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INSULIN SENSITIVITY AFTER MAXIMAL AND ENDURANCE RESISTANCE TRAINING
Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Neurosci, N-7034 Trondheim, Norway .
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6558-3129
Nord Trondelag Univ Coll, Fac Educ, Levanger, Norway .
Oslo Univ Hosp Aker, Hormone Lab, Oslo, Norway.
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 327-334Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hansen, E, Landstad, BJ, Gundersen, KT, Torjesen, PA, and Svebak, S. Insulin sensitivity after maximal and endurance resistance training. J Strength Cond Res 26(2): 327-334, 2012-The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of maximal resistance training (MRT) vs. endurance resistance training (ERT) on improvements in insulin levels and glucose tolerance in overweight individuals at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Eighteen participants with baseline values suggesting impaired glucose tolerance were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. Group 1 engaged in supervised MRT (Bernstein inverted pyramid system: 5 x 3-4, 60-85% 1 repetition maximum [1RM]), 3 d.wk(-1) over 4 months, whereas members of group 2 acted as controls. Later, group 2 engaged in supervised ERT (3 x 12-15, 45-65% 1RM), 3 d.wk(-1) over a 4 month period with the 2 prebaselines as controls. Both interventions consisted of 8 exercises that included the entire body. Glucose (fasting and 2-hour test), insulin and C-peptide measures were assessed from pre to post in both groups. The MRT led to reduced blood levels of 2-hour glucose (p = 0.044) and fasting C-peptide (p = 0.023) and decreased insulin resistance (p = 0.040). The ERT caused a significant reduction in the blood levels of insulin (p = 0.023) and concomitant positive effects on % insulin sensitivity (p=0.054) and beta-cell function (p=0.020). The findings indicate that both MRT and ERT lead to decreased insulin resistance in people with a risk of developing type 2 diabetes; MRT led to a greater increase in glucose uptake capacity (in muscles), whereas ERT led to greater insulin sensitivity, supporting the recommendation of both MRT and ERT as primary intervention approaches for individuals at a risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 26, no 2, p. 327-334
Keywords [en]
beta-cell function, exercise, glucose tolerance, IGT, insulin resistance, strength training
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-16201DOI: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e318220e70fISI: 000299857600003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84859787103OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-16201DiVA, id: diva2:526408
Available from: 2012-05-11 Created: 2012-05-11 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Hansen, ElisabethLandstad, Bodil J.

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