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Stress of conscience and perceptions of conscience in relation to burnout among care providers in older people
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
Responsible organisation
2008 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, Vol. 17, no 14, 1897-1906 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims. The aim was to study the relationship between conscience and burnout among care-providers in older care, exploring the relationship between stress of conscience and burnout, and between perceptions of conscience and burnout.Background. Everyday work in healthcare presents situations that influence care-providers' conscience. How care-providers perceive conscience has been shown to be related to stress of conscience (stress related to troubled conscience), and in county council care, an association between stress of conscience and burnout has been found.Method. A questionnaire study was conducted in municipal housing for older people. A total of 166 care-providers were approached, of which 146 (50 registered nurses and 96 nurses' aides/enrolled nurses) completed a questionnaire folder containing the stress of conscience questionnaire, the perceptions of conscience questionnaire and the maslach burnout inventory. Multivariate canonical correlation analysis was used to explore relationships.Result. The relationship between stress of conscience and burnout indicates that experiences of shortcomings and of being exposed to contradictory demands are strongly related to burnout (primarily to emotional exhaustion). The relationship between perceptions of conscience and burnout indicates that a deadened conscience is strongly related to burnout.Conclusion. Conscience seems to be of importance in relation to burnout, and suppressing conscience may result in a profound loss of wholeness, integrity and harmony in the self.Relevance to clinical practice. The results from our study could be used to raise awareness of the importance of conscience in care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 17, no 14, 1897-1906 p.
Keyword [sv]
Samvetsstress
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-4036DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2007.02184.xISI: 000256635700010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-44949142886Local ID: 5020OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-4036DiVA: diva2:29068
Available from: 2008-12-09 Created: 2008-11-18 Last updated: 2009-01-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf