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Does restoration fire enhance the regeneration of deciduous trees in boreal forests?: A systematic review
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
2015 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

The prevalent non-intervention policy of protected areas leads, particular in combination with the suppression of forest fires, to increasingly denser forests. This favours shade-tolerant species and outcompete deciduous pioneer species. The latter can be seen as key species in boreal forests and contribute greatly to the forests’ biodiversity. Prescribed fire is considered to serve as a management tool to mimic natural disturbance and enhance the regeneration of deciduous trees. However, the effectiveness of prescribed fires has hardly been evaluated in this regard. A systematic review (SR) was conducted in order to find evidence for the effects of fire on deciduous tree regeneration. A protocol defining all steps, from the search string and the inclusion criteria to the data synthesis in a meta-analysis, was developed. A total of 2135 articles have been consecutively screened on title, abstract and based on the full-text. Data of 37 articles that have passed the screening on full-text have been entered in a systematic map. Seventeen articles were analysed in a meta-analysis. Effect sizes (Hedges g) were calculated for each study and their heterogeneity (Cochran’s Q) was evaluated in several moderator- analyses. Most of the included studies were conducted in North America, investigating post-fire regeneration of either oak (Quercus spp.) or aspen (Populus spp.) forests. Eurasian studies are clearly underrepresented. The study revealed higher response effects of aspen and birch (Betula spp.) and a smaller but still significant effect for oak and hickory (Carya spp.). The combination of fire with a thinning-treatment showed the highest effects and was significant for aspen and birches in comparison to non-fire comparators. However, there was no evidence found that the fire effect is enduring over longer time periods or that fire actually could ensure the long term persistence of aspen in the forest. Further research, which report

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. , 41 p.
Keyword [en]
prescribed burning, post-fire regeneration, systematic review, meta-analysis, Populus, Betula
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-25194OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-25194DiVA: diva2:824323
Subject / course
Biology BI1
Educational program
Master by Research TPRMA 120 higher education credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2015-06-22 Created: 2015-06-18 Last updated: 2015-06-22Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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  • nn-NB
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