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A cognitive behavior therapy-based intervention among poorly controlled adult type 1 diabetes patients--a randomized controlled trial.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7256-349X
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2009 (English)In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, Vol. 77, no 1, 72-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of a Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT)-based intervention on HbA(1c), self-care behaviors and psychosocial factors among poorly controlled adult type 1 diabetes patients. METHODS: Ninety-four type 1 diabetes patients were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a control group. The intervention was based on CBT and was mainly delivered in group format, but individual sessions were also included. All subjects were provided with a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) during two 3-day periods. HbA(1c), self-care behaviors and psychosocial factors were measured up to 48 weeks. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed with respect to HbA(1c) (P<0.05), well-being (P<0.05), diabetes-related distress (P<0.01), frequency of blood glucose testing (P<0.05), avoidance of hypoglycemia (P<0.01), perceived stress (P<0.05), anxiety (P<0.05) and depression (P<0.05), all of which showed greater improvement in the intervention group compared with the control group. A significant difference (P<0.05) was registered with respect to non-severe hypoglycemia, which yielded a higher score in the intervention group. CONCLUSION: This CBT-based intervention appears to be a promising approach to diabetes self-management. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Diabetes care may benefit from applying tools commonly used in CBT. For further scientific evaluation in clinical practice, there is a need for specially educated diabetes care teams, trained in the current approach, as well as cooperation between diabetes care teams and psychologists trained in CBT.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 77, no 1, 72-80 p.
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-6603DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2009.01.015ISI: 000270332000014PubMedID: 19297117Local ID: 5437OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-6603DiVA: diva2:31642
Available from: 2008-11-19 Created: 2008-11-19 Last updated: 2009-10-16Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf