miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Biomechanics of the ski cross start indoors on a customised training ramp and outdoors on snow
Aalborg Univ, Ctr Sensory Motor Interact, Dept Hlth Sci & Technol, Aalborg, Denmark..
Aalborg Univ, Ctr Sensory Motor Interact, Dept Hlth Sci & Technol, Aalborg, Denmark..
Aalborg Univ, Ctr Sensory Motor Interact, Dept Hlth Sci & Technol, Aalborg, Denmark..
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Center)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3814-6246
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Sports Biomechanics, ISSN 1476-3141, E-ISSN 1752-6116, Vol. 14, no 3, 273-286 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Resource type
Text
Abstract [en]

An effective start enhances an athlete's chances of success in ski cross competitions. Accordingly, this study was designed to investigate the biomechanics of start techniques used by elite athletes and assess the influence of different start environments. Seven elite ski cross athletes performed starts indoors on a custom-built ramp; six of these also performed starts on an outdoor slope. Horizontal and vertical forces were measured by force transducers located in the handles of the start gate and a 12-camera motion capture system allowed monitoring of the sagittal knee, hip, shoulder, and elbow kinematics. The starting movement involved Pre, Pull, and Push phases. Significant differences between body sides were observed for peak vertical and resultant forces, resultant impulse, and peak angular velocity of the shoulder joint. Significantly lower peak vertical forces (44N), higher resultant impulse (0.114Ns/kg), and knee joint range of motion (12 degrees) were observed indoors. Although movement in the ski cross start is generally symmetrical, asymmetric patterns of force were observed among the athletes. Two different movement strategies, i.e. pronounced hip extension or more accentuated elbow flexion, were utilised in the Pull phase. The patterns of force and movement during the indoor and outdoor starts were similar.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 14, no 3, 273-286 p.
Keyword [en]
Asymmetry, kinetics, kinematics, ski cross, start technique
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-26524DOI: 10.1080/14763141.2015.1052543ISI: 000363983900001PubMedID: 26158297Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84946476361OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-26524DiVA: diva2:882969
Available from: 2015-12-16 Created: 2015-12-16 Last updated: 2016-01-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Holmberg, Hans-ChristerKersting, Uwe Gustav
By organisation
Department of Health Sciences
In the same journal
Sports Biomechanics
Sport and Fitness Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 77 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf