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THE INFLUENCE OF THE TIME OF DAY ON CORE TEMPERATURE AND LOWER BODY POWER OUTPUT IN ELITE RUGBY UNION SEVENS PLAYERS
Northumbria Univ, Sch Life Sci, Dept Sport & Exercise Sci, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST, Tyne & Wear, England.
UK Sport, Res & Innovat, Bath, Avon, England.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
Swansea Univ, Coll Engn, Swansea, W Glam, Wales.
2014 (English)In: JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH, ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 28, no 6, 1524-1528 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Core temperature typically displays a low circadian in the morning before peaking later in the day, and these changes occur within small physiological ranges. Body temperature plays an important role in physical performance, and some athletes may be required to train and compete in both the morning and evening. However, the influence of the circadian change in body temperature and its influence on physical performance in elite athletes are unclear. This study examined the effects of the time of day on core temperature and lower body power output in elite rugby union sevens players. Sixteen elite rugby union sevens players completed morning (in AM) countermovement jump and core temperature (T-core) measurement, which were then repeated later the same day (in PM). Countermovement jump was processed for peak power output (PPO). Data were analyzed using paired samples t-test and Pearson's product moment correlation and are presented in mean +/- SD. T-core significantly increased from AM to PM (AM, 36.92 +/- 0.23 vs. PM, 37.18 +/- 0.188 degrees C; P < 0.001) with PPO significantly increasing from AM to PM in all 16 players (AM, 5248 +/- 366 vs. PM, 5413 +/- 361 W; P < 0.001). The delta change in T-core (0.26 +/- 0.138 degrees C) and PPO (164 +/- 78 W) was significantly related (r = 0.781; P < 0.001). In conclusion, small circadian changes in core temperature can influence physical performance in elite athletes. Coaches should seek to use strategies, which may raise morning body temperature to offset the circadian low in the morning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 28, no 6, 1524-1528 p.
Keyword [en]
Body temperature, Circadian rhythm, Performance
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22606ISI: 000337152800005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84902077305OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-22606DiVA: diva2:738863
Available from: 2014-08-19 Created: 2014-08-19 Last updated: 2015-07-01Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
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More styles
Language
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More languages
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