miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Aerodynamic drag is not the major determinant of performance during giant slalom skiing at the elite level
(Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 23, no 1, p. e38-e47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This investigation was designed to (a) develop an individualized mechanical model for measuring aerodynamic drag (Fd) while ski racing through multiple gates, (b) estimate energy dissipation (Ed) caused by Fd and compare this to the total energy loss (Et), and (c) investigate the relative contribution of Ed/Et to performance during giant slalom skiing (GS). Nine elite skiers were monitored in different positions and with different wind velocities in a wind tunnel, as well as during GS and straight downhill skiing employing a Global Navigation Satellite System. On the basis of the wind tunnel measurements, a linear regression model of drag coefficient multiplied by cross-sectional area as a function of shoulder height was established for each skier (r > 0.94, all P < 0.001). Skiing velocity, Fd, Et, and Ed per GS turn were 15–21 m/s, 20–60 N, −11 to −5 kJ, and −2.3 to −0.5 kJ, respectively. Ed/Et ranged from ∼5% to 28% and the relationship between Et/vin and Ed was r = −0.12 (all NS). In conclusion, (a) Fd during alpine skiing was calculated by mechanical modeling, (b) Ed made a relatively small contribution to Et, and (c) higher relative Ed was correlated to better performance in elite GS skiers, suggesting that reducing ski–snow friction can improve this performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2013. Vol. 23, no 1, p. e38-e47
Keywords [en]
Alpine skiing; Force; Global Navigation Satellite System; GPS; Mechanics; Ski racing; Wind tunnel
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-18148DOI: 10.1111/sms.12007ISI: 000313522500009Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84872290295OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-18148DiVA, id: diva2:583849
Available from: 2013-01-08 Created: 2013-01-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Holmberg, Hans-Christer

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Holmberg, Hans-Christer
By organisation
Department of Health Sciences
In the same journal
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 166 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf