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Lessons Learned from U.S. Experience with Regional Landscape Governance: Implications for Conservation and Protected Areas
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. (ETOUR)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3887-681X
University of Vermont.
University of Vermont.
Living Landscape Observer, USA.
2015 (English)In: Nature Policies and Landscape Policies: Towards an Alliance / [ed] R Gambino and A Peano, Springer, 2015, 323-330 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is generally acknowledged that protected areas do not encompass the scale necessary for effective conservation of socio-ecological systems. Consequently, there have been repeated calls for a "new paradigm" for conservation that transitions from "islands" to "networks." By extending conservation to reflect wider landscape perspectives, this approach integrates community development and economic and quality of life interests, thereby forging productive relationships between protected areas and their regional context. This broadened agenda involves many more landowners, organizations, and levels of government and requires coordination, partnerships, and new forms of governance. Drawing from nearly a decade of research, this contribution examines US experience with this new paradigm for conservation and models of network governance. The findings from this research program indicate that three key dimensions are fundamental to governance: engaging a diversity of stakeholders and building consensus, creating and sustaining ongoing networks of partners, and developing a central hub for the network. This central coordinating and facilitating function appears to be an essential governance element as it is the activity of these networks of private and public partners that deliver accomplishments. This contribution suggests that despite their challenges, networked-based models can strengthen social capital at regional levels, thereby increasing capacity for innovation, adaptation, and resiliency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015. 323-330 p.
Keyword [en]
Evaluation research case studies, Governance, Networks, Regional landscape conservation
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-24359DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-05410-0_37Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84945124821Local ID: ETOURISBN: 978-3-319-05410-0 (print)ISBN: 978-3-319-05409-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-24359DiVA: diva2:787522
Available from: 2015-02-10 Created: 2015-02-10 Last updated: 2016-11-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf