
    Linköping University.
    Höglund, C.
    Linköping University; European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Iruretagoiena, I.
    European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Issa, F.
    European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Jensen, J.
    Linköping University.
    Khaplanov, A.
    European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Kirstein, O.
    European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Higuera, I. L.
    European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Piscitelli, F.
    European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Robinson, L.
    European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Schmidt, S.
    European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Stefanescu, I.
    European Spallation Source, Lund.
    Multi-Grid detector for neutron spectroscopy: Results obtained on time-of-flight spectrometer CNCS2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, no 4, article id P04030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Multi-Grid detector technology has evolved from the proof-of-principle and characterisation stages. Here we report on the performance of the Multi-Grid detector, the MG.CNCS prototype, which has been installed and tested at the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer, CNCS at SNS. This has allowed a side-by-side comparison to the performance of 3He detectors on an operational instrument. The demonstrator has an active area of 0.2 m2. It is specifically tailored to the specifications of CNCS. The detector was installed in June 2016 and has operated since then, collecting neutron scattering data in parallel to the He-3 detectors of CNCS. In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of this data, in particular on instrument energy resolution, rate capability, background and relative efficiency. Stability, gamma-ray and fast neutron sensitivity have also been investigated. The effect of scattering in the detector components has been measured and provides input to comparison for Monte Carlo simulations. All data is presented in comparison to that measured by the 3He detectors simultaneously, showing that all features recorded by one detector are also recorded by the other. The energy resolution matches closely. We find that the Multi-Grid is able to match the data collected by 3He, and see an indication of a considerable advantage in the count rate capability. Based on these results, we are confident that the Multi-Grid detector will be capable of producing high quality scientific data on chopper spectrometers utilising the unprecedented neutron flux of the ESS.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Manuilskiy, Anatoliy
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Bäckström, Joakim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Contacting paper-based supercapacitors to printed electronics on paper substrates2012In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 476-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hybrid printed electronics, in which printed structures and silicon-based components co-exist will likely be among the first commercial solutions. In this case the paper substrate acts much in the same way as circuit boards, containing conductive tracks and acting as a carrier for the electrical components. It is important to consider the contacting of the components to be able to produce low resistance electrical contacts to the conductive tracks. Supercapacitors are able to deliver a large amount of current in a short time and are a good option for short term energy storage and if the printed product is to be used only one, or a few times, it can be the only power source needed. When manufacturing printed electronics, the overall resistance of the printed tracks as well as the contact resistance of the mounted components will add up to the total resistance of the system. A high resistance will cause a voltage drop from the power source to the component. This will waste power that goes to Joule heating and also the voltage and current available to components may be too low to drive them. If the intention is to use a power supply such as batteries or solar cells this becomes a limitation. In this article have been tested several conductive adhesives used to contact paper based supercapacitors to ink jet printed silver tracks on paper. The best adhesive gives about 0.3 Ω per contact, a factor 17 better compared to the worst which gave 5 Ω. The peak power that is possible to take out from a printed system with a flexible battery and super capacitors is about 10 times higher than compared with the same system with only the battery.

  • 8.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Low-Cost, Environmentally Friendly Electric Double-Layer Capacitors: Concept, Materials and Production2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s society is currently performing an exit from fossilfuel energy sources. The change to sustainable alternativesrequires inexpensive and environmentally friendly energy storagedevices. However, most current devices contain expensive,rare or toxic materials. These materials must be replaced bylow-cost, abundant, nontoxic components.In this thesis, I suggest the production of paper-based electricdouble-layer capacitors (EDLCs) to meet the demand oflow-cost energy storage devices that provide high power density.To fulfill the requirements of sustainable and environmentallyfriendly devices, production of EDLCs that consist of paper,graphite and saltwater is proposed. Paper can be used as aseparator between the electrodes and as a substrate for theelectrodes. Graphite is suited for use as an active material in theelectrodes, and saltwater can be employed as an electrolyte.Westudied and developed different methods for the productionof nanographite and graphene from graphite. Composites containingthese materials and similar advanced carbon materialshave been tested as electrode materials in EDLCs. I suggest theuse of cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) or microfibrillated cellulose(MFC) as a binder in the electrodes. In addition to improvedmechanical stability, the nanocellulose improved the stabilityof graphite dispersions and the electrical performance of theelectrodes. The influence of the cellulose quality on the electricalproperties of the electrodes and EDLCs was investigated.The results showed that the finest nanocellulose quality is notthe best choice for EDLC electrodes; MFC is recommended forthis application instead. The results also demonstrated thatthe capacitance of EDLCs can be increased if the electrodemasses are adjusted according to the size of the electrolyte ions.Moreover, we investigated the issue of high contact resistancesat the interface between porous carbon electrodes and metalcurrent collectors. To reduce the contact resistance, graphitefoil can be used as a current collector instead of metal foils.Using the suggested low-cost materials, production methodsand conceptual improvements, it is possible to reduce the material costs by more than 90% in comparison with commercialunits. This confirms that paper-based EDLCs are apromising alternative to conventional EDLCs. Our findings andadditional research can be expected to substantially supportthe design and commercialization of sustainable EDLCs andother green energy technologies.

  • 9.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Paper-based supercapacitors2013In: Young Researchers’ Abstracts 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supercapacitors are high performance energy storage devices that offer many advantages like high power densities, fast charge/discharge times and long lifetimes. Due to high purchase prices the use of supercapacitors is limited. Thus we introduced the concept of low cost paper-based supercapacitors. Paper serves as a carrier for the active electrode material, as ion conductor and as separator in the supercapacitor. Different carbon materials, like graphene, graphite and activated carbon are used as active material for the electrodes. We are developing a process to produce large quantities of inexpensive graphene by mechanical exfoliation of graphite. Both coated and filled electrode papers were prepared and tested in supercapacitors. Besides graphene we coated several graphene/graphite composites on paper. By adding small amounts of gold nanoparticles or nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) the supercapacitors performance can be improved to a great extent. Specific capacitances of up to 100 F/g for coated paper electrodes and sheet-resistances as low as 0.5 Ω/sq could be obtained. Another advantage of this concept is that papermaking technologies can be used to prepare conducting electrodes, thin separators and manufacture the device itself. The paper industry has the ability to facilitate a large scale production of inexpensive supercapacitors.

  • 10.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Paper-based Supercapacitors2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing market of mobile electronic devices, renewable off-grid energy sources and electric vehicles requires high-performance energy storage devices. Rechargeable batteries are usually the first choice due to their high energy density. However, supercapacitors have a higher power density and longer life-time compared to batteries. For some applications supercapacitors are more suitable than batteries. They can also be used to complement batteries in order to extend a battery's life-time. The use of supercapacitors is, however, still limited due to their high costs. Most commercially available supercapacitors contain expensive electrolytes and costly electrode materials.

    In this thesis I will present the concept of cost efficient, paper-based supercapacitors. The idea is to produce supercapacitors with low-cost, green materials and inexpensive production processes. We show that supercapacitor electrodes can be produced by coating graphite on paper. Roll-to-roll techniques known from the paper industry can be employed to facilitate an economic large-scale production. We investigated the influence of paper on the supercapacitor's performance and discussed its role as passive component. Furthermore, we used chemically reduced graphite oxide (CRGO) and a CRGO-gold nanoparticle composite to produce electrodes for supercapacitors. The highest specific capacitance was achieved with the CRGO-gold nanoparticle electrodes. However, materials produced by chemical synthesis and intercalation of nanoparticles are too costly for a large-scale production of inexpensive supercapacitor electrodes. Therefore, we introduced the idea of producing graphene and similar nano-sized materials in a high-pressure homogenizer. Layered materials like graphite can be exfoliated when subjected to high shear forces. In order to form mechanical stable electrodes, binders need to be added. Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) can be used as binder to improve the mechanical stability of the porous electrodes. Furthermore, NFC can be prepared in a high-pressure homogenizer and we aim to produce both NFC and graphene simultaneously to obtain a NFC-graphene composite. The addition of 10% NFC in ratio to the amount of graphite, increased the supercapacitor's capacitance, enhanced the dispersion stability of homogenized graphite and improved the mechanical stability of graphite electrodes in both dry and wet conditions. Scanning electron microscope images of the electrode's cross section revealed that NFC changed the internal structure of graphite electrodes depending on the type of graphite used. Thus, we discussed the influence of NFC and the electrode structure on the capacitance of supercapacitors.

  • 11.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Supercapacitors with graphene coated paper electrodes2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Andres, Britta
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Characterization of nanographite and graphene produced in a high-pressure homogenizer2014In: Graphene Week 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supercapacitor electrodes are often made of porous carbon materials such as activated carbon, but also graphene was frequently used as active electrode material. Graphene can be produced by mechanical exfoliation, chemical exfoliation, chemical vapor deposition or other elaborate methods. These techniques are relatively expensive and produce small quantities only. Recently we presented a method to produce nanographite and graphene by mechanical exfoliation of graphite in a high-pressure homogenizer. In our contribution “Large-scale production of graphene” by Nicklas Blomquist we suggest to optimize the geometry of the shear zone and increase the feeding pressure to obtain a higher yield.

    In this study we evaluated the influence of these process optimizations on the structural and electrical properties of the nanographite-graphene mixture. The produced dispersions were characterized in terms of particle size and shape by using a particle size analyzer, a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an atomic force microscope (AFM). In order to analyze the performance of the produced material as electrodes for supercapacitors, electrodes were produced by vacuum filtration. The electrodes were studied by sheet-resistance and capacitance measurements. Furthermore, the structure of the electrode surface and the cross section of the electrode were visualized by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

    Comparisons with previously produced nanographite-graphene dispersions showed an increase in yield of the exfoliated nanomaterials. The optimized shear zone increased the production of nanosized particles and flakes and enhanced the material quality.

  • 13.
    Andres, Britta
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Inexpensive production of graphene by mechanical treatment of graphite2014In: Graphene Study 2014, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Andres, Britta
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Cellulose-based binder systems for electrochemical electrodes2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Andres, Britta
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Electrode Mass Balancing as an Inexpensive and Simple Method to Increase the Capacitance of Electric Double-Layer Capacitors2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 9, p. 1-12, article id e0163146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Symmetric electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) have equal masses of the same active material in both electrodes. However, having equal electrode masses may prevent the EDLC to have the largest possible specific capacitance if the sizes of the hydrated anions and cations in the electrolyte differ because the electrodes and the electrolyte may not be completely utilized. Here we demonstrate how this issue can be resolved by mass balancing. If the electrode masses are adjusted according to the size of the ions, one can easily increase an EDLC's specific capacitance. To that end, we performed galvanostatic cycling to measure the capacitances of symmetric EDLCs with different electrode mass ratios using four aqueous electrolytes-Na2SO4, H2SO4, NaOH, and KOH (all with a concentration of 1 M)-and compared these to the theoretical optimal electrode mass ratio that we calculated using the sizes of the hydrated ions. Both the theoretical and experimental values revealed lower-than-1 optimal electrode ratios for all electrolytes except KOH. The largest increase in capacitance was obtained for EDLCs with NaOH as electrolyte. Specifically, we demonstrate an increase of the specific capacitance by 8.6% by adjusting the electrode mass ratio from 1 to 0.86. Our findings demonstrate that electrode mass balancing is a simple and inexpensive method to increase the capacitance of EDLCs. Furthermore, our results imply that one can reduce the amount of unused material in EDLCs and thus decrease their weight, volume and cost.

  • 16.
    Andres, Britta
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Enhanced electrical and mechanical properties of nanographite electrodes for supercapacitors by addition of nanobrillated cellulose2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graphene and other porous carbon materials are widely used as electrodes in supercapacitors. In order to form mechanically stable electrodes, binders can be added to the conducting electrode material. However, most binders degrade the electrical performance of the electrodes. Here we show that by using nanobrillated cellulose (NFC) as binder the electrical properties, such as sheet-resistance, were enhanced. NFC is a good ion conductor and improves the access of ions to the electrodes. Thus electrodes made of a mixture of nanographite and NFC achieved larger capacitances in supercapacitors than electrodes with nanographite only. The lowest sheet-resistance and the highest capacitance were measured at NFC contents of 10{15% in ratio to the total amount of active material. Furthermore, NFC formed a network that improved the mechanical stability of the electrodes signicantly. Beside the mechanical stability, NFC stabilized the aqueous nanographite dispersion that was used to prepare the electrodes. NFC avoids the restacking of the delaminated graphene akes by forming a ber network between the graphene layers.

  • 17.
    Andres, Britta
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Influence of Electrode Mass Ratio on Capacitance of Supercapacitors2015In: Abstract Book, ISEECap 2015, 2015, p. 132-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Ashraf, Shakeel
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Niskanen, Ilpo
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design. University of Oulu, Finland.
    Kanyathare, Boniphace
    Electronics and Telecommunications Department, Dar es salaam Institute of Technology, Tanzania.
    Vartiainen, Erik
    LUT School of Engineering Science, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Mattsson, Claes
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Heikkilä, Rauno
    Faculty of Technology, Structures and Construction Technology, University of Oulu, Finland.
    Thungström, Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Determination of complex refractive index of SU-8 by Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation method at the wavelength range 2.5 – 22.0 μm2019In: Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer, ISSN 0022-4073, E-ISSN 1879-1352, Vol. 224, p. 309-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate determination of the complex refractive index of SU-8 epoxy has significant for the wide variety of applications in optical sensor technology at IR range. The complex refractive index of SU-8 is determined by recording the transmission of light spectra for the wavelength range of 2.5 – 22.0 μm.  The data analysis is based on the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation method. The method has several merits, such as ease of operation, non-contact technique, measurement accuracy, and rapid measurement. The present method is not restricted to the case of SU-8 but it is also proposed to be applicable across a broad range of applications, such as assessment of the optical properties of paints and biomedical samples.

  • 19.
    Balliu, Enkeleda
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Engholm, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Nilsson, Hans-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    A compact, single-frequency, high-power, SBS-free, Yb-doped single-stage fiber amplifier2019In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering / [ed] W. Andrew Clarkson and Ramesh K. Shori, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2019, Vol. 10896, p. 6pp-, article id 1089618Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in compact, single-frequency fiber amplifier has increased within many scientific and industrial applications. The main challenge is the onset of nonlinear effects, which limit their power scaling. Here we demonstrate a compact, high-power, single-frequency, polarization-maintaining, continous-wave fiber amplifier using only one amplification stage. We developed the fiber amplifier using a master oscillator fiber amplifier architecture, where a low-noise, single-frequency, solid-state laser operating at 1064 nm was used as a seed source. We evaluated the amplifier's performance by using several state-of-the-art, small-core, Ytterbium (yb)-doped fibers, as well as an in-house-made, highly Yb-doped fiber. An output power of 82 W was achieved with no sign of stimulated Brillouin scattering. A good beam quality and a polarization extinction ratio (PER) of > 25 dB were achieved. The compact fiber amplifier can be a competitive alternative to multi stage designed fiber amplifiers.

  • 20.
    Balliu, Enkeleda
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Thontakudi, Anjali
    Monta Vista High School, Cupertino, CA USA.
    Knall, Jenny M.
    Stanford University, Stanford, CA USA.
    Digonnet, Michel J. F.
    Stanford University, Stanford, CA USA.
    Predictive comparison of anti-Stokes fluorescence cooling in oxide and non-oxide fiber hosts doped with Er3+, Pr3+, or Yb3+2019In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering: Photonic Heat Engines: Science and Applications, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2019, Vol. 10936, article id 109360JConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comprehensive study was performed to quantify anti-Stokes-fluorescence (ASF) cooling in fibers of various host compositions (telluride, fluorozirconates, fluorophosphates, phosphates, and chalcogenides) doped with Yb3+ or Er3+. Published expressions were used to calculate the maximum heat that can be extracted per unit length and time from a single-mode fiber in the limit of negligible absorptive loss, and the associated cooling efficiency. These expressions consider host- and ion-dependent parameters, namely the absorption and emission cross-section spectra, the radiative and nonradiative lifetimes, and the critical concentration for quenching. Using these expressions with published values for these parameters, the maximum extractable heat was calculated for a large-mode-area fiber (NA = 0.05) doped with either Yb3+ or Er3+ in a variety of hosts. The results show that for a given ion, the maximum heat that can be extracted depends strongly on the host due to the strong dependence of quenching on host composition. In contrast, the cooling efficiency (ratio of extracted heat to pump power absorbed) depends very weakly on the host. The cooling efficiency is also almost twice as high for Er3+ (average of 3.8%) than for Yb3+ (average of 2.2%) due to the larger gap between the pump and mean fluorescence energy in Er3+. Of the limited number of materials for which a full set of data was found in the literature, the highest extractable heat for Yb3+ is in phosphate (-51.5 mW/m), and for Er3+ is in chalcogenide (-10.3 mW/m). This work provides a simple methodology to evaluate the quantitative cooling performance of these and other rare-earth ions in any amorphous host, a procedure that should guide researchers in the selection of optimum materials for ASF cooling of fibers.

  • 21.
    Barbosa, Simone C.
    et al.
    Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, São Carlos, SP, Brazil.
    Nobre, Thatyane M.
    Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, São Carlos, SP, Brazil.
    Volpati, Diogo
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Ciancaglini, Pietro
    Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.
    Cilli, Eduardo M.
    Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP, Brazil.
    Lorenzon, Esteban N.
    Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Brazil.
    Oliveira Jr., Osvaldo N.
    Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, São Carlos, SP, Brazil.
    The Importance of Cyclic Structure for Labaditin on Its Antimicrobial Activity Against Staphylococcus aureus2016In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 148, p. 453-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antimicrobial resistance has reached alarming levels in many countries, thus leading to a search for new classes of antibiotics, such as antimicrobial peptides whose activity is exerted by interacting specifically with the microorganism membrane. In this study, we investigate the molecular-level mechanism of action for Labaditin (Lo), a 10-amino acid residue cyclic peptide from Jatropha multifida with known bactericidal activity againstStreptococcus mutans. We show that Lo is also effective against Staphylococcus aureus(S. aureus) but this does not apply to its linear analogue (L1). Using polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), we observed with that the secondary structure of Lo was preserved upon interacting with Langmuir monolayers from a phospholipid mixture mimicking S. aureus membrane, in contrast to L1. This structure preservation for the rigid, cyclic Lo is key for the self-assembly of peptide nanotubes that induce pore formation in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), according to permeability assays and dynamic light scattering measurements. In summary, the comparison between Labaditin (Lo) and its linear analogue L1 allowed us to infer that the bactericidal activity of Lo is more related to its interaction with the membrane. It does not require specific metabolic targets, which makes cyclic peptides promising for antibiotics without bacteria resistance.

  • 22.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Large-Scale Graphene Production for Environmentally Friendly and Low-Cost Energy Storage: Production, Coating, and Applications2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is great demand for energy-efficient, environmentally sustainable, and cost-effective electrical energy storage devices. One important aspect of this demand is the need for automotive electrification to achieve more energy-efficient transportation at a reasonable cost, thus supporting a fossil-fuel free society. Another important aspect is the requirement for energy storage in the growing field of renewable energy production from wind and solar sources, which generates an irregular supply of electricity due to weather conditions.Much of the research in this area has been conducted in the field of battery technology with impressive results, but the need for rapid storage devices such as supercapacitors is growing. Due to the excellent ability of supercapacitors to handle short peak power pulses with high efficiency along with their long lifetime and superior cyclability, their implementations range from small consumer electronics to electric vehicles and stationary grid applications. Supercapacitors also have the potential to complement batteries to improve pulse efficiency and lifetime of the system, however, the cost of supercapacitors is a significant issue for large-scale commercial use, leading to a demand for sustainable, low-cost materials and simplified manufacturing processes. An important way to address this need is to develop a cost-efficient and environment-friendly large-scale process to produce highly conductive nanographites, such as graphene and graphite nanoplatelets, along with methods to manufacture low-cost electrodes from large area coating.

    In this thesis, I present a novel process to mechanically exfoliate industrial quantities of nanographite from graphite in an aqueous environment with low energy consumption and at controlled shear conditions. The process is based on hydrodynamic tube-shearing and can produce both multilayer graphene and nanometer-thick and micrometer-wide flakes of nanographite. I also describe the production of highly conductive and robust carbon composites based on the addition of nanocellulose during production; these are suitable as electrodes in applications ranging from supercapacitors and batteries to printed electronics and solar cells.Furthermore I demonstrate a scalable route for roll-to-roll coating of the nanographite-nanocellulose electrode material and propose a novel aqueous, low-cost, and metal-free supercapacitor concept with graphite foil functioning as the current collector. The supercapacitors possessedmore than half the specific capacitance of commercial units but achieved a material cost reduction of more than 90 %, demonstrating anenvironment-friendly, low-cost alternative to conventional supercapacitors.

  • 23.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Large-Scale Nanographite Exfoliation for Low-Cost Metal-Free Supercapacitors2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Paper based Supercapacitors for vehicle KERS-application2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    High mobility has been a standard in the modern world for decades. This has resulted in high energy consumption, diminishing fossil energy reserves and rising levels of greenhouse gases.

    By recovering the energy lost in deceleration of vehicles the total energy consumption can be decreased and exhaust emissions reduced. This can be done with a kinetic energy recovery system (KERS) that converts kinetic energy to electric energy during deceleration, which then can be used for acceleration.

    KERS requires an electrical storage device with high power density, due to the high power levels generated at heavy braking. Batteries does not generally meet these requirements, especially in the cost-effective point of view, but different types of capacitors can be used to obtain a cheap and effective system. To get such an energy storage device small, lightweight and inexpensive while the technology is sustainable requires avoidance of rare metals and hazardous materials.

    In this master thesis energy and power levels for KERS has been modelled, based on standardized measurements techniques and small paper-based supercapacitors have been built and tested in order to model size, weight and price for a full-scale energy storage device to a KERS-application.

    The models showed that energy consumption in urban traffic could be reduced with 18% and with an electrode material for the energy storage device with a capacitance of about 1500 F/m2 a reasonable size and weight is obtained. To reach these values of capacitance in paper-based supercapacitors further testing is required on area and layer dependence and for different electrodes.

  • 25.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Paper based Supercapacitors for vehicle KERS-application2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    High mobility has been a standard in the modern world for decades. This has resulted in high energy consumption, diminishing fossil energy reserves and rising levels of greenhouse gases.

    By recovering the energy lost in deceleration of vehicles the total energy consumption can be decreased and exhaust emissions reduced. This can be done with a kinetic energy recovery system (KERS) that converts kinetic energy to electric energy during deceleration, which then can be used for acceleration.

    KERS requires an electrical storage device with high power density, due to the high power levels generated at heavy braking. Batteries does not generally meet these requirements, especially in the cost-effective point of view, but different types of capacitors can be used to obtain a cheap and effective system. To get such an energy storage device small, lightweight and inexpensive while the technology is sustainable requires avoidance of rare metals and hazardous materials.

    In this master thesis energy and power levels for KERS has been modelled, based on standardized measurements techniques and small paper-based supercapacitors have been built and tested in order to model size, weight and price for a full-scale energy storage device to a KERS-application.

    The models showed that energy consumption in urban traffic could be reduced with 18% and with an electrode material for the energy storage device with a capacitance of about 1500 F/m2 a reasonable size and weight is obtained. To reach these values of capacitance in paper-based supercapacitors further testing is required on area and layer dependence and for different electrodes. 

  • 26.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences. STT Emtec AB, Sundsvall.
    Wells, Thomas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Bäckström, Joakim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Metal-free supercapacitor with aqueous electrolyte and low-cost carbon materials2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 39836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) or supercapacitors (SCs) are fast energy storage devices with high pulse efficiency and superior cyclability, which makes them useful in various applications including electronics, vehicles and grids. Aqueous SCs are considered to be more environmentally friendly than those based on organic electrolytes. Because of the corrosive nature of the aqueous environment, however, expensive electrochemically stable materials are needed for the current collectors and electrodes in aqueous SCs. This results in high costs for a given energy-storage capacity. To address this, we developed a novel low-cost aqueous SC using graphite foil as the current collector and a mix of graphene, nanographite, simple water-purification carbons and nanocellulose as electrodes. The electrodes were coated directly onto the graphite foil by using casting frames and the SCs were assembled in a pouch cell design. With this approach, we achieved a material cost reduction of greater than 90% while maintaining approximately one-half of the specific capacitance of a commercial unit, thus demonstrating that the proposed SC can be an environmentally friendly, low-cost alternative to conventional SCs.

  • 27. Bäckström, Joakim
    et al.
    Budelmann, D.
    Rauer, R.
    Rübhausen, M.
    Rodríguez, H.
    Adrian, H.
    Optical properties of YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_7 - \delta$ and PrBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_7 - \delta$ films: High-energy correlations and metallicity2004In: Physical Review B Condensed Matter, ISSN 0163-1829, E-ISSN 1095-3795, Vol. 70, no 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the dielectric functions of a high-Tc superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-- (Y-123) and a nonsuperconducting PrBa2Cu3O7-- (Pr-123) thin film using spectral ellipsometry. We evaluate the data by means of thermal-difference and sum-rule analysis techniques. We find that a spectral-weight transfer into the bands between 4 and 5 eV takes place before Y-123 becomes superconducting. We identify an anomaly around 1 eV that can be explained by a sudden plasma-frequency drop of the order of an meV around Tc. The absence of any sudden effects in the dielectric properties of Pr-123 suggests that both observations are intimately related to the superconducting state. Our findings point out that high-energy degrees of freedom must be considered for the understanding of high-temperature superconductivity.

  • 28. Bäckström, Joakim
    et al.
    Rubhausen, M.
    Kall, M.
    Borjesson, L.
    Litvinchuk, A. P.
    Kakihana, M.
    Osada, M.
    Dabrowski, B.
    Raman scattering in YBa2Cu4O8 and PrBa2Cu4O8 - indications of pseudogap effects in non-superconducting PrBa2Cu4O82000In: Physica. C, Superconductivity, ISSN 0921-4534, E-ISSN 1873-2143, Vol. 341, p. 2251-2252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By analysis of the temperature evolution of Raman spectra, we connect an observed supression in low-energy electronic density of states to an anomalous sharpening of the Ba-phonon mode in superconducting YBa2Cu4O8 (Y-124) at around T=150 K. We link the supression of electronic excitations to an opening of a pseudogap. Similar effects observed for the Ba-phonon mode at roughly the same temperature in non-superconducting PrBa2Cu4O8 (Pr-124) suggests that a pseduogap opens up around 150 K also in this material.

  • 29.
    Cherkashyna, N.
    et al.
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, 221 00 Lund, Sweden .
    Kanaki, K.
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, 221 00 Lund, Sweden .
    Kittelmann, T.
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, 221 00 Lund, Sweden .
    Filges, U.
    Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland.
    Deen, P.
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, 221 00 Lund, Sweden .
    Herwig, K.
    Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, United States .
    Ehlers, G.
    Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, United States.
    Greene, G.
    Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, United States .
    Carpenter, J.
    Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, United States .
    Connatser, R.
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, 221 00 Lund, Sweden .
    Hall-Wilton, Richard
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design. European Spallation Source ESS AB, 221 00 Lund, Sweden .
    Bentley, P. M.
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, 221 00 Lund, Sweden .
    High energy particle background at neutron spallation sources and possible solutions2014In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 528, no 1, p. Art. no. 012013-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern spallation neutron sources are driven by proton beams ∼ GeV energies. Whereas low energy particle background shielding is well understood for reactors sources of neutrons (∼20 MeV), for high energies (100s MeV to multiple GeV) there is potential to improve shielding solutions and reduce instrument backgrounds significantly. We present initial measured data on high energy particle backgrounds, which illustrate the results of particle showers caused by high energy particles from spallation neutron sources. We use detailed physics models of different materials to identify new shielding solutions for such neutron sources, including laminated layers of multiple materials. In addition to the steel and concrete, which are used traditionally, we introduce some other options that are new to the neutron scattering community, among which there are copper alloys as used in hadronic calorimeters in high energy physics laboratories. These concepts have very attractive energy absorption characteristics, and simulations predict that the background suppression could be improved by one or two orders of magnitude. These solutions are expected to be great benefit to the European Spallation Source, where the majority of instruments are potentially affected by high energy backgrounds, as well as to existing spallation sources.

  • 30.
    Correa, J.
    et al.
    DESY (Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron), Hamburg, Germany; CFEL Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Wunderer, C. B.
    DESY (Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron), Hamburg, Germany; CFEL Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Marras, A.
    DESY (Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron), Hamburg, Germany; CFEL Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Okrent, F.
    DESY (Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron), Hamburg, Germany; CFEL Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Lange, S.
    DESY (Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron), Hamburg, Germany; CFEL Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Kuhn, M.
    DESY (Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron), Hamburg, Germany; CFEL Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Niemann, M.
    DESY (Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron), Hamburg, Germany; CFEL Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Gottlicher, P.
    DESY (Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron), Hamburg, Germany.
    Shevyakov, I.
    DESY (Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron), Hamburg, Germany.
    Zimmer, M.
    DESY (Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron), Hamburg, Germany.
    Krivan, F.
    DESY (Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron), Hamburg, Germany.
    Boitrelle, B.
    DESY (Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron), Hamburg, Germany; CFEL Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg, Germany; Synchrotron SOLEIL L'Orme des Merisiers, Gifsur- Yvette Cedex, France.
    Guerrini, N.
    RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) / STFC, OX, U.K.
    Marsh, B.
    RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) / STFC, OX, U.K.
    Nicholls, T.
    RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) / STFC, OX, U.K.
    Sedgwick, I.
    RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) / STFC, OX, U.K.
    Cautero, G.
    Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste, Italy.
    Giuressi, D.
    Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste, Italy.
    Menk, R. H.
    Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste, Italy.
    Pinaroli, G.
    Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste, Italy; Universita degli Studi di Udine, Udine, Italy.
    Stebel, L.
    Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste, Italy.
    Greer, A.
    DLS (Diamond Light Source), OX, U.K.
    Pedersen, U.
    DLS (Diamond Light Source), OX, U.K.
    Tartoni, N.
    DLS (Diamond Light Source), OX, U.K.
    Hyun, H. J.
    PAL (Pohang Accelerator Laboratory), Pohang, Korea.
    Kim, K. S.
    PAL (Pohang Accelerator Laboratory), Pohang, Korea.
    Rah, S. Y.
    PAL (Pohang Accelerator Laboratory), Pohang, Korea.
    Graafsma, Heinz
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design. DESY (Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron), Hamburg, Germany; CFEL Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    The PERCIVAL soft X-ray Detector2018In: 2018 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference, NSS/MIC 2018 - Proceedings, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2018, article id 8824727Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The PERCIVAL collaboration to develop a soft X-ray imager able to address the challenges of high brilliance light sources, such as new-generation synchrotrons and Free Electron Lasers, has reached one of its major milestones: a full 2-MegaPixel (P2M) system (uninterrupted 4 × 4 cm2 active area) has already seen its first light.Smaller prototypes of the device, a monolithic active pixel sensor based on CMOS technology, have already been fully characterised, and have demonstrated high frame rate, large dynamic range, and relatively high quantum efficiency.The PERCIVAL modular layout allows for clover-leaf like arrangement of up to four P2M systems. Moreover, it will be post-processed in order to achieve a high quantum efficiency in its primary energy range (250 eV to 1 keV).We will present the P2M system, its status and newest results, bring these in context with achieved prototype performance, and outline future steps. 

  • 31.
    Dijulio, D. D.
    et al.
    European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund; Division of Nuclear Physics, Lund University, Lund.
    Cherkashyna, N.
    European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund.
    Scherzinger, J.
    European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund; Division of Nuclear Physics, Lund University, Lund.
    Khaplanov, A.
    European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund.
    Pfeiffer, D.
    European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund; CERN, Geneva 23, Switzerland.
    Cooper-Jensen, C. P.
    European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Fissum, K. G.
    European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund; Division of Nuclear Physics, Lund University, Lund.
    Kanaki, K.
    European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund.
    Kirstein, O.
    European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund; University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia.
    Ehlers, G.
    Quantum Condensed Matter Division, ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, United States.
    Gallmeier, F. X.
    Instrument and Source Division, ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, United States.
    Hornbach, D. E.
    Instrument and Source Division, ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, United States.
    Iverson, E. B.
    Instrument and Source Division, ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, United States.
    Newby, R. J.
    Instrument and Source Division, ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, United States.
    Hall-Wilton, Richard J.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design. European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund.
    Bentley, P. M.
    European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Characterization of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source2016In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 746, no 1, article id 012033Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a survey of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA during routine daily operation. A broad range of detectors was used to characterize primarily the neutron and photon fields throughout the facility. These include a WENDI-2 extended range dosimeter, a thermoscientific NRD, an Arktis 4He detector, and a standard NaI photon detector. The information gathered from the detectors was used to map out the neutron dose rates throughout the facility and also the neutron dose rate and flux profiles of several different beamlines. The survey provides detailed information useful for developing future shielding concepts at spallation neutron sources, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently under construction in Lund, Sweden.

  • 32.
    Dreier, Till
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Krapohl, David
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Maneuski, Dzimitry
    School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland.
    Lawal, Najeem
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Schöwerling, Jan Oliver
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design. Osnabrück University of Applied Sciences, Osnabrück, Germany.
    O'Shea, Val
    School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland.
    Fröjdh, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    A USB 3.0 readout system for Timepix3 detectors with on-board processing capabilities2018In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 13, article id C11017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Timepix3 is a high-speed hybrid pixel detector consisting of a 256 x 256 pixel matrix with a maximum data rate of up to 5.12 Gbps (80 MHit/s). The ASIC is equipped with eight data channels that are data driven and zero suppressed making it suitable for particle tracking and spectral imaging.

    In this paper, we present a USB 3.0-based programmable readout system with online preprocessing capabilities. USB 3.0 is present on all modern computers and can, under real-world conditions, achieve around 320MB/s, which allows up to 40 MHit/s of raw pixel data. With on-line processing, the proposed readout system is capable of achieving higher transfer rate (approaching Timepix4) since only relevant information rather than raw data will be transmitted. The system is based on an Opal Kelly development board with a Spartan 6 FPGA providing a USB 3.0 interface between FPGA and PC via an FX3 chip. It connects to a CERN T imepix 3 chipboard with standard VHDCI connector via a custom designed mezzanine card. The firmware is structured into blocks such as detector interface, USB interface and system control and an interface for data pre-processing. On the PC side, a Qt/C++ multi-platformsoftware library is implemented to control the readout system, providing access to detector functions and handling high-speed USB 3.0 streaming of data from the detector.

    We demonstrate equalisation, calibration and data acquisition using a Cadmium Telluride sensor and optimise imaging data using simultaneous ToT (Time-over-Threshold) and ToA (Timeof- Arrival) information. The presented readout system is capable of other on-line processing such as analysis and classification of nuclear particles with current or larger FPGAs.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-12-11 15:36
  • 33.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Gradin, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Isaksson, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    On dissipative effects of paper web adhesion strength2011In: International Journal of Solids and Structures, ISSN 0020-7683, E-ISSN 1879-2146, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 24-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work is concerned with the adhesion strength between a paper web and a metal roll surface, which is a common situation in paper machines world-wide. It is shown that the classic expression relating the work of adhesion to the peeling angle and web tension is, in general, insufficient. An improved model is suggested to take into account the energy dissipation due to elastic-plastic deformation behavior of wet paper materials. To judge the model, an industrially relevant example of wet newsprint and a mild steel surface is studied. It is found that the agreement between theory and experimental observations is excellent. A key result is that elastic-plastic material behavior must always be included for wet paper materials in peeling processes.

  • 34.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Gradin, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Isaksson, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Gulliksson, Mårten
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    A Note on Wet Paper Web Adhesion Strength2012In: Journal of Testing and Evaluation, ISSN 0090-3973, E-ISSN 1945-7553, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 682-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work is concerned with the determination of the adhesion strength between a paper web and an adhesive surface. Edvardsson et al. [Edvardsson, S., Gradin, P., and Isaksson, P., "On Dissipative Effects of Paper Web Adhesion Strength," Int. J. Solids Struct., Vol. 48(1), 2011, pp. 24-30] suggested recently a model that takes into account the energy dissipation caused by elastic plastic deformation in the bent structure of a paper specimen. This model is further developed and investigated in the present work. A linear relation in plastic dissipation is discovered facilitating a novel analysis of the peeling tension and a more convenient determination of the proper adhesion strength. Industrial relevant examples are made with wet newsprint and kraft stock. A straightforward experimental procedure for determining the consistent adhesion strength is suggested. It is found that the agreement between the model and the experimental observations is good.

  • 35.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Gulliksson, Mårten
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Persson, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    The dynamical functional particle method: an approach for boundary value problems2012In: Journal of applied mechanics, ISSN 0021-8936, E-ISSN 1528-9036, Vol. 79, no 2, p. art. no. 021012-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work is concerned with new ideas of potential value for solving differential equations. First, a brief introduction to particle methods in mechanics is made by revisiting the vibrating string. The full case of nonlinear motion is studied and the corresponding nonlinear differential equations are derived. It is suggested that the particle origin of these equations is of more general interest than usually considered. A novel possibility to develop particle methods for solving differential equations in a direct way is investigated. The dynamical functional particle method (DFPM) is developed as a solution method for boundary value problems. DFPM is based on the concept of an interaction functional as a dynamical force field acting on quasi particles. The approach is not limited to linear equations. We exemplify by applying DFPM to several linear Schrödinger type of problems as well as a nonlinear case. It is seen that DFPM performs very well in comparison with some standard numerical libraries. In all cases, the convergence rates are exponential in time. © 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  • 36.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Karlsson, KG
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Spin axis variations of Mars: numerical limitations and model dependences2008In: Astronomical Journal, ISSN 0004-6256, E-ISSN 1538-3881, Vol. 135, no 4, p. 1151-1160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Celestial mechanical integrations for the whole solar system are carried out over four billion years before and after the present. The orbital solution of the solar system is stable during this whole time period. An instantaneous spin axis model including triaxiality is developed. In particular, spin axis precession, the Martian obliquity, solar torques, and the orbital eccentricity/inclination of Mars are studied. Model dependences from general relativity, solar oblateness, the Martian moons, solar mass loss, etc. are tested. Although the obliquity of Mars sometimes shows dramatic variations, some structures are robust and seem insensitive to the initial spin precession rate. A full integration is carried out during a total of 8000 Myr resulting in a Martian obliquity that is restricted between 10 and 60 degrees. The problems with numerical noise due to limited machine precision, integration step sizes, and the chaotic sensitivity of the solutions are studied and discussed. The limited machine precision (15-16 figures) alone is found to limit the duration of exact obliquity solutions to about 80 Myr.

  • 37.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Kristoffer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Science Education and Mathematics.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    corr3p_tr: A particle approach for the general three-body problem2016In: Computer Physics Communications, ISSN 0010-4655, E-ISSN 1879-2944, Vol. 200, p. 259-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents a convenient way to solve the non-relativistic Schrodinger equation numerically for a general three-particle system including full correlation and mass polarization. Both Coulombic and non-Coulombic interactions can be studied. The eigensolver is based on a second order dynamical system treatment (particle method). The Hamiltonian matrix never needs to be realized. The wavefunction evolves towards the steady state solution for which the Schrodinger equation is fulfilled. Subsequent Richardson extrapolations for several meshes are then made symbolically in matlab to obtain the continuum solution. The computer C code is tested under Linux 64 bit and both double and extended precision versions are provided. Test runs are exemplified and, when possible, compared with corresponding values in the literature. The computer code is small and self contained making it unusually simple to compile and run on any system. Both serial and parallel computer runs are straight forward. Program summary Program title: corr3p_tr Catalogue identifier: AEYR_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEYR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.ukilicence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 15025 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 156430 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: ANSI C. Computer: Linux 64bit PC. Operating system: Linux 64bit. RAM: 300 M bytes Classification: 2.7, 2.8, 2.9. Nature of problem: The Schrodinger equation for an arbitrary three -particle system is solved using finite differences and a fast particle method for the eigenvalue problem [20, 21, 23]. Solution method: A fast eigensolver is applied (see Appendix). This solver works for both symmetrical and nonsymmetrical matrices (which opens up for more accurate nonsymmetrical finite difference expressions to be applied at the boundaries). The three-particle Schrodinger equation is transformed in two major steps. First step is to introduce the function Q(r(1), (r)2, mu) = r(1)r(2)(1 - mu(2))phi(r(1), r(2), mu), where mu = cos (0(12)). The cusps (r(1) = r(2), mu = 1) are then transformed into boundary conditions. The derivatives of Qare then continuous in the whole computational space and thus the finite difference expressions are well defined. Three-particle coalescence (r(1) = r(2) = 0, mu) is treated in the same way. The second step is to replace Q(r(1), r(2), mu) with (2,root x(1)x(2))(-1)Q(x(1) x(2), mu). The space (x(1), x(2), mu) is much more appropriate for a finite difference approach since the square roots x(1) = root r(1), x(2) = root r(2) allow the boundaries to be much further out. The non-linearity of the x-grid also leads to a finer description near the nucleus and a coarser one further out thus resulting in a saving of grid points. Also, in contrast to the usual variable r(12), we have instead used mu which is an independent variable. This simplifies the mathematics and numerical treatments. Several different grids can naturally run completely independent of each other thus making parallel computations trivial. From several grid results the physical property of interest is extrapolated to continuum space. The extrapolations are made in a matlab m-script where all computations can be made symbolically so the loss of decimal figures are minimized during this process. The computer code, including correlation effects and mass polarization, is highly optimized and deals with either triangular or quadratic domains in (x(1), x(2)). Restrictions: The amount of CPU time may become unreasonable for states needing boundary conditions very far beyond the origin. Also if the condition number of the corresponding Hamiltonian matrix is very high, the number of iterations will grow. The use of double precision computations also puts a limit on the accuracy of extrapolated results to about 6-7 decimal figures. Unusual features: The numerical solver is based on a particle method presented in [20, 21, 23]. In the Appendix we provide specific details of dealing with eigenvalue problems. The program uses a 64 bit environment (Linux 64bit). Parallel runs can be made conveniently through a simple bash script. Additional comments: The discretized wavefunction is complete on every given grid. New interactions can therefore conveniently be added to the Hamiltonian without the need to seek for an appropriate basis set. Running time: Given a modern CPU such as Intel core i5 and that the outer boundary conditions of r(1) and r(2) is limited to, say 16 atomic units, the total CPU time of totally 10 grids of a serial run is typically limited to a few minutes. One can then expect about 6-7 correct figures in the extrapolated eigenvalue. A single grid of say h(1) = h(2) = h(3) = 1/16 converges in less than 1 s (with an error in the eigenvalue of about 1 percent). Parallel runs are possible and can further minimize CPU times for more demanding tasks. References: [20] S. Edvardsson, M. Gulliksson, and J. Persson.). Appl. Mech. ASME, 79 (2012) 021012. [21] S. Edvardsson, M. Neuman, P Edstrom, and H. Olin. Comp. Phys. Commun. 197 (2015) 169. [23] M. Neuman, S. Edvardsson, P. Edstrom, Opt. Lett. 40 (2015) 4325.

  • 38.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Neuman, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Gulliksson, Mårten
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Role of the particle method DFPM for solving linear equationsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Engholm, Magnus
    et al.
    Fiber Optic Valley AB.
    Jelger, P.
    KTH.
    Laurell, F.
    KTH.
    Norin, L.
    Acreo FiberLab.
    Improved photodarkening resistivity in ytterbium-doped fiber lasers by cerium codoping2009In: Optics Letters, ISSN 0146-9592, E-ISSN 1539-4794, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 1285-1287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that the photodarkening resistivity of ytterbium-doped fiber lasers can be greatly improved by cerium codoping. It is suggested that the coexistence of the redox couple Ce3+⁄Ce4+ in the glass provides means for trapping both hole- and electron-related color centers that are responsible for the induced optical losses in Yb-doped fiber lasers.

  • 40. Engholm, Magnus
    et al.
    Norin, Lars
    Acreo FiberLab AB.
    The role of charge transfer processes for the induced optical lossesin ytterbium doped fiber lasers2009In: The role of charge transfer processes for the induced optical lossesin ytterbium doped fiber lasers, 2009, Vol. 7195, no 71950TConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present how charge transfer processes influences the induced optical losses (photodarkening) in ytterbium doped fiber lasers. The location of the charge transfer absorption band is strongly composition dependent and is correlated to the valence stability of the ytterbium ion in the silicate glass matrix. An improved photodarkening performance can in general be observed for a charge-transfer band shifted to shorter wavelengths, although other routes are also possible to reduce photodarkening. Other parameters that affect the laser performance, such as absorption and emission cross section, must also be considered.

  • 41. Fogle, M
    et al.
    Badnell, N.R.
    Glans, Peter
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Loch, S.D.
    Madzunkov, S
    Abdel-Naby, Sh.A.
    Pindzola, M.S.
    Schuch, R
    Electron-ion recombination of Be-like C, N, and O2005In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 442, no 2, p. 757-766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The absolute total recombination reaction rate coefficients for Be-like C, N, and O have been measured using the CRYRING storage ring and compared with the results from distorted-wave theory. For the theory results, it is found that shifts to NIST energy values for the core excited energies of the recombining system are not sufficient to accurately match all of the resonance positions and heights at lower energies. These theory results represent the quality of most archived theory DR data. The accurate calculation of these low energy resonances still presents a significant challenge to theory. In addition, trielectronic recombination resonances, associated with the formation of triply excited states during recombination, have been observed in the total recombination reaction rate coefficient spectra of N3+ and O4+. Finally, we construct a dielectronic recombination Maxwellian rate coefficient from the experimental results for low n resonances, and from the theoretical results for high n resonances. In the case of O4+, the trielectronic recombination resonances have a strong influence on the low temperature Maxwellian rate coefficient. Our best hybrid Maxwellian rate coefficient is compared with archived distorted-wave theory data, and is found to be in reasonable agreement, even at the low temperatures.

  • 42.
    Forsberg, Sven
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Paper-based supercapacitors2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Liquid Exfoliation of Molybdenum Disulfide for Inkjet Printing2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the discovery of graphene, substantial effort has been put toward the synthesis and production of 2D materials. Developing scalable methods for the production of high-quality exfoliated nanosheets has proved a significant challenge. To date, the most promising scalable method for achieving these materials is through the liquid-based exfoliation (LBE) of nanosheetsin solvents. Thin films of nanosheets in dispersion can be modified with additives to produce 2D inks for printed electronics using inkjet printing. This is the most promising method for the deposition of such materials onto any substrate on an industrial production level. Although well-developed metallic and organic printed electronic inks exist on the market, there is still a need to improve or develop new inks based on semiconductor materials such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) that are stable, have good jetting conditions and deliver good printing quality.The inertness and mechanical properties of layered materials such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) make them ideally suited for printed electronics and solution processing. In addition,the high electron mobility of the layered semiconductors, make them a candidate to become a high-performance semiconductor material in printed electronics. Together, these features make MoS2 a simple and robust material with good semiconducting properties that is also suitable for solution coating and printing. It is also environmentally safe.The method described in this thesis could be easily employed to exfoliate many types of 2D materials in liquids. It consists of two exfoliation steps, one based on mechanical exfoliation of the bulk powder utilizing sand paper, and the other inthe liquid dispersion, using probe sonication to liquid-exfoliate the nanosheets. The dispersions, which were prepared in surfactant solution, were decanted, and the supernatant was collected and used for printing tests performed with a Dimatix inkjetprinter. The printing test shows that it is possible to use the MoS2 dispersion as a printed electronics inkjet ink and that optimization for specific printer and substrate combinations should be performed. There should also be advances in ink development, which would improve the drop formation and break-off at the inkjet printing nozzles, the ink jetting and, consequently, the printing quality.

  • 44.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Engholm, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Thungström, Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Photodetector of multilayer exfoliated MoS2 deposited on polyimide films2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We fabricated a photodetector based on multilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) by micromechanical cleavage of a molybdenite crystal using a polyimide film. We deposited 40 nm of gold by vacuum sputtering and copper tape was used for the contacts.  Without any surface treatment, we achieved high responsivity at different incident optical power. The calculated responsivity was 23 mA/W of incident optical power in the range between 400 and 800 nm. For the responsivity measurement it was estimated that MoS2 have a bandgap of 1.6 eV, which lies between monolayer and multilayer films. The thickness of the MoS2 thin film was determined by Raman spectroscopy evaluating the difference between the in plane  and out of plane  Raman modes. The measurement of IV curves indicated Ohmic contacts in respect to the Au regardless of the incident optical power. Our device fabrication was much simpler than previous reported devices and can be used to test the light absorption and luminescence capabilities of exfoliated MoS2.

  • 45.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Cellulose stabilizers for 2D materials inkjet inks2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, the most promising scalable method for achieving 2D materials dispersions is through liquidbasedexfoliation of nanosheets in solvents. We study the use of high throughput shear exfoliation insteadof sonication to exfoliate water dispersions of MoS2 using environmental friendly stabilizers based oncellulose. The resulted dispersion was then concentrated and inkjet printed on a flexible substrate. We usedethyl cellulose, cellulose nanofibers (CNF) and ultra-fine cellulose nanofibers (UF-CNF). The stability wasevaluated by measuring the differences in concentration over time. The particle size distribution (PSD) ofthe dispersed particles was evaluated using statistical methods applied to SEM images of the dispersions(See Fig 1 and 2). The zeta potential and the mechanisms of stabilization involved was evaluated (See Fig4). All three stabilizers appear to work very well for MoS2 nanosheets even though the mechanisms ofstabilization were different i.e. steric stabilization for MoS2-EC and electrostatic stabilization for MoS2-CNF and MoS2-UF-CNF dispersions. For the MoS2-EC dispersions we achieved a broader PSD (Fig. 1)and higher stability. Thin nanosheets was observed from the SEM image of MoS2-EC dispersions depositedonto cellulose filters by vacuum filtration (Fig. 5) which demonstrated that the exfoliation technique usedwas successful. The estimated concentration of the MoS2-EC dispersion after 8 days of sample preparationwas 0.24 mg/mL, 77% of the initial concentration (see Fig. 6) and it was relatively steady after 40 days ofsample preparation (0.22 mg/mL). To adjust the concentration and the viscosity of the MoS2-EC dispersion,we concentrated it using a rotary evaporator solvent exchange technique. For this we used terpineol andadjusted the viscosity using ethanol. This paper presents the results of an inkjet 2D material ink usingenvironmental friendly components different than previous 2D materials inks that used organic solvents orwater based dispersions containing surfactants.

  • 46.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Maslik, Jan
    Tomas Bata University.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Toivakka, Martti
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Koppolu, Rajesh
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Printability of functional inkjet inks onto commercial inkjet substrates and a taylor made pigmented coated paper2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Printed electronics are of increasing interest. The substrates used have primarily been plastics although the interest for cellulose-based substrates is increasing due to the environmental aspect as well as cost. The requirements of substrates for electronically active inks differs from graphical inks and therefore we have investigated a custom-made pigment based coated paper and compared it to commercial photo-papers and a coated PE film.

    Our goal with the study of different substrates was to select the most suitable substrate to print water based 2D materials inkjet inks for flexible electronics.

    The discovery of graphene, a layered material achieved from the exfoliation of graphite, has resulted in the study of other materials with similar properties to cover areas where graphene could not be used due to the absence of a bandgap in the material. For example in thin film transistors (TFT) a semiconductor layer is essential to enable turn on and off the device. This semiconductor layer can be achieved using various materials but particular interest have been dedicated to abundant and cheap 2D materials such as the transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2). To date, most of the dispersions based on TMDs use organic solvents or water solutions of surfactants. Previously we focus on the study of environmental friendly inks produced by liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) of MoS2 in water using cellulose stabilizers such as ethyl cellulose (EC), cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) and nanofibrilcellulose (NFC). We have study various aspects of the ink fabrication includi  ng pH range, the source of MoS2, nanosheets thickness, particle size distribution,  ink stabilizers, ink concentration, viscosity and surface tension. These inks have very low concentration requiring a number of printing passes to cover the substrate. Therefore the substrate selection is crucial as a large amount of solvent is to be absorb by the substrate. Our goal was to use such an ink to print electrodes of MoS2 into a paper substrate after substrate selection.

    Commercial photo papers, a commercial coated PE film and a tailor made multilayer pigment coated paper substrate were used for the substrate selection analysis.  We print the substrates using a DIMATIX inkjet printer with a 10 pL printing head using the distillated water waveform supplied by the printer manufacturer. The voltage used was 23V and 4 nozzles were used for the print outs. The inkjet ink used was the organic PEDOT:PSS. We printed lines ranging from 1 pixel to 20 pixels with 1, 2 and 3 printing passes. The printing quality was evaluated through measurements of the waviness of the printed lines measured after imaging the printed samples with a SEM microscope. The line width measurement was done using the software from the SEM.

    We also evaluated the structure of the coatings using SEM and topography measurements. The ink penetration through the substrates was evaluated using Raman Spectroscopy. For the pigmented coated sample we measured 4% of ink penetration through the substrate for the 1pxl printed line printed once onto the paper.  Cross-section SEM images of the printed lines were made to visualize the ink penetration into the substrate.

    Regarding the electrical conductivity of the printed samples, the differences in resistivity varying the width of the printed lines and the number of printed passes were evaluated. The resistivity of the printed electrodes was evaluated using the 2-points probe method. Before the resistivity measurements, the printed substrates were heated at 50°C and 100°C for 30 minutes in an oven.

    We choose the PEDOT:PSS ink because it is a low price ink compared to metal nanoparticles inks for printed electronics. The print outs had low resistivity at a few printing passes with no need for sintering at high temperatures. The MoS2 ink has a very high resistance at a few printing passes due to lower coverage of the substrate therefore for this ink these measurements were not possible to be made. The main pigment composition of the paper coatings of the substrates was evaluated using FT-IR and EDX, these data plus the coating structure evaluated by SEM was related to the print quality.

    The best in test papers were used to print MoS2 electrodes. After the printing tests, another step for the optimization of the MoS2 ink properties shall be carried out in future studies for better print quality. We also evaluated the surface energy of the substrates through contact angle measurements to match the surface tension of the PEDOT:PSS ink and later the MoS2 ink. Although the pigmented coated printing substrate did not show better results than the commercial photo papers and PE foil in terms of line quality, it shows the lowest resistivity and sufficient results for low cost recyclable electronics, which do not require high conductivity. Nevertheless, the substrate was very thin and it could even be used in magazines as traditional lightweight coated papers (LWC) are used but with the additional of a printed electronic feature.

  • 47.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Towards flexible and cheap printed electronics using inks of exfoliated 2D materials stabilized by cellulose2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Flexible and cheap electronics are needed for simple applications such as sensors and solar cells. To achieve this, thin functional materials should be deposited efficiently to flexible substrates such as paper. A promising method for the deposition of such materials is through inkjet printing that said a stable and printable dispersion is necessary. We achieved this through liquid-based exfoliation of 2D materials in water using shear exfoliation and cellulose stabilizers. The resulted dispersion was then concentrated and inkjet printed on a flexible substrate. We used ethyl cellulose, cellulose nanofibers (CNF) and ultra-fine cellulose nanofibers (UF-CNF). All three stabilizers appear to work very well for MoS2 nanosheets even though the mechanisms of stabilization were different among them. For the MoS2-EC dispersions we achieved a broader PSD and higher dispersion stability. Thin nanosheets were observed from the SEM image of MoS2-EC dispersions deposited onto cellulose filters. The estimated concentration of the MoS2-EC dispersion after 20 days of sample preparation was 0.20 mg/mL. This dispersion was further processed to adjust the concentration and viscosity.  Good coverage of the substrate was achieved after 50 printing passes. If the same technique is applied to other 2D materials such as graphene (conductor) and boro nitride (insulator), a transistor can be fabricated.

  • 48.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Towards stable 2D materials inkjet inks: a study of stabilizers and MoS2 grades2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Fröjdh, Christer
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Krapohl, David
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Reza, Salim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Fröjdh, Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Thungström, Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Norlin, Börje
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Spectral resolution in pixel detectors with single photon processing2013In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2013, p. Art. no. 88520O-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Pixel detectors based on photon counting or single photon processing readout are becoming popular for spectral X-ray imaging. The detector is based on deep submicron electronics with functions to determine the energy of each individual photon in every pixel. The system is virtually noiseless when it comes to the number of the detected photons. However noise and variations in system parameters affect the determination of the photon energy. Several factors affect the energy resolution in the system. In the readout electronics the most important factors are the threshold dispersion, the gain variation and the electronic noise. In the sensor contributions come from charge sharing, variations in the charge collection efficiency, leakage current and the statistical nature of the charge generation, as described by the Fano factor. The MEDIPIX technology offers a powerful tool for investigating these effects since energy spectra can be captured in each pixel. In addition the TIMEPIX chip, when operated in Time over Threshold mode, offers an opportunity to analyze individual photon interactions, thus addressing charge sharing and fluorescence. Effects of charge sharing and the properties of charge summing can be investigated using MEDIPIX3RX. Experiments are performed using both Si and CdTe detectors. In this paper we discuss the various contributions to the spectral noise and how they affect detector response. The statements are supported with experimental data from MEDIPIX-type detectors.

  • 50.
    Fröjdh, Christer
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Krapohl, David
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Thungström, Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Hard X-ray imaging and particle detection with TIMEPIX32016In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2016, Vol. 9968, article id UNSP 99680TConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CMOS pixel electronics open up for applications with single photon or particle processing. TIMEPIX3 is a readout chip in the MEDIPIX family with the ability to simultaneously determine energy and time of interaction in the pixel. The device is fully event driven, sending out data on each interaction at a maximum speed of about 40 Mhits/s. The concept allows for off-line processing to correct for charge sharing or to find the interaction point in multi pixel events. The timing resolution of 1.56 ns allows for three dimensional tracking of charged particles in a thick sensor due to the drift time for the charge in the sensor. The experiments in this presentation have been performed with silicon sensors bonded MEDIPIX family chips with special focus on TIMEPIX3. This presentation covers basic performance of the chip, spectral imaging with hard X-rays, detection and imaging with charged particles and neutrons. Cluster identification, centroiding and charge summing is extensively used to determine energy and position of the interaction. For neutron applications a converter layer was placed on top of the sensor.

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