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Neuromuscular and circulatory adaptation during combined arm and leg exercise with different maximal work loads
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Nationellt Vintersportcentrum / Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3814-6246
2007 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 101, no 5, 603-611 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cardiopulmonary kinetics and electromyographic activity (EMG) during exhausting exercise were measured in 8 males performing three maximal combined arm + leg exercises (cA+L). These exercises were performed at different rates of work (mean ± SD; 373 ± 48, 429 ± 55 and 521 ± 102 W) leading to different average exercise work times in all tests and subjects. reached a plateau versus work rate in every maximal cA+L exercise (range 6 min 33 s to 3 min 13 s). The three different exercise protocols gave a maximal oxygen consumption of 4.67 ± 0.57, 4.58 ± 0.52 and 4.66 ± 0.53 l min−1 (P = 0.081), and a maximal heart rate (HRmax) of 190 ± 6, 189 ± 4 and 189 ± 6 beats min−1 (P = 0.673), respectively. Root mean square EMG (EMGRMS) of the vastus lateralis and the triceps brachii muscles increased with increasing rate of work and time in all three cA+L protocols. The study demonstrates that despite different maximal rates of work, leading to different times to exhaustion, the circulatory adaptation to maximal exercise was almost identical in all three protocols that led to a plateau. The EMGRMS data showed increased muscle recruitment with increasing work rate, even though the HRmax and was the same in all three cA+L protocols. In conclusion, these findings do not support the theory of the existence of a central governor (CG) that regulates circulation and neuronal output of skeletal muscles during maximal exercise. Thibault Brink-Elfegoun and Hans-Christer Holmberg contributed equally to this article.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 101, no 5, 603-611 p.
Keyword [sv]
Fysiologi, Cirkulation
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-4594DOI: 10.1007/s00421-007-0526-4ISI: 000249917800010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-34948909133Local ID: 5514OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-4594DiVA: diva2:29626
Note

VR-Medicine, External

Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2016-09-26Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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