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Addiction treatment in deprived urban areas in EU countries: Accessibility of care for people from socially marginalized groups
Department of Studies on Alcohol and Drug Dependence, Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, ul. Sobieskiego 9, 02-957 Warsaw, Poland.
Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom.
Department of Studies on Alcohol and Drug Dependence, Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, ul. Sobieskiego 9, 02-957 Warsaw, Poland.
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Predictive Medicine and Public Health, University of Porto Medical School, Porto, Portugal.
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2013 (English)In: Drugs: education prevention and policy, ISSN 0968-7637, E-ISSN 1465-3370, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 74-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study examines the accessibility of addiction treatment within services providing mental health care and support for people from socially marginalized groups in deprived urban areas across EU countries.Methods: Services providing mental health care and support in deprived areas of 14 EU capital cities were assessed with a questionnaire. We analysed the availability and accessibility of those services providing addiction treatment for people from six groups: the long-term unemployed, the homeless, street sex workers, asylum seekers and refugees, irregular migrants and people from travelling communities.Results: While 30% of all the assessed services provided addiction treatment, in 20% of services, addiction was a criterion for exclusion. Among services providing addiction treatment, 77% accepted self-referrals, 63% were open on weekends or in the evening, 60% did not charge any out-of-pocket fees, 35% provided access to interpreters, and 28% ran outreach activities. These results varied substantially among EU capitals.Conclusion: Access to addiction treatment for socially marginalized groups varies across Europe. Some of the models identified may constitute barriers to treatment. Developing care delivery models that facilitate access for vulnerable populations should be a priority for national and European policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 20, no 1, p. 74-83
Keywords [en]
Mental-health-care; Ethnic-minority Groups; Substance Use; Assertive Outreach; Use Disorders; Psychiatric-services; European Countries; Sex Workers; Drug-use; Alcohol
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-16578DOI: 10.3109/09687637.2012.706757ISI: 000313680100010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84872298156OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-16578DiVA, id: diva2:537467
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Publ online 2012

Available from: 2012-06-26 Created: 2012-06-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Soares, Joaquim J. F.

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