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Additive Manufacturing for Medical and Biomedical Applications: Advances and Challenges
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. (SportsTech)
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. (SportsTech)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5954-5898
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. (SportsTech)
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
2014 (English)In: Materials Science Forum, ISSN 0255-5476, E-ISSN 1662-9752, p. 1286-1291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Additive Manufacturing (AM) has solidly established itself not only in rapid prototyping but also in industrial manufacturing. Its success is mainly determined by a possibility of manufacturing components with extremely complex shapes with minimal material waste. Rapid development of AM technologies includes processes using unique new materials, which in some cases is very hard or impossible to process any other way. Along with traditional industrial applications AM methods are becoming quite successful in biomedical applications, in particular in implant and special tools manufacturing. Here the capacity of AM technologies in producing components with complex geometric shapes is often brought to extreme.

Certain issues today are preventing the AM methods taking its deserved place in medical and biomedical applications. Present work reports on the advances in further developing of AM technology, as well as in related post-processing, necessary to address the challenges presented by biomedical applications. Particular examples used are from Electron Beam Melting (EBM), one of the methods from the AM family.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. p. 1286-1291
Keywords [en]
additive manufacturing, electron beam melting, implants, multi-parameter optimization, multi-dimensional design
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20589Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84904552095OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-20589DiVA, id: diva2:677555
Conference
8th International Conference on Processing and Manufacturing of Advanced Materials, THERMEC 2013; Las Vegas, NV; United States; 2 December 2013 through 6 December 2013; Code 105675
Available from: 2013-12-10 Created: 2013-12-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Koptyug, AndreyRännar, Lars-ErikBäckström, MikaelCronskär, Marie

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