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Do Development and Democracy Positively Affect Gender Equality in Cabinets?
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6284-2591
2015 (English)In: Japanese Journal of Political Science, ISSN 1468-1099, E-ISSN 1474-0060, Vol. 16, no 3, 332-356 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has been argued that economic development and democracy create new opportunities and resources for women to access political power, which should increase gender equality in politics. However, empirical evidence from previous research that supports this argument is mixed. The contribution of this study is to expand the research on gender equality in politics through an in-depth examination of the effect of development and democracy on gender equality in cabinets. This has been completed through separate analyses that include most of the countries in the world across three levels of development (least-developed, developing, and developed) and across different types of political regimes (democracies, royal dictatorships, military dictatorships, and civilian dictatorships). The results demonstrate that economic development and democracy only affect gender equality in cabinets positively in a few environments. Accordingly, the context is important and there seem to be thresholds before development and democracy have any effect. Development has a positive effect in developed countries and in democracies, but it has a negative effect in dictatorships, and the negative effect is strongest in military dictatorships. The level of democracy has a positive effect mainly in dictatorships, and the strongest effect is in civilian dictatorships. The article demonstrates the importance of dividing samples into subsets to increase understanding of what affects women's representation in cabinets in different environments, and I ask scholars to subset samples and run separate analyses more often in comparative studies. Copyright © 2015 Cambridge University Press.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 16, no 3, 332-356 p.
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-25907DOI: 10.1017/S1468109915000225ISI: 000359265900006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84938801767OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-25907DiVA: diva2:856300
Note

Export Date: 23 September 2015

Available from: 2015-09-23 Created: 2015-09-23 Last updated: 2015-09-23Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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