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Study of Patient Information after percutaneous Coronary Intervention (SPICI): should prevention programmes become more effective?
Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
Falun Hospital, Falun, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Swedish PCI AB, Karlstad, Sweden.
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2015 (English)In: EuroIntervention, ISSN 1774-024X, E-ISSN 1969-6213, Vol. 10, no 11, e1-e7 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: This cross-sectional observational study was designed to evaluate the uptake and outcome of patient education after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods and results: A questionnaire containing 41 items was handed out to consecutive patients from randomly selected Swedish hospitals after PCI. Questions concerned the patient's attribution of the cause of the cardiac event, perception of the information provided by physicians and nurses, and a self-assessment of changes in lifestyle post PCI regarding tobacco, physical activity, food habits and stress. Replies were obtained from 1,073 patients (reply rate 67%). Non-modifiable risk factors (age, heredity) were attributed a higher rate as the cause of disease compared to modifiable factors (smoking, physical activity, food habits). Most patients (67%) perceived they were cured, and 38% perceived from the given information that there was no need to change their habits. A mere 27% reported that they still had cardiovascular disease and needed behavioural change. After PCI, 16% continued to use tobacco; half of these were offered smoking cessation support. In spite of an 80% referral rate to cardiac rehabilitation, one out of two patients did not enrol. Fewer than half were regularly physically active. Nutritional counselling was provided to 71%, but only 40% changed food habits. Stress management programmes were rarely provided. Conclusions: Current preventive practice scarcely meets the challenge posed by the progress in modern invasive cardiology. The Study of Patient Information after percutaneous Coronary Intervention (SPICI) motivates an in-depth revision and adaptation of cardiac rehabilitation programmes in order to improve patient understanding of the disease, and to support greater compliance with a cardioprotective lifestyle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 10, no 11, e1-e7 p.
Keyword [en]
Cardiac rehabilitation, Compliance, Coronary artery disease, Lifestyle, Patient education, Percutaneous coronary intervention
National Category
Psychology Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-21780DOI: 10.4244/EIJV10I11A223PubMedID: 24472705Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84927591363OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-21780DiVA: diva2:712607
Available from: 2014-04-15 Created: 2014-04-15 Last updated: 2015-08-13Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full textPubMedScopushttp://www.pcronline.com/eurointervention/ahead_of_print/201401-13/

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CiteExportLink to record
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