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Slip of the tongue: Implications for evolution and language development
Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Psychol, London W1W 6UW, England.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology. Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Fac Med, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London W2 1PG, England.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1209-8802
2015 (English)In: Cognition, ISSN 0010-0277, E-ISSN 1873-7838, Vol. 141, 103-111 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A prevailing theory regarding the evolution of language implicates a gestural stage prior to the emergence of speech. In support of a transition of human language from a gestural to a vocal system, articulation of the hands and the tongue are underpinned by overlapping left hemisphere dominant neural regions. Behavioral studies demonstrate that human adults perform sympathetic mouth actions in imitative synchrony with manual actions. Additionally, right-handedness for precision manual actions in children has been correlated with the typical development of language, while a lack of hand bias has been associated with psychopathology. It therefore stands to reason that sympathetic mouth actions during fine precision motor action of the hands may be lateralized. We employed a fine-grained behavioral coding paradigm to provide the first investigation of tongue protrusions in typically developing 4-year old children. Tongue protrusions were investigated across a range of cognitive tasks that required varying degrees of manual action: precision motor action, gross motor action and no motor actions. The rate of tongue protrusions was influenced by the motor requirements of the task and tongue protrusions were significantly right-biased for only precision manual motor action (p < .001). From an evolutionary perspective, tongue protrusions can drive new investigations regarding how an early human communication system transitioned from hand to mouth. From a developmental perspective, the present study may serve to reveal patterns of tongue protrusions during the motor development of typically developing children. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 141, 103-111 p.
Keyword [en]
Tongue; Language, Cerebral lateralization, Typically developing children
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-25640DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2015.04.012ISI: 000357544300010PubMedID: 25966841Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84928884993OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-25640DiVA: diva2:849469
Available from: 2015-08-28 Created: 2015-08-18 Last updated: 2015-08-28Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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