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Exploring Heterogeneous Tourism Development Paths: Cascade Effect or Co-evolution in Niagara?
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Brock Univ, Dept Geog, St Catharines, ON L2S 3A1, Canada.
Brock Univ, Dept Geog, St Catharines, ON L2S 3A1, Canada.
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 15, no 1-2, 152-166 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tourism is often galvanised around a central theme based on a region's strengths in product supply and promotional opportunity, which usually results in an identifiable regional brand. However, this also hides the existing heterogeneity of tourism supply, especially in regions with an established brand. Securing long-term community economic development requires a broader focus since some unheralded tourism development paths may prove resilient over the long term and ultimately contribute to community development. This paper investigates the less central stakeholders in the Niagara region of Canada and explores how future studies might integrate marginal tourism stakeholders in studies of the regional tourism economy. Through semi-structured interviews with regional tourism stakeholders, the analysis of the Niagara region, based on perspectives of co-evolution from evolutionary economic geography, reveals a new perspective on tourism development by focussing on the place of marginal stakeholders in a region with a strong tourism brand. The region exhibits strong path dependence based on its industrial and agricultural legacy but long-term, organic, incremental processes of change within the region are creating new tourism development paths. These new paths co-evolve with the dominant tourism paths as well as other community development initiatives leading to positive change across the region.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 15, no 1-2, 152-166 p.
Keyword [en]
community economic development, co-evolution, evolutionary economic geography, Niagara, path dependence, rural, tourism
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-25648DOI: 10.1080/15022250.2015.1014182ISI: 000353480800010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84928772225Local ID: ETOUROAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-25648DiVA: diva2:849430
Available from: 2015-08-28 Created: 2015-08-18 Last updated: 2015-08-28Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
  • rtf