miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Strategic Communication Found in Translation: Practices, Practitioners and Perceptions
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science. (DEMICOM)
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This dissertation seeks to explore how institutional, organizational and individual factors influence the development of strategic communication. The dissertationillustrates how new institutional theory can be applied to address the development of strategic communication as a process that is produced on different interrelated institutional levels. It also shows that multiple levels need to be addressed in order to develop a more comprehensive understanding of strategic communication. Further, it describes how the development of strategic communication is restricted and enabled by societal and organizational discourse in processes that are not always controlled by communication professionals. The dissertation also explores howpopular ideas or successful recipes for strategic communication are spread between organizations in the same field, but are adjusted or translated in order to fit organizational preconditions. The results also highlighthow professionalism is understood differently by communication practitioners depending on the organizational sector they work in and how the institutional embeddedness of communication practitioners influences the ways in which practitioners commit to their occupation.Moreover, it suggests that the inhabited and perceived moral taint that is associated with communication practitioners shapes the professional discourse and hampers the development of a shared occupational identity. Finally, it is suggestedthat knowledge about the development of strategic communication can be found in the translations and local adaptions of new ideas and practices. Insights about the institutionalization of strategic communication might not only be found in realized structures and routines, but in micro changes that happen as the result of local circumstances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sundsvall: Mittuniversitetet , 2016. , 197 p.
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 251
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28573Local ID: DEMICOMISBN: 978-91-88025-81-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-28573DiVA: diva2:954231
Public defence
2016-09-09, M102, Sundsvall, 14:00 (English)
Supervisors
Note

Vid tidpunkten för disputationen var följande delarbeten opublicerade: delarbete 2 under utgivning, delarbete 3 under utgivning, delarbete 4 inskickat, delarbete 5 accepterat.

At the time of the doctoral defence the following papers were unpublished: paper 2 in press, paper 3 in press, paper 4 submitted, paper 5 accepted.

Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2016-08-23Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Institutionalization of communication management in organizations – A theoretical framework
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Institutionalization of communication management in organizations – A theoretical framework
2011 (English)In: Corporate Communications. An International Journal, ISSN 1356-3289, E-ISSN 1758-6046, Vol. 17, no 2, 209-227 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – Development and expansion of the communication management function in organizations has lately been discussed in relation to the concept of institutionalization. Empirical evidence has illustrated that the role of communication executives and communication managers varies between organizations, and could also be subjected to change within an organization. In this paper, institutionalization of communication management is conceptualized as a process. A theoretical framework is developed, which integrates important factors that influence and regulate this process.

Design/Methodology – A literature review resulted in a number of factors potentially influencing the institutionalization process. These factors were attributed to three main theoretical areas and four different levels of analysis, using institutional theory as a guiding framework. The theoretical areas and analysis levels, were proposed to be mutually interdependent, and were compiled in a theoretical framework, illustrated in a model.

Findings – The theoretical framework includes three main areas: organizational structure, social capital, and perceptions of the profession; and four levels of analysis: the societal, the organizational field, the organizational and the individual levels.

Originality/Value – This paper contributes to the study of institutionalization of communication management in organizations by providing a theoretical framework, which can be used to further investigate the development of the communication function and the role of communication executives and communication managers in organizations. By conceptualizing institutionalization of communication management as a process – and exploring and defining important elements that influence and regulate this process, an important theoretical contribution to the field is made.

