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Morning based strength training improves afternoon physical performance in rugby union players
UK Sport, London, United Kingdom.
Applied Sports Technology Exercise and Medicine Research Centre (A-STEM), Health and Sport Portfolio, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom .
Hamlyn Centre, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom .
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, ISSN 1878-1861, Vol. 17, no 3, 317-321 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectivesTo determine if a morning training session could alter afternoon physical performance. Moreover, as testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) concentrations are significant predictors of physical performance, and both show circadian declines across the day, we examined the effects of morning training on diurnal T and C responses. DesignEighteen semi-professional rugby union players completed this randomised and counter-balanced study. MethodsFollowing morning saliva collection (0900. h), players completed a control (rested), Sprint (5 × 40 m) or Weights (3 repetition-maximum [RM] bench press and squat) trial. In the afternoon (15:00. h) of each trial, a further saliva sample was collected before players completed a performance test (3RM back squat and bench press, 40. m sprint, countermovement jump [CMJ]). ResultsSalivary T concentrations declined from am to pm under Control and Sprint, but not under Weights. Delta T, from am to pm, was greater under Control (-10.9±2.4pgml-1) compared to Sprints (-6.2±7.1pgml-1) and Weights (-1.2±5.5pgml-1) (p≤0.001). Delta C, from am to pm, was greater under Control compared to both Sprint and Weights (p<0.05). Players elicited better CMJ peak power, 40-m time, 3RM bench and squat performance under Weights compared with Control and Sprint (p<0.05). Faster 40-m times were seen under Sprint, when compared to Control (p<0.05). ConclusionsPerforming morning strength training is associated with improved physical performance in the afternoon. Additionally, the circadian decline in T concentrations appeared offset by morning training. However, it is unclear if T concentrations are, in part, causal of these improved responses or simply a reflective marker. © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 17, no 3, 317-321 p.
Keyword [en]
Potentiation, Power, Steroid hormone, Strength, Testosterone
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22039DOI: 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.04.016ISI: 000336240200014Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84899659648OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-22039DiVA: diva2:720703
Note

Language of Original Document: English

Available from: 2014-06-02 Created: 2014-05-30 Last updated: 2014-07-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
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