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Deliverable 1.2 Analysis of promising sustainable renovation concepts: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development. (Ecotechnology)
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2011 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The report focuses on analyses of the most promising existing sustainable renovationconcepts, i.e. full-service concepts and technical concepts, for single-family houses. As abasis for the analyses a detailed building stock analysis was carried out. Furthermore, ageneral method as proposal for package solutions for sustainable renovation is described. Themethod contains investigation of the house, proposal for sustainable renovation and detailedplanning as well as commissioning after renovation.The building stock analysis shows that detached single-family houses account for large shareof the total number of dwellings in all Nordic countries. Electric heating (and oil heating) ofsingle-family houses is very common in the Nordic countries, except for Denmark whereoil/gas boiler and district heating is mostly used. Natural ventilation is widespread inDenmark while mechanical ventilation is also often used in Norway, Sweden and Finland.Houses in Norway, Sweden and Finland are typically built with wood as a main constructionmaterial, but the insulation and/or finishing materials differ. In Denmark bricks are used as adominant construction material for cavity walls.The typical single-family houses identified to have large primary energy saving potentialalmost descend from the same time period in each Nordic country. The first segment is housesbuilt in large numbers in the 1960 and 1970. The second segment is houses built before 1940pre-war (except for Finland) where a large part of them has been renovated, but energyrenovation of those houses today would still account for a large energy saving. The thirdsegment is houses from the post-war period in Finland, houses that are all individual but builtin the same way, using the same materials.Existing full-service renovation concepts in the Nordic countries have just recently enteredthe market and are not well established and their success is yet to be evaluated. Companiesmay improve concepts by a more integrated approach and application of the full range oftechnical solutions to ensure the homeowner a sustainable renovation to a reasonable price.Energy efficiency calculations for individual measures for each of the typical single-familyhouses in the Nordic countries were made, and also some examples of cost analysis based onthe criterion of cost of conserved energy (CCE) that takes into account the investment andrunning cost and savings during a defined relevant reference period.Different technical renovation scenarios consisting of energy efficiency measures have beentested for the typical single-family houses with large energy saving potential in each of theNordic countries. Energy efficiency measures in connection with renovation of single-familyhouses have the potential for very large energy savings. In general the analyses show thattypical single-family houses can be renovated to the level of energy performance required fornew houses today or in some cases to low-energy level. Reaching passive house level may bechallenging in old houses. Passive house level was not reached in any of the analysed cases.Positive impact on the indoor environment can be expected. Thermal comfort will beimproved by insulation and air-tightness measures that will increase surface temperatures andreduce draught from e.g. badly insulated windows. A ventilation system with heat recoverywill also contribute to a good thermal comfort by draught-free supply of fresh air and assurean excellent air quality. Overheating can effectively be avoided by external movable solarshadings and/or higher venting rate by use of e.g. automatically controlled windows.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. , 112 p.
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17915OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-17915DiVA: diva2:578819
Projects
Successful Sustainable Renovation Business for Single-Family Houses - SuccessFamilies
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-12-19 Last updated: 2012-12-19Bibliographically approved

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D1.2 Analysis of promising sustainable renovation concepts

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Mahapatra, KrushnaGustavsson, Leif
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Citation style
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  • en-US
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