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Printed Antennas with Variable Conductive Ink Layer Thickness
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media. (Electronics design division)
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics. (Electronics design division)
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media. (Electronics design division)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3790-0729
Responsible organisation
2007 (English)In: IET Microwaves, Antennas & Propagation, ISSN 1751-8725, E-ISSN 1751-8733, Vol. 1, no 2, 401-407 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One of the complex tasks in mass production of RF electronics is printing the communication antenna using electrically conductive ink. For example, this is very common for radio- frequency identification (RFID) tags. Electrical properties of the ink are mostly determined by conductive (e.g. silver) particles mixed into the ink solution and the way they `connect' in the cured ink. It is also desirable to minimise the amount of ink used per antenna, because high-conducting metals like silver used in the ink are rather expensive. Metal-based inks have limited conductivity, so the thicker the cured ink layer will be the better the antenna radiation efficiency can be achieved, but also the higher will be the costs. In the paper, the authors report on the investigations of the possibility of minimising the amount of ink used per antenna. This can be achieved by printing thicker ink layers, where antenna structures are known to have high current density. Two common antenna structures and a dedicated antenna for passive RFID are used in the investigation. The main result of the paper is that radiation efficiency depends primarily on the total amount of ink used for printing the antenna, rather than on the variations of the layer thickness within the antenna structure

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 1, no 2, 401-407 p.
Keyword [en]
RFID, Printed Antennas, Conductive Ink
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-3663DOI: 10.1049/iet-map:20060021ISI: 000246600100021Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-67651053078Local ID: 3750OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-3663DiVA: diva2:28695
Projects
STC - Sensible Things that Communicate
Note

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Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2009-01-07 Last updated: 2016-10-05Bibliographically approved

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Sidén, JohanKoptioug, AndreiNilsson, Hans-Erik
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Department of Information Technology and MediaDepartment of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics
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IET Microwaves, Antennas & Propagation
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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