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Using the Psychopathic Personality Inventory to identify subtypes of antisocial personality disorder
Texas A and M University, United States.
Texas A and M University, United States.
Texas A and M University, United States.
Emory University, United States.
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2013 (English)In: Journal of criminal justice, ISSN 0047-2352, E-ISSN 1873-6203, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 125-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Poythress, Edens, et al. (2010) recently used cluster analysis to identify subtypes of antisocial and psychopathic offenders using a diverse collection of theoretically important clustering variables. Two predicted subtypes, primary and secondary psychopathy, were identified, in addition to non-psychopathic and (unexpectedly) "fearful" psychopathic offenders. The purpose of the present research was to determine whether these clusters could be replicated using a single self-report measure, the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; Lilienfeld & Andrews, 1996). Method: Study 1: We used discriminant function analysis (DFA) to predict cluster membership for the Poythress et al. subtypes based solely on the eight subscales of the PPI. Results: Study 1: Though overall classification accuracy with the original clusters was poor, PPI-derived subtypes differed from each other in theoretically consistent ways on several criterion measures. Method: Study 2: We used the PPI-based DFA to classify a separate sample of prison inmates from a prior PPI study (Edens et al., 2008). Results: Study 2: As predicted, inmates classified into the secondary psychopathy subgroup demonstrated the highest rates of aggressive misconduct whereas non-psychopathic were the least prone to engage in misconduct. Conclusion: The PPI may serve as a relatively simple method of identifying theoretically meaningful subtypes of psychopathic offenders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 41, no 2, p. 125-134
National Category
Sociology Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-18642DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2012.12.001ISI: 000315702300009Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84874288663OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-18642DiVA, id: diva2:613554
Note

CODEN: JCJUD

Available from: 2013-03-28 Created: 2013-03-27 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Douglas, Kevin S.

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • de-DE
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More languages
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