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Ectomycorrhizal exudates and pre-exposure to elevated CO2 affects soil bacterial growth and community structure
Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Uppsala BioCtr, Dept Forest Mycol & Plant Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden.
Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Uppsala BioCtr, Dept Forest Mycol & Plant Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences. Umeå Univ, Dept Chem, SE-90187 Umeå, Sweden.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3646-294X
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2016 (English)In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 20, 211-224 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Text
Abstract [en]

Ectomycorrhizal fungi produce low molecular weight organic compounds, supporting diverse microbial communities. To link mycorrhizal root exudation directly to bacterial responses, we used Scots pine exudates with (Suillus variegatus and Piloderma fallax) and without mycorrhiza as substrata for forest soil bacteria. Bacterial growth and vitality was monitored, and community composition determined using TRFLP, cloning and sequencing. We investigated if the amount of organic acids in exudates explained bacterial growth, and whether bacterial communities were influenced by pre-exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2. We demonstrated functional differences in bacterial growth rates related to CO2. There was a shift in the bacterial community (e.g. Burkholderia sp. and gamma-proteobacteria) toward organisms better able to rapidly utilize exudates when pine microcosms were pre-exposed to elevated CO2. Soil bacteria from all treatments tended to grow more abundantly and rapidly in exudates from Pilo derma -colonized seedlings, suggesting that the organic acids and/or unidentified compounds present supported greater growth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 20, 211-224 p.
Keyword [en]
Exudation, Organic acids, Mycorrhiza, Burkholderia, Suillus, Piloderma, Soil microbes, Nonmycorrhizal, Soil microbiome
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27813DOI: 10.1016/j.funeco.2016.01.003ISI: 000373539100026Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84959931329OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-27813DiVA: diva2:934296
Available from: 2016-06-08 Created: 2016-06-07 Last updated: 2016-12-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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