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Barns självrapporterade hälsa: Betydelsen av socialt kapital i skolan och närområdet
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
2012 (Swedish)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mittuniversitetet , 2012. , p. 46
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 121
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-15887ISBN: 978-91-87103-04-9 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-15887DiVA, id: diva2:503757
Public defence
2012-03-16, F234, Mittuniversitetet, Östersund, 10:30 (Swedish)
Available from: 2012-02-17 Created: 2012-02-16 Last updated: 2012-07-30Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Health outcomes among Swedish children: the role of social capital in the family, school, and neighbourhood
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health outcomes among Swedish children: the role of social capital in the family, school, and neighbourhood
2012 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 101, no 5, p. 513-517Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of the study was to explore the extent to which Swedish children's perceptions of social capital in the family, school and neighbourhood predicted health complaints and well-being. Methods: The study used data from the Swedish Health Behaviour in School-agedChildren survey. The sample consisted of 3926 children aged 11-15 years. Correlations and hierarchical multiple linear regression were performed. Results: Higher degrees of family, school and neighbourhood social capital corresponded to lower levels of health complaints and higher levels of well-being. Social capital in these three spheres had a cumulative effect on children's health and well-being. Conclusions: Social capital in the family, school and neighbourhood matters for children's health and well-being and the contributions from each context seem to be additive. Besides the family context, investments for improving child health should primarily be in the school, focusing on social relations and on creating safe and cohesive school environments. Neighbourhood social capital is also of importance and so must be taken into consideration when planning childhealth promotion interventions. © 2011 The Author(s)/Acta Pædiatrica.

Keyword
Adolescence; Health Behaviour in School-aged Children; Health complaints; Health promotion; Well-being
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14903 (URN)10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02579.x (DOI)000302349200031 ()2-s2.0-84859594158 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-11-24 Created: 2011-11-24 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
2. School demands and subjective health complaints among Swedish schoolchildren: A multilevel study
Open this publication in new window or tab >>School demands and subjective health complaints among Swedish schoolchildren: A multilevel study
2010 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 344-350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: As children spend a great deal of their time in school, the climate in the classroom can constitute a resource, but also a risk factor in the development of the pupils' health. The aim of the present study was to determine the extent to which demands in the classroom are associated with subjective health complaints in Swedish schoolchildren. Methods: Data from the 2001/2002 and 2005/2006 Swedish cross-national Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey were analysed using a multilevel logistic regression technique. Results: The study demonstrated a substantial variation between school classes in pupils' subjective health complaints. In school classes with high demands, the odds of having subjective health complaints was about 50% higher than in school classes with low demands. Further, the results indicated that these effects were mediated by sex so as to girls being more affected by high levels of demands in the school class. Conclusions: The findings are important since they point at the crucial role that teachers play in creating a favourable school climate. Therefore interventions aiming at supporting teachers to set realistic demands and expectations are one way to improve the school climate. Such interventions should also make clear the need to take into consideration the fact that the school class effect was mediated by sex, i.e. girls being more vulnerable to high level of school class demands.

Keyword
Child; context; HBSC; health promotion; multilevel logistic regression; schools
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-11645 (URN)10.1177/1403494810364683 (DOI)000278152300002 ()20360148 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77953415684 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-06-11 Created: 2010-06-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
3. Perceptions of community trust and safety: Consequences for children’s well-being in rural and urban contexts
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of community trust and safety: Consequences for children’s well-being in rural and urban contexts
2011 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 10, p. 1373-1378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim:  To explore the associations between subjective well-being and perceptions of community trust and safety amongst children in rural and urban areas.

Methods:  The study used self-reported data from the 2001/2002 Swedish cross-national WHO study Health Behaviour in School-aged Children. The sample consisted of 3852 children aged 11–15 years, living in different residential areas. Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression were performed.

Results:  The results indicated that a greater proportion of children in urban areas perceived low community trust and safety, compared with children in rural areas. Further, the multivariate analysis revealed that perceived community trust and safety significantly impacts upon children’s subjective well-being in both rural and urban contexts.

Conclusion:  Children’s perceptions of trust and safety have different magnitudes in urban and rural areas. The associations of perceptions of community trust and safety for children’s subjective well-being are relevant in both urban and rural areas. As perceptions of low trust and safety in the community seem to be related to low subjective well-being, efforts to encourage community trust and safety should be included amongst the key priorities in community health promotion.

Keyword
Adolescent; HBSC; Health promotion; Social capital
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-13933 (URN)10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02346.x (DOI)000294900300031 ()21554386 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-80052822711 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-06-08 Created: 2011-06-08 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
4. Growing up in rural community - children's experiences of social capital from perspectives of wellbeing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growing up in rural community - children's experiences of social capital from perspectives of wellbeing
2010 (English)In: Rural and remote health, ISSN 1445-6354, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 1322-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: People are influenced by the neighborhood in which they live. The neighborhood may be particularly important for children’s wellbeing because of the constraints it imposes on their patterns of daily activities. Furthermore, the neighborhood is a central context for social development, being a place where children form networks and learn social skills and values. The aim of this study was to describe how social capital in the neighborhood is perceived by children living in rural areas, and to reveal what this adds to their sense of wellbeing. Methods: The study had a descriptive research design with a qualitative approach. Seven single-sex focus group interviews were conducted with children the in 6th grade (aged 11–12 years). Data were analyzed using deductive content analysis. Results: The children perceived a lack of social capital due to environmental and social constraints in their everyday lives. However, their wellbeing was enhanced by strong cohesion in the neighborhood. In addition, settings such as the school, the natural environment, and sporting associations were highly valued and emerged as crucial factors for enhancing the children’s wellbeing. The spatial isolation that characterizes rural areas created a special context of social network structures, cohesion and trust, but was also a breeding ground for exclusion and social control. The stories revealed paradoxical feelings of living in a good and safe area that simultaneously felt isolated and restricted. Conclusions: From a rural perspective, this study reveals the complexity of the children’s perceptions of their social environment, and the ways in which these perceptions have both positive and negative effects on wellbeing. The results highlight how important it is for health professionals in rural areas to consider the complex influence of bonding social capital on children’s wellbeing, and to be aware that it can promote exclusion as well as cohesion.

Keyword
health determinant, health promotion, social capital
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-11930 (URN)000286342600005 ()20701413 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79952012810 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-08-24 Created: 2010-08-24 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Barns självrapporterade hälsa(968 kB)1972 downloads
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Eriksson, Ulrika

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