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Teacher-Student Interaction in Contemporary Science Classrooms: Is Participation Still a Question of Gender?
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Science Education and Mathematics.
DPU, Aarhus University, Tuborgvej, København, Denmark .
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Science Education and Mathematics.
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 38, no 10, 1655-1672 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We show that boys still have a greater access to the space for interaction in science classrooms, which is unexpected since in Sweden today girls perform better in these subjects than boys. Results from video-recorded verbal communication, referred to here as interaction, show that the distribution of teacher–student interaction in the final year of lower secondary school follows the same patterns as in the 1980s. The interaction space for all kinds of talk continues to be distributed according to the two-thirds rule for communication in science classrooms as described by previous research. We also show that the overall interaction space in science classrooms has increased for both boys and girls when talk about science alone is considered. Another finding which follows old patterns is that male teachers still address boys more often than girls. This holds true both for general talk and for talk about science. If a more even distribution of teacher–student interaction is desirable, these results once again need to be considered. More research needs to be undertaken before the association between girls’ attitudes and interest in science in terms of future career choice and the opportunity to participate in teacher–student interaction is more clearly understood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 38, no 10, 1655-1672 p.
Keyword [en]
Teacher-student interaction, science education, gender, two-thirds rule
National Category
Educational Sciences Didactics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-28522DOI: 10.1080/09500693.2016.1213457ISI: 000380809200006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84980019039OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-28522DiVA: diva2:952165
Available from: 2016-08-11 Created: 2016-08-11 Last updated: 2017-04-19Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Att kommunicera skolans naturvetenskap: ett genusperspektiv på elevers deltagande i gemensam och enskild kommunikation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att kommunicera skolans naturvetenskap: ett genusperspektiv på elevers deltagande i gemensam och enskild kommunikation
2017 (Swedish)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Both individual and whole class communication of students are described in this thesis, which is based on a clear gender perspective. Two articles describe the participation of boys and girls in communication with the whole class, the empirical data collected consisting of videotaped lessons. The extent to which boys and girls participate in the communication is reported in the first study, and in the second the extent to which boys and girls respond to the teacher's closed or open questions about science is presented. The third study reports boys' and girls' individual communication when responding to written science questions. The summary chapter ties the results together from the perspective of Positioning Theory, making the thesis a result of Mixed Methods Research.

Results show that boys participate in whole class communication more often than girls, with approximately the same level of dominance as shown in research from the early 80s. Boys also answer more questions than girls, the differences becoming apparent when teachers ask closed questions that can be answered in one or two words. In isolation, girls answer written questions to the same extent as boys, but give longer responses containing a more developed scientific language.

Results showing that boys position themselves as knowledgeable more often than girls when teachers ask closed questions, are explained from the perspective of Positioning Theory. Girls more often position themselves as knowledgeable when teachers ask open questions that require reflection. In test situations, with time for reflection, the boys and girls position themselves as knowledgeable students to the same extent.

Teachers need to be aware of the positioning attempts created by teaching, and consequently take into account that different approaches in teaching provide boys and girls with different access to the communication space.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University, 2017. 98 p.
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 260
Keyword
Naturvetenskaplig kommunikation, positionering, genus, Mixed Methods Research
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-30611 (URN)978-91-88527-12-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-06-02, E409, Sundsvall, 10:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

Vid tidpunkten för disputationen var följande delarbete opublicerat: delarbete 3 accepterat.

At the time of the doctoral defence the following paper was unpublished: paper 3 accepted.

Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2017-04-19Bibliographically approved

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Eliasson, NinaKarlsson, Karl Göran
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