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Infant locomotive development and its association with adult blood pressure.
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, United Kingdom .
Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland .
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, United Kingdom .
Department of Primary care and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom .
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2014 (English)In: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 173, no 10, 1309-17 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

UNLABELLED: Evidence from animal models suggests that locomotion and blood pressure share common neurophysiological regulatory systems. As a result of this common regulation, we hypothesized that the development of locomotion in human infants would be associated with blood pressure levels in adulthood. The study sample comprised 4,347 individuals with measures of locomotive and non-locomotive neuromotor development in infancy and adult blood pressure levels within a longitudinal birth cohort study, the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966. Later development in all three stages of locomotive development during infancy was associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels at age 31. For age of walking without support, 0.34 (95 % CI 0.07 to 0.60)-mm Hg higher SBP and 0.38 (95 % CI 0.15 to 0.62)-mm Hg higher DBP were estimated for each month of later achievement (P = 0.012 for SBP; P = 0.001 for DBP). No association was identified for non-locomotive neuromotor development.

CONCLUSION: These results highlight the positive sequelae of advanced locomotive development during infancy, suggesting that the common regulatory systems between locomotion and blood pressure may influence the development of raised blood pressure over time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 173, no 10, 1309-17 p.
Keyword [en]
Neurodevelopment, Infancy, Child development, Blood pressure, Epidemiology, Cohort studies
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-23360DOI: 10.1007/s00431-014-2326-2ISI: 000342227700005PubMedID: 24804637Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84918795259OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-23360DiVA: diva2:761342
Available from: 2014-11-06 Created: 2014-11-06 Last updated: 2015-01-05Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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