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Oscillating Bubble SHG on Surface Elastic and Surface Viscoelastic Systems: New Insights in the Dynamics of Adsorption Layers
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media. (DPC - Digital printing center)
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2006 (English)In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, Vol. 110, no 37, 18466-18472 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Surface rheology governs a great variety of interfacial phenomena such as foams or emulsions and plays a dominant role in several technological processes such as high-speed coating. Its major difference with bulk rheology resides in the high compressibility of the surface phase, which is the direct consequence of the molecular exchange between adsorbed and dissolved species. In analogy to bulk rheology, a complex surface dilational modulus, ε, which captures surface tension changes upon defined area changes of the surface layer, can be defined. The module ε is complex, and the molecular interpretation of the dissipative process that gives rise to the imaginary part of the module is subject to some controversy. In this contribution, we used the oscillating bubble technique to study the surface dilational modulus in the mid-frequency range. The dynamic state of the surface layer was monitored by a pressure sensor and by surface second-harmonic generation (SHG). The pressure sensor measures the real and imaginary part of the modulus while SHG monitors independently the surface composition under dynamic conditions. The experiment allows the assessment of the contribution of the compositional term to the surface dilational modulus ε. Two aqueous surfactant solutions have been characterized:  a surface elastic and a surface viscoelastic solution. The elastic surface layer can be described within the framework of the extended Lucassen−van den Tempel Hansen model. The change in surface concentration is in phase with the relative area change of the surface layer, which is in strong contrast with the results obtained from the surface viscoelastic solution. Here, surface tension, area change, and surface composition are phase-shifted, providing evidence for a nonequilibrium state within the surface phase. The data are used to assess existing surface rheology models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 110, no 37, 18466-18472 p.
Keyword [en]
adsorption dynamics
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-6670DOI: 10.1021/jp063014lLocal ID: 6011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-6670DiVA: diva2:37568
Available from: 2008-10-08 Created: 2008-10-08 Last updated: 2009-07-30Bibliographically approved

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Örtegren, Jonas
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
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