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PERFORMANCE AND TRAINING IN CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3814-6246
2015 (English)In: ABSTRACT BOOK for the 20th Annual ECSS Congress, 2015Conference paper, Abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

During the past decades extensive research on the extraordinary physical capacities and unique quadrupedal movements of cross-country skiers, focusing on both physiological and biomechanical responses, has increased our understanding of the factors that limit human performance.

 

During competitions on varying terrain lasting anywhere from 12 min (4 3-min sprint skiing races) to more than 2 h (for a 50-km race), cross-country skiers must employ a variety of techniques and change often between these, which is highly demanding, both physiologically and in terms of coordination. The aerobic component of the total energy expended is comparable to that associated with other sports involving similar racing times, but cross-country skiers pace themselves by performing more intensely on uphill terrain and utilizing downhill sections for recovery.

 

Physiological research on the demands placed by cross-country skiing has always played an important role in training and improving performance. Endurance training by these skiers includes considerable low-intensity, as well as low-to-moderate levels of high-intensity training, primarily on skis and roller skies and running in varying terrain. Furthermore, the enhanced emphasis on the upper-body required by the new racing events, skiing techniques and equipment/preparation of the snow has markedly improved both endurance and muscle strength in the arms and torso. Altogether, the increased complexity of both physiological (similar aerobic, but more pronounced anaerobic production of energy) and biomechanical demands obviously presents a number of new challenges to athletes and coaches alike. One promising area for development is the utilization of new technology to improve our understanding of cross-country skiing races, including measurements in real time that allow rapid feedback to the athlete.

 

In summary, integration of physiological and biomechanical approaches has and continues to contribute to more detailed and accurate analysis of several determinants of the performance of cross-country skiers, thereby promoting significant improvement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26813OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-26813DiVA: diva2:890824
Conference
20th Annual ECSS Congress in Malmö
Available from: 2016-01-04 Created: 2016-01-04 Last updated: 2016-01-05Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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