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Illustrations in Science Education: An Investigation of Young Pupils Using Explanatory Pictures of Electrical Currents
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Science Education and Mathematics.
2015 (English)In: XVI INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM (IOSTE BORNEO 2014), 2015, 204-210 p.Conference paper, (Refereed)
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Text
Abstract [en]

This study is part of a project regarding explanatory illustrations in science education. Research questions here concern how pupils use and make meaning from illustrations in a science textbook. Electricity was chosen as the subject. Video data was collected in 8 sessions, each with a pair of pupils, 10-11 years of age in one school in Sweden. Communication within the pairs and with the interviewer was analyzed. The children also drew a picture of a battery and explained its function using this drawing. The most striking result was an almost complete lack of transparency for the scientific information in the illustrations. Regardless of previous knowledge, pupils were almost never able to collect new information on their own or together with their peer. As long as the visual information matched previous knowledge they could explain the content, but as the complexity increased, they were lost. They then either expressed their incomprehension or carried on to argue for evident misconceptions, not realizing that the illustrations were contradicting them. Together with the interviewer, pupils could eventually identify central scientific messages and where their previous understanding was challenged. One conclusion is that scientific illustrations can drive scientific in-depth discussion. However, the main conclusion is that pupils are not trained to interpret multimodal information themselves and that teachers and textbook authors therefore risk overestimating pupils de-coding abilities. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. 204-210 p.
Series
Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences, ISSN 1877-0428 ; 167
Keyword [en]
visual information, explanatory illustrations, science education, electricity, primary school
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26546DOI: 10.1016/j.sbspro.2014.12.663ISI: 000361493500029OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-26546DiVA: diva2:883090
Conference
16th Symposium of the International-Organisation-for-Science-and-Technology-Education (IOSTE), SEP 21-27, 2014, Kuching, MALAYSIA
Available from: 2015-12-16 Created: 2015-12-16 Last updated: 2016-12-16Bibliographically approved

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fulltext(257 kB)14 downloads
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ee068e3af085eb92dab0c92204ba834eea83d97b213c391cbcca2c2caf13dd11ccbc39e606972d0bbb4a07cd98412b5a4594c8d90fd52a3e3f58868b8ae7c692
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von Zeipel, Hugo
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Department of Science Education and Mathematics
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf