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The influence of surface on the running velocities of elite and amateur orienteer athletes
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
Culture Sport Health Society and Exercise Performance Health Innovation Platform, Franche-Comté University, Besançon, France .
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3814-6246
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 24, no 6, 448--455 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We compared the reduction in running velocities from road to off-road terrain in eight elite and eight amateur male orienteer athletes to investigate whether this factor differentiates elite from amateur athletes. On two separate days, each subject ran three 2-km time trials and three 20-m sprints "all-out" on a road, on a path, and in a forest. On a third day, the running economy and maximal aerobic power of individuals were assessed on a treadmill. The elite orienteer ran faster than the amateur on all three surfaces and at both distances, in line with their better running economy and aerobic power. In the forest, the elites ran at a slightly higher percentage of their 2-km (∼3%) and 20-m (∼4%) road velocities. Although these differences did not exhibit traditional statistical significance, magnitude-based inferences suggested likely meaningful differences, particularly during 20-m sprinting. Of course, cognitive, mental, and physical attributes other than the ability to run on different surfaces are required for excellence in orienteering (e.g., a high aerobic power). However, we suggest that athlete-specific assessment of running performance on various surfaces and distances might assist in tailoring training and identifying individual strengths and/or weaknesses in an orienteer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 24, no 6, 448--455 p.
Keyword [en]
Athletic performance, Field testing, Foot orienteering, Off-road, Sport surface, Sprint, Time trial
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-23796DOI: 10.1111/sms.12224ISI: 000345703300004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84912045348OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-23796DiVA: diva2:772093
Available from: 2014-12-16 Created: 2014-12-16 Last updated: 2015-01-02Bibliographically approved

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Hébert-Losier, KimJensen, KurtHolmberg, Hans-Christer
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CiteExportLink to record
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