Keyword
Institutionalization, communication management, theoretical framework
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14723 (URN)10.1108/13563281211220247 (DOI)2-s2.0-84986043636 (Scopus ID)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Available from: 2011-11-30 Created: 2011-11-14 Last updated: 2017-07-04Bibliographically approved
2. Organizing and disorganizing strategic communication: Discursive institutional change in dynamics in two communication departments
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizing and disorganizing strategic communication: Discursive institutional change in dynamics in two communication departments
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Strategic Communication, ISSN 1553-118X, E-ISSN 1553-1198, Vol. 10, no 4, 332-351 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores the institutionalization of strategic communication as a dynamic interplay between macro- and mesolevel discourses. The change processes in the two cases of this study involved both a reorientation of the purpose of the communication function and a physical relocation of the professionals to a centralized department. In both organizations, the transformation toward a strategic management function failed and the communication professionals are now working in ways similar to those before the change was initiated. The analysis illustrates that the institutionalization of strategic communication is effected by organizational-level processes and mechanisms that are not always controlled by communication professionals. The institutionalization of strategic communication is bound by organizational discourses as well as by the actions of communication practitioners and general managers. The study also shows that macro- and mesolevel discourses influence the ways in which change initiatives are translated and strategic communication effected on an organizational level. Hence, institutionalization processes of strategic communication will comply with management trends but can change direction when these trends are challenged. Our results expose that new ideas or practices of strategic communication are translated discursively within organizations in processes of recontextualization, reinterpretation, and reframing. Consequently, new ideas and practices of strategic communication are adjusted to organizational discourses and organizational settings. The translation of a new idea or practice will therefore change the initial meaning of that same idea or practice. For that reason, institutionalization of strategic communication should not be reduced to a unidirectional process but conceptualized as a dynamic interplay between discourses on different levels that moves institutionalization in multiple directions.

National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28575 (URN)10.1080/1553118X.2016.1196692 (DOI)2-s2.0-84976418064 (Scopus ID)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2017-06-26Bibliographically approved
3. Organizational and occupational commitments of communication practitioners: sectorial comparisons of the role of the employing organization
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizational and occupational commitments of communication practitioners: sectorial comparisons of the role of the employing organization
(English)In: Journal of Communication Management, ISSN 1363-254X, E-ISSN 1478-0852Article in journal (Refereed) In press
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28576 (URN)
Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2016-08-22Bibliographically approved
4. Pulling together and tearing apart: The occupational branding of public relations and the management of tainted work
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pulling together and tearing apart: The occupational branding of public relations and the management of tainted work
2017 (English)In: Public Relations Inquiry, ISSN 2046-147X, E-ISSN 2046-1488, Vol. 6, no 1, 73-98 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article is a critical exploration of the professionalization of public relations as a struggle or contest over the meaning of work, and it engages with a question about the driving forces behind the long-standing professional project of public relations. The article will use the concepts of ‘dirty work’ and ‘occupational branding’ to address the relation between the role actually performed, normative ideals, and the image of the occupation. The article analyzes op-eds authored by public relations practitioners, scholars, and representatives from professional organizations in newspapers and trade media in order to explore the ways in which the meaning of public relations work is described, contested, and framed, and, consequently, the occupational brand of public relations is formed.

Keyword
Dirty work, identity, occupational branding, professionalization, public relations practitioners
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28577 (URN)10.1177/2046147X16682986 (DOI)2-s2.0-85011628835 (Scopus ID)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2017-06-26Bibliographically approved
5. Where you lead we will follow: A longitudinal study of strategic political communication and inter-party relations in election campaigning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Where you lead we will follow: A longitudinal study of strategic political communication and inter-party relations in election campaigning
2016 (English)In: Journal of Public Affairs, ISSN 1472-3891, E-ISSN 1479-1854Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The ways in which election campaigns are planned, organized, and conducted have changed considerably during recent decades, and political parties constantly employ new ideas and practices in order to communicate as strategically and effectively as possible. The concept of strategic political communication refers to an organization's purposeful management of information and communication to achieve certain political goals. In this article, we focus on the role of the individual political party in developing election campaigning. The empirical material covers the 2002, 2006, and 2010 Swedish national election campaigns and illustrates how political parties lead and follow each other in the development of strategic political communication. By exploring party agency, this article contributes to the understanding of how ideas and practices of strategic political communication emerge and develop over time in election campaigning.

Keyword
election campaigns, in-depth interviews, political party strategists, qualitative method, strategic political communication
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28578 (URN)10.1002/pa.1625 (DOI)
Note

First published: 13 September 2016

Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2016-10-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

Christina Grandien(303 kB)256 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 303 kBChecksum SHA-512
b8832bb771276a1c098dd89a8c1a186f683cfa708d1d0a69a9e1097454ef7469969503a903dba5c9b7c22f2cace9314b4674b85f653c652b3aeb9b94e0e78d64
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Grandien, Christina
By organisation
Department of Media and Communication Science
Media and Communications

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 256 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Total: 713 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf