miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The meaning of quality of life: narrations by patients with incurable cancer in palliative home care
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9623-5813
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
2008 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 6, no 3, 231-238 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this qualitative study was to elucidate the meaning of quality of life as narrated by patients with incurable cancer approaching death in palliative home care in Sweden. METHODS: To gain a deeper understanding of what quality of life means for dying patients, data were collected from narrative interviews with eight patients in their homes in 2004-2006. Qualitative content analysis was used to interpret the meaning regarding quality of life. RESULTS: Three main themes were found: being in intense suffering, having breathing space in suffering, and being at home. Living with incurable cancer at the end of life was experienced as living in physical distress as the body became incapacitated by unexpected physical complications. This incapacity had consequences on patients' psychological, social, and existential well-being. As the complication phase abated, the patients experienced that they regained hopefulness and had time to reflect on existential issues. Patients were provided affirmative care at home from family caregivers and the palliative home care team. SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: This study shows that it is feasible to perform individual interviews with patients approaching death and elucidate the meaning of patients' quality of life in palliative home care. Patients oscillate between being in intense suffering and having breathing space in this suffering, which somewhat opposes the traditional picture of a continuous linear deterioration. Being cared for at home by family caregivers and health care professionals provided a sense of independency and security. Being at home safeguards patients' entire life situation and increases quality of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 6, no 3, 231-238 p.
Keyword [en]
hospital based care, narratives, neoplasm, nursing, palliative care, qualitative, quality of life
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-6586PubMedID: 18662416Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-48549091050Local ID: 5920OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-6586DiVA: diva2:31625
Available from: 2008-12-07 Created: 2008-12-07 Last updated: 2016-09-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

PubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Melin Johansson, TittiÖdling, GunvorDanielson, Ella
By organisation
Department of Health Sciences
In the same journal
Palliative & Supportive Care
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 128 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf