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Repeated sprint exercise impairs contractile force of isolated single human muscle fibers
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
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2013 (English)In: Proceedings for the 6th International Congress on Science and Skiing / [ed] Erich Mueller, Josef Kröll, Stefan Josef Lindinger, Jurgen Pfusterschmied, Thomas Stöggl, 2013, 93- p.Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the present study was, to examine the effects of repeated sprint skiing on the contractile apparatus of single muscle fibres obtained from a group of elite skiers. We have recently demonstrated that prolonged cycling exercise impairs the contractile apparatus of single muscle fibres, and that this can be restored following recovery. However, little is known about the effect of repeated high intensity exercise on single fibre properties, as i.e. during cross-country (cc) sprint competitions. We hypothesize that repeated high intensity exercise in highly trained subjects will impair the contractile apparatus maximum force output.

METHOD: Eleven elite male sprint talented cc skiers (age 24 ± 4 years; VO2max 5.1 ± 0.5 (diagonal skiing, DIA), 4.9 ± 0.5 (double pooling, DP) L·min-1)) volunteered for the study. The skiers performed a simulated intermittent classic sprint roller skiing competition on a treadmill. The sprint exercise included 4 times1300m, with 45 min recovery between sprints. Each sprint consisted of 3 DP sections (1° uphill) and 2 DIA sections (7° uphill). Muscle biopsies were obtained in arm muscle (m. biceps brachii) before and after the sprint exercises. Muscle fibre bundles were cooled and skinned in a glycerinating solution and stored until analyzed. Single muscle fibre segments (n=232) were isolated and attached to a sensitive force recording transducer, and activated by Ca2+ buffered solutions at pH 7.1 to measure mechanically properties (maximum force Po and Po/cross sectional area (CSA)) and fibre typed by the Sr2+ sensitivity (Hvid et al. 2013).

RESULTS: Average sprint time was 3min 49s ± 9s, with no difference between sprints. A total of 232 fibres were analysed (150 type I and 82 type II fibres). Type II fibres had a sign. (P<0.05) higher CSA (8103 ± 2334 µm2 (type I) and 8852 ± 2288 µm2 (type II) and Po (0.82 ± 0.43 and 1.24 ± 0.50 mN) than type I fibres. Also type II fibres had a 31% higher Po/CSA (108 ± 55 vs 142 ± 45 kN/m2). Following the intermittent sprint exercise, type II fibres exhibited a sign. (P = 0.01) 20% decrease in Po, with no difference in type I fibres. To test if the decrease in the single fibre Po were associated with oxidative stress we tested if this could be reversed with a strong reducing agent (dithiothreitol, DTT). DTT did not alter Po at pre nor the decrease in type II fibres following sprint exercise.

DISCUSSION: By using a translational approach from whole body exercise to single fibre measurements, we here we demonstrate that type II fibres from highly trained cross country skiers, has a 20% decrease in Po following repeated sprint. Thus, part of the experienced fatigue following sprint competitions is due to impairments at the level of the contractile apparatus. Further, we did not find any evidence for oxidative stress as a causative component in the observed decrease in Po.

CONCLUSION: Here we demonstrate for the first time, in highly trained sprint skiers, that repeated sprint impairs single fibre maximum force at the level of the contractile apparatus, which may have a significant impact on muscle function and fatigue.

REFERENCES: Gejl K, Hvid LG, Ulrik Frandsen U, Jensen K, Sahlin K and Ørtenblad N. Muscle glycogen content modifies SR Ca2+ release rate in elite endurance athletes. Med. Sci. Sports Ex. (2013).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. 93- p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20938ISBN: 978-3-200-03417-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-20938DiVA: diva2:683070
Conference
6th International Congress on Science and Skiing
Available from: 2014-01-02 Created: 2014-01-02 Last updated: 2014-01-03Bibliographically approved

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