miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Lung volume and diving performance in elite apneists
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
Responsible organisation
2007 (English)In: Proceedings. 33rd EUBS Annual Scientific Meeting, Sharm el Sheik, Egypt, 8-15 September 2007, 2007Conference paper, (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background The ability to perform extended apnea depends mainly on 3 factors: a) the total body gas storage capacity (in blood, tissues and lungs), b) the tolerable levels of hypoxia and hypercapnia, and c) the ability to restrict metabolism (work economy and diving response). To maximize lung volume is an obvious way to increase a), and large lungs with small residual volume are also beneficial for reaching great depths without risking squeeze. Negative effects of large lung volume may be increased surface buoyancy and high intra-thoracic pressure, with a negative effect on venous return, risk of syncope, and a decreased diving response, which is important for c). However, trained divers have previously been reported to have large lungs (Carey et al 1956) and the positive effects may outweigh the disadvantages. The present study evaluated if large lungs are associated with good results in competitive apneic diving. Methods Height, weight and vital capacity (VC), without lung packing, were recorded in 14 male apneic divers participating in the apnea world championship in Hurgada 2006. Their previous apnea training experience was 5.8(1.2) years. Individual total competition scores i.e. the accumulated points from dives of maximal depth, time and distance, were compared with lung volumes. Results Subject mean(SE) height was 184(2) cm, weight was 82(3) kg and VC was 7.3(0.3) L. Mean dive performance of these subjects was 75(4) m for constant weight deep diving, 5 min 53(39) s for static apnea (resting submersion) and 139(13) m for dynamic apnea (pool distance). A PearsonĀ“s correlation test revealed that lung volume was positively correlated with the total competition score (r = 0.54; P<0.05). Individual height and weight were not correlated with performance. Conclusions We conclude that large lung volume may contribute to successful apnea performance in humans and that any negative effects are outweighed by benefits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007.
Keyword [en]
lung volume, apnea, hypoxia, hypercapnia, diving response
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-4365Local ID: 5599OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-4365DiVA: diva2:29397
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2009-10-29 Last updated: 2010-02-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Schagatay, ErikaLodin, AngelicaRichardson, Matt
By organisation
Department of Natural SciencesDepartment of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics
Biological Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 163 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf