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Self-reported physical activity and aerobic fitness are differently related to mental health
Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Box 300, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
Institute of Stress Medicine, Carl Skottsbergs gata 22B, 413 19 Gothenburg, Sweden.
Institute of Stress Medicine, Carl Skottsbergs gata 22B, 413 19 Gothenburg, Sweden.
2012 (English)In: Mental Health and Physical Activity, ISSN 1755-2966, Vol. 5, no 1, 28-34 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A relevant, but overlooked question is if self-reported physical activity and aerobic fitness are differently related to mental health. Purpose: To examine the relation between mental health and level of self-reported physical activity (SRPA) and aerobic fitness (AF), and whether AF mediates the relation between SRPA and mental health. Methods: Participating in the study were 177 voluntary subjects (49% men, 51% women) with a mean age of 39 years. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were measured through the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale, and the Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ) was used to evaluate self-reported symptoms of burnout. Leisure time SRPA during the last three months were measured using a single item. AF was measured by using the Åstrand bicycle test. Results: Self-reported physical activity, but not AF, was significantly related to self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, and burnout. Light to moderate physical activity that is performed regularly seems to be associated with more favorable mental health pattern compared with physical inactivity. No support was found for the mediating effect of AF of the physical activity-mental health relationship. Conclusions: Self-reported behavior of regular physical activity seems to be more important to monitor than measures of AF when considering the potential preventive effects of physical activity on mental health. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 5, no 1, 28-34 p.
Keyword [en]
Anxiety; Burnout; Depression; Fitness; Physical activity
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-16720DOI: 10.1016/j.mhpa.2011.12.003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84861591135OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-16720DiVA: diva2:546045
Available from: 2012-08-22 Created: 2012-08-17 Last updated: 2013-01-09Bibliographically approved

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