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Being in a fragmented and isolated world: Iinterviews with carers working with a person with severely autistic disorder. An interview study
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1614-7379
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
Responsible organisation
2002 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 37, no 4, 346-354 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To illuminate the meaning of being a carer for a person having a severe autistic disorder. Background: Carers working with people with severe autim are occasionally exposed to residents’ self-injurious behaviours and violent actions and at time residents appear resistant to all forms of treatment. Design/Method: A qualitative case study was conducted. Six Swedish carers (ENs), working at a special ward on a nursing home were interviewed about their lived experiences when caring for an individual having a severe autistic disorder. Narrative interviews were conducted and interpreted using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by Paul Ricoeur. Findings: Two themes were formulated which describe the carers’ reality and their dream of an ideal, which described carers’ experiences of being trapped in a segmented and isolated care reality and thier longing to achieve a sense of wholeness. The findings were interpreted and reflected on in the light of a framework inspired by the German philosopher Karl Jaspers in order to achieve a deeper understanding of the text. Concusions: In their desperation the carers used their empirical knowledge based on scientific knowledge, which could be understood as a substitute for their vision of a consolating wholeness. This paper shows that searching for a substitute to consolation seems to be an important aspect of the meaning of being a carer for a person with severe autistic disorder.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 37, no 4, 346-354 p.
Keyword [en]
Autistic disorder, Consolation, Disturbing behaviour, Narratives, Nurse’s reactions, Self-injurious behaviour, Violence
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-5161DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2648.2002.02102.xISI: 000173865800004PubMedID: 11872104Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0036479910Local ID: 361OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-5161DiVA: diva2:30193
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2016-10-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf