miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Peer sexual harassment in schools  - normalisation of gender practices in a neoliberal time
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2148-8044
2011 (English)In: Normalization and the production of "outsiderhood". Feminist readings of a neoliberal welfare state / [ed] Fahlgren, S., Johansson, A., Mulinari, D., Bentham eBooks, 2011, p. 58-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter focuses on the way in which organizations and legislation, despite their explicit intentions, nevertheless promote normative inequality, maintaining sexual harassment as an apparently inevitable part of schooling. Peer sexual harassment is found to be both frequent and pervasive in Swedish schools and is more or less expected as an everyday hassle that students have to handle. This chapter highlights the social and discursive pre-conditions that, despite laws and policies, let behaviours related to sexual harassment continue to take place at a high frequency. These behaviours function as an obstacle for change toward a safe school environment, which is free from discriminating behaviours. Drawing on previous research, this chapter shows the gap between manifest legislation and common practices at school. The method is interpretive and critical, in the sense that it is a sustained discussion of questions being raised by earlier studies. The following six aspects of the discursive normalization processes that collaborate to make sexual harassment a common and concealed phenomenon in Swedish schools are: 1) Not including genderbased violence as a specific domain in the national public health policy; 2) Sexual harassment being invisible in school surveys; 3) Sexual harassment being invisible in anti-bullying programmes; 4) Ignorance of power and gender perspectives in schools; 5) The normalization of asymmetric power relations as a hindrance to victims speaking up and taking action; and 6) Lack of a common understanding and definition of sexual harassment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bentham eBooks, 2011. p. 58-67
Series
Rethinking research and professional practices in terms of ralationality, subjectivity and power
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-15131DOI: 10.2174/978160805279010058ISBN: 978-1-60805-279-0 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-15131DiVA, id: diva2:463623
Available from: 2011-12-09 Created: 2011-12-09 Last updated: 2011-12-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Gillander Gådin, Katja

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gillander Gådin, Katja
By organisation
Department of Health Sciences
Gender Studies

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 598 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf