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Effect of slope and footwear on running economy and kinematics
Research Unit EA4660, Culture Sport Health Society and Exercise Performance Health Innovation Platform, Franche-Comté University, Besançon, France .
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (NVC)
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (NVC)
Research Unit EA4660, Culture Sport Health Society and Exercise Performance Health Innovation Platform, Franche-Comté University, Besançon, France .
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 23, no 4, p. e246-e253Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lower energy cost of running (Cr) has been reported when wearing minimal (MS) vs traditional shoes (TS) on level terrain, but the effect of slope on this difference is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare Cr, physiological, and kinematic variables from running in MS and TS on different slope conditions. Fourteen men (23.4 +/- 4.4 years; 177.5 +/- 5.2cm; 69.5 +/- 5.3kg) ran 14 5-min trials in a randomized sequence at 10km/h on a treadmill. Subjects ran once wearing MS and once wearing TS on seven slopes, from -8% to +8%. We found that Cr increased with slope gradient (P<0.01) and was on average 1.3% lower in MS than TS (P<0.01). However, slope did not influence the Cr difference between MS and TS. In MS, contact times were lower (P<0.01), flight times (P=0.01) and step frequencies (P=0.02) were greater at most slope gradients, and plantar-foot angles - and often ankle plantar-flexion (P=0.01) - were greater (P<0.01). The 1.3% difference between footwear identified here most likely stemmed from the difference in shoe mass considering that the Cr difference was independent of slope gradient and that the between-footwear kinematic alterations with slope provided limited explanations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 23, no 4, p. e246-e253
Keywords [en]
Energy expenditure, Kinematics, Oxygen consumption, Running, Shoes
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-19929DOI: 10.1111/sms.12057ISI: 000321760100006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84880512625OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-19929DiVA, id: diva2:655161
Available from: 2013-10-10 Created: 2013-09-25 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Fabre, NicolasHébert-Losier, Kim

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