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Elder abuse and socioeconomic inequalities: A multilevel study in 7 European countries
Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
Department of Public Health Science, Protestant University of Applied Sciences, Ludwigsburg, Germany.
Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
CIBERSAM, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
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2014 (English)In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 61, p. 42-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives To compare the prevalence of elder abuse using a multilevel approach that takes into account the characteristics of participants as well as socioeconomic indicators at city and country level.

Methods In 2009, the project on abuse of elderly in Europe (ABUEL) was conducted in seven cities (Stuttgart, Germany; Ancona, Italy; Kaunas, Lithuania, Stockholm, Sweden; Porto, Portugal; Granada, Spain; Athens, Greece) comprising 4467 individuals aged 60–84 years. We used a 3-level hierarchical structure of data: 1) characteristics of participants; 2) mean of tertiary education of each city; and 3) country inequality indicator (Gini coefficient). Multilevel logistic regression was used and proportional changes in Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) were inspected to assert explained variance between models.

Results The prevalence of elder abuse showed large variations across sites. Adding tertiary education to the regression model reduced the country level variance for psychological abuse (ICC = 3.4%), with no significant decrease in the explained variance for the other types of abuse. When the Gini coefficient was considered, the highest drop in ICC was observed for financial abuse (from 9.5% to 4.3%).

Conclusion There is a societal and community level dimension that adds information to individual variability in explaining country differences in elder abuse, highlighting underlying socioeconomic inequalities leading to such behavior.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 61, p. 42-47
Keywords [en]
Elder abuse, Inequalities, Multinational study, Violence
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20984DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.01.008ISI: 000333545300008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84893648184OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-20984DiVA, id: diva2:685235
Available from: 2014-01-09 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Soares, Joaquim

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