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Risk perception, choice of drinking water and water treatment: Evidence from Kenyan towns
Institute for Development Studies, University of Nairobi, PO Box 30197, Nairobi, Kenya .
Strathmore Business School, Ole Sangale Road,PO Box 59857, Madaraka, 00200 Nairobi, Kenya.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law. Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, 971 87 Luleå, Swede.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7206-6568
2014 (English)In: Journal of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development, ISSN 2043-9083, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 268-280Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study used household survey data from four Kenyan towns to examine the effect of households’ characteristics and risk perceptions on their decision to treat/filter water as well as on their choice of main drinking water source. Because the two decisions may be jointly made by the household, a seemingly unrelated bivariate probit model was estimated. It turned out that treating non-piped water and using piped water as a main drinking water source were substitutes. The evidence supports the finding that perceived risks significantly correlate with a household’s decision to treat non-piped water before drinking it. The study also found that higher connection fees reduced the likelihood of households connecting to the piped network. Because the current connection fee acts as a cost hurdle which deters households from getting a connection, the study recommends a system where households pay the connection fee in instalments, through a prepaid water scheme or through a subsidy scheme.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 4, no 2, p. 268-280
Keywords [en]
drinking water, subjective risk perception, water quality, water treatment
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-21491DOI: 10.2166/washdev.2014.131ISI: 000341563300010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84904760066OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-21491DiVA, id: diva2:699936
Projects
Agriculture in African countries - information and market power
Funder
FormasSida - Swedish International Development Cooperation AgencyThe Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius FoundationAvailable from: 2014-03-03 Created: 2014-03-03 Last updated: 2014-10-13Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf