miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Male and female physical intimate partner violence and socio-economic position: a cross-sectional international multicentre study in Europe
Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, Kingston University, London, United Kingdom.
Department of Sociology, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece.
University of Emden, Emden, Germany.
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Journal of Public Health, ISSN 0943-1853, E-ISSN 1613-2238, Vol. 139, 44-52 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

This work explores the association between socio-economic position (SEP) and intimate partner violence (IPV) considering the perspectives of men and women as victims, perpetrators and as both (bidirectional).

Study design

Cross-sectional international multicentre study.

Methods

A sample of 3496 men and women, (aged 18–64 years), randomly selected from the general population of residents from six European cities was assessed: Athens; Budapest; London; Östersund; Porto; and Stuttgart. Their education (primary, secondary and university), occupation (upper white collar, lower white collar and blue collar) and unemployment duration (never, ≤12 months and >12 months) were considered as SEP indicators and physical IPV was measured with the Revised Conflict Tactics Scales.

Results

Past year physical IPV was declared by 17.7% of women (3.5% victims, 4.2% perpetrators and 10.0% bidirectional) and 19.8% of men (4.1% victims, 3.8% perpetrators and 11.9% bidirectional). Low educational level (primary vs university) was associated with female victimisation (adjusted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 3.2; 1.3–8.0) and with female bidirectional IPV (4.1, 2.4–7.1). Blue collar occupation (vs upper white) was associated with female victimisation (2.1, 1.1–4.0), female perpetration (3.0, 1.3–6.8) and female bidirectional IPV (4.0, 2.3–7.0). Unemployment duration was associated with male perpetration (>12 months of unemployment vs never unemployed: 3.8; 1.7–8.7) and with bidirectional IPV in both sex (women: 1.8, 1.2–2.7; men: 1.7, 1.0–2.8).

Conclusions

In these European centres, physical IPV was associated with a disadvantaged SEP. A consistent socio-economic gradient was observed in female bidirectional involvement, but victims or perpetrators-only presented gender specificities according to levels of education, occupation differentiation and unemployment duration potentially useful for designing interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UK: Elsevier, 2016. Vol. 139, 44-52 p.
Keyword [en]
Violence, Gender, Social inequalities
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-27763DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2016.05.001ISI: 000386189500007PubMedID: 27262180Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84973931689OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-27763DiVA: diva2:930653
Available from: 2016-05-24 Created: 2016-05-24 Last updated: 2016-12-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Soares, Joaquim J.F.Sundin, Örjan
By organisation
Department of Health SciencesDepartment of Psychology
In the same journal
Journal of Public Health
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 93 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